Pharmaceutical: The Last Six Months
Of Federal Activity

About

This Report

This is a computer-generated report that shows all of the federal activity with respect to the keyword "Pharmaceutical" over the last six months. This is a demonstration of the power of our government relations automation software.

Hansard

House: 30 Speeches
Senate: 8 Speeches

House Senate

Bills

Active: 0

Regulations

Filed: 0
Proposed: 0

The House

Hon. Andrew Scheer (Leader of the Opposition, CPC)

October 15th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...actly what the government did. It capitulated on access to Canada's dairy market. It capitulated on pharmaceuticals, agreeing to Donald Trump's plan for higher drug costs for Canadians. It actually ag...”

Mr. Omar Alghabra (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Trade Diversification, Lib.)

October 5th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...such as aerospace, chemicals, cosmetics, industrial machinery, medical devices, metal and minerals, pharmaceuticals and plastics.

I have given just a snapshot of Canada's vibrant economy, and there are many more sectors in which exporters would benefit from the CPTPP. Securing preferential access to CPTPP markets would mean that almost all Canadian products could be exported to our CPTPP partners without facing tariffs. Upon full implementation of the agreement, 99% of tariff lines for CPTPP parties would become duty-free, covering 98% of Canada's current total exports to CPTPP markets.

The benefits of the CPTPP would not stop there. In addition to addressing traditional trade-policy issues, such as tariffs and technical barriers to trade, the CPTPP would cover trade in services, investment, intellectual property, government procurement and state-owned enterprises. These parts of the agreement would serve to provide Canadian companies, service providers and investors alike with transparency, predictability and certainty in their access to CPTPP markets.

For example, the national treatment and most-favoured-nation provisions, combined with a ratchet mechanism, would mean that Canadian service providers' and investors' access to CPTPP markets could only improve over time as they took steps toward greater liberalization, including when they completed free trade agreement negotiations with other countries around the world. This means that the CPTPP would not only open new markets for Canada today but that our access would improve in the future.

This would be complemented by the commitments made on government procurement in the CPTPP, which would establish fair, open and transparent rules for competitive procurement markets. Canadian businesses would enjoy equal treatment vis-à-vis domestic suppliers when bidding for government contracts in CPTPP markets. As a result, Canadian suppliers would benefit from new opportunities in markets such as Australia, Brunei, Malaysia and Vietnam while gaining expanded government procurement access with existing FTA partners, such as Chile and Peru. It is now clearer than ever that the CPTPP is a big deal for Canadian businesses and workers. (1010)

We are making good on our commitment to create opportunities for small and medium-sized enterprises and to generate economic growth that will benefit all Canadians. This agreement would tear down barriers and build a bridge across the Pacific for Canadian exporters of goods and services.

With the CPTPP, Canada would send a clear signal to the world that it stands firm in its support for a free, rules-based international trading system. In the wake of rising protectionist sentiments around the world, the ratification of the CPTPP would not just secure economic benefits for us today but would solidify our role in the economic architecture of Asia tomorrow and for decades to come. For these reasons, our government is committed to ratifying and bringing the CPTPP into force, and it is why I encourage hon. members of the House to support the bill before us today.

I want to also take a moment to relate the benefits of the CPTPP to my city, the great city of Mississauga. The city of Mississauga is host to 10% of the Fortune 500 companies in Canada. Ten per cent of Fortune 500 companies have their headquarters situated in Mississauga. Most, if not all, of these companies, including the aerospace industry, pharmaceuticals, food processors, engineering companies and financial institutions, would see tremen...”

Mr. Joël Godin (Portneuf—Jacques-Cartier, CPC)

October 5th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...e. That is quite something.

In addition, the agreement extends the data protection period for pharmaceuticals. That means that it will cost Canadians a lot more to stay healthy. That is an impre...”

Hon. Andrew Leslie (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs (Canada-U.S. Relations), Lib.)

October 5th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ovinces and territories to make prescription drugs more affordable. We have joined the pan-Canadian Pharmaceutical Alliance, which has helped Canadians save over $2 billion annually. We are investing ...”

Ms. Karine Trudel (Jonquière, NDP)

October 5th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...d that worries me greatly. The CPTPP will only make things worse. It makes even more concessions to pharmaceutical companies, which will increase Canadians' annual drug expenditures by more than $800 ...”

Ms. Kate Young (London West, Lib.)

October 4th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...s old. This small business holds a special place in the hearts of many Londoners as it has provided pharmaceutical, vitamin and herbal remedies to the community for eight decades. Our government knows...”

Hon. Andrew Scheer (Leader of the Opposition, CPC)

October 3rd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ld Trump. Even after all of that, he still had to back down on so many key areas. He backed down on pharmaceuticals, meaning that Canadian patients and the provincial health care systems will have to ...”

Hon. Andrew Scheer (Leader of the Opposition, CPC)

October 3rd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“.... The Prime Minister has just backed down, by giving Donald Trump's policy preference over Canadian pharmaceuticals, meaning higher prices for patients.

In return for backing down on pharmaceuticals, on accepting a cap on autos, what has he got in return?

Yesterday, the Minist...”

Hon. Pierre Poilievre (Carleton, CPC)

October 3rd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...My colleague asked when the steel tariffs will be removed. The Prime Minister has backed down on pharmaceuticals, dairy, and so much else. I ask again, when will the steel tariffs be removed? When?...”

Hon. Pierre Poilievre (Carleton, CPC)

October 3rd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... Minister who was clearly floundering from the beginning. Now we have the result. He backed down on pharmaceuticals with higher drug prices for Canadian seniors. He backed down on dairy, imposing Cana...”

Ms. Elizabeth May (Saanich—Gulf Islands, GP)

October 3rd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ed to enter our marketplace. We remain concerned about the USMCA giving longer patent protection to pharmaceutical companies, thus driving up drug costs. We remain concerned about other sectors that a...”

Mr. Omar Alghabra (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Trade Diversification, Lib.)

October 3rd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...trial machinery, medical devices, information and communications technologies, metals and minerals, pharmaceuticals and plastics.

The benefits of the CPTPP do not stop there.

The agreement...”

Mr. Ben Lobb (Huron—Bruce, CPC)

October 3rd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...the “M”.

There are buy America provisions, steel and aluminum tariffs, further IP protection, pharmaceuticals and concessions on supply management that it appears none of them are going to ever ...”

Hon. Andrew Scheer (Leader of the Opposition, CPC)

October 2nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ome back with an improved deal. Now we know what the government has given up. It has backed down on pharmaceuticals, meaning Canadian patients will have to pay more so U.S. companies can make bigger p...”

Hon. Andrew Scheer (Leader of the Opposition, CPC)

October 2nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ality, this is NAFTA 0.5. They have made so many concessions on key areas. They have backed down on pharmaceuticals. They have backed down on dairy. In fact, they gave away so much that Donald Trump's...”

Hon. Chrystia Freeland (Minister of Foreign Affairs, Lib.)

October 2nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...he provinces and territories to make prescription drugs more affordable. We joined the pan-Canadian Pharmaceutical Alliance, which has helped Canadians save over $2 billion annually. We are investing ...”

Mrs. Marilène Gill (Manicouagan, BQ)

October 1st
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...reater competitive advantage. Chalk up another loss for health care with Ottawa protecting American pharmaceutical companies from low-cost drugs.

Ottawa gave Mr. Trump everything he wanted and g...”

Hon. Andrew Scheer (Leader of the Opposition, CPC)

October 1st
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...as made concessions on dairy, he has made concessions on auto quotas and he has made concessions on pharmaceuticals, meaning that Canadian patients will have to pay higher drug costs. We would have ho...”

Hon. Andrew Scheer (Leader of the Opposition, CPC)

October 1st
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... on dairy. He has backed down to Donald Trump on auto quotas. He has backed down to Donald Trump on pharmaceuticals, meaning Canadian patients will have to pay higher drug costs.

After making al...”

Hon. Pierre Poilievre (Carleton, CPC)

October 1st
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...state and local projects south of the border, yet the government has backed down to Donald Trump on pharmaceuticals, with higher drug prices for Canadians; and has backed down on copyright, dairy and ...”

Hon. Pierre Poilievre (Carleton, CPC)

October 1st
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...the word “capitulate” because capitulate is precisely what they have done. They have capitulated on pharmaceuticals, allowing Trump to force higher drug costs on Canadian patients to boost American dr...”

Hon. Pierre Poilievre (Carleton, CPC)

October 1st
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...Canadian auto exports. They backed down to Donald Trump, forcing Canadians to pay higher prices for pharmaceuticals. We know they backed down on copyright, dairy and other policies. What did they get ...”

Ms. Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.)

September 18th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ve committed to eliminating restrictive red tape in sectors such as cosmetics, medical instruments, pharmaceuticals, and ICTs, and this will give Canadian manufacturing exporters greater certainty and...”

Mr. Peter Fonseca (Mississauga East—Cooksville, Lib.)

September 18th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... that burdensome and restrictive regulatory red tape in such sectors as cosmetics, medical devices, pharmaceuticals and ICT will provide Canadian manufacturing exporters with greater certainty and pre...”

Ms. Tracey Ramsey (Essex, NDP)

September 17th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ght terms, minimum terms of data protections for biologics and rules that would have encouraged the pharmaceutical practice of evergreening. If the United States were to rejoin the pact, the suspended provisions could be be brought back to life with the consensus of treaty members. This is very dangerous. It could lead to more stringent patent terms and higher drug costs for Canadians. In fact, we are anxiously waiting to see right now if a revised NAFTA will contain some of these same or even worse proposals. Canadians are very worried about this. At a time when the government should be introducing universal pharmacare and not just studying it again, and working to lower the cost of Canadians' prescription medications, they could in fact be setting us up for the opposite.

Now I want to talk a little bit about the rebranding and about the “P” in the CPTPP that stands for progressive. How can the Liberals brand this deal as progressive? Let us talk about some of the issues that exist in that. The new mandate letter, I should point out, for the new International Trade Diversification Minister omits any reference to this Liberal so-called progressive agenda, which is quite telling I think.

The CPTPP has no chapters on gender or on the rights of indigenous people, which is something that the government said was important in the course of NAFTA negotiations. Why has it disappeared from the CPTPP? The CPTPP does not even mention the words “climate change” and its labour provisions are extremely weak. It contains provisions that will weaken Canada's supply-managed sector. It contains harmful ISDS provisions that have been destructive for environment and corrosive to the sovereignty of our government. None of those things are particularly progressive. I will give my colleagues a quote from Scott Sinclair at the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives. He stated:

If the Trudeau government’s rhetoric about progressive trade and inclusive growth means anything—which is an open question—then it requires a genuine rebalancing of trade treaties to better protect workers, citizens and the environment, and to confront the 21st century challenges of extreme inequality and runaway climate change. (1310)

The next thing I would like to discuss a little is the consultations. Certainly the Liberal government is in favour of consultations, although the meaningfulness of those consultations has really come under scrutiny, particularly over the NAFTA talks that happened over the summer.

As I have said, the Conservatives signed us on to this deal in 2015 during the campaign. As soon as the Liberals took office, they promised that their new government would be different and that it would consult with the public. Instead of undertaking meaningful public consultations, the government passed this on to the international trade committee, of which I am the vice-chair. Our trade committee's so-called public consultations were widely criticized for restricting public participation in a variety of ways. For example, we received over 8,000 submissions from Canadians, but we struggled to translate and adequately review all these submissions. The fact is that the committees, not just my own, have limited resources, and are not equipped to do true public consultations. The Liberals love to say that they are consulting, but their shallow definition of what constitutes public consultation is very troublesome. This was shown in the recent court ruling on the pipeline and the government's failure to properly consult indigenous people.

On the TPP, the trade committee hearings allowed for a one-hour time slot for the public to make presentations. Every city we toured was filled with people who wanted to speak about the TPP. In Montreal, 19 out of 19 public presenters were opposed. In Quebec City, three out of three were opposed. We heard from more than 400 witnesses and received written comments from more than 60,000 Canadians, of whom 95% were opposed to the TPP.

According to Global Affairs documents obtained by The Council of Canadians, only two out of 18,000 Canadians wrote to the government in support of the TPP. I want to repeat that: two out of 18,000 people who wrote the government expressed support. That means only .01% of everyone who participated in these email consultations supported the deal. It is no wonder the Liberals are using the guise of public consultations as cover to sign Canada on to the job-killing TPP.

Let us talk about the timing. At a time when the Trump administration is threatening to implement devastating auto tariffs, both the Conservatives and Liberals are championing a trade deal that would put 58,000 Canadian jobs at risk, 20,000 in auto parts alone. The leader of the Conservative Party asked to recall the House of Commons in the summer in order to ram through the TPP trade deal, which would decimate these industries, industries that are already endangered under Trump's outrageous tariffs. There could not be a worse time to be ratifying the CPTPP. Destroying one industry in hopes that another one will eventually grow is not diversification; it is a death sentence for our domestic sectors. Conservatives may be comfortable turning their backs on the auto sector, as it appears the Liberals are, but New Democrats will stand strong with them in these very difficult times.

Let us talk about tariffs. We know the CPTPP would lead to the elimination of tariffs on a range of imported goods and exports in sectors like aerospace, metals and minerals, chemicals and plastics, industrial machinery, pharmaceuticals, agriculture and agrifood, fish and seafood, and forestry and value-added wood produ...”

Mr. Omar Alghabra (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Trade Diversification, Lib.)

September 17th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“..., like aerospace, chemicals, cosmetics, industrial machinery, medical devices, metals and minerals, pharmaceuticals and glasses. It will also provide benefits for consumers, with lower prices and more...”

Mr. Don Davies (Vancouver Kingsway, NDP)

May 31st
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... excise tax on medical cannabis. Currently, the situation in Canada is that we do not tax medicine. Pharmaceuticals go through a process and get something called a “drug identification number”, or DIN...”

Mr. Mark Gerretsen (Kingston and the Islands, Lib.)

May 31st
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...dget, in particular the cannabis excise framework, specifically says that to help those who rely on pharmaceutical cannabis products to relieve pain or treat illness, the government will exempt these products from the excise duties, so long as they are acquired through a prescription. It goes on to say, similarly, “pharmaceutical products derived from cannabis will also be exempt, provided that the cannabis produc...”

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Minister of Health, Lib.)

May 10th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ess the crisis. Unfortunately, at the same time when the United States was pursuing charges against pharmaceutical companies that inappropriately marketed opioids, the former Harper government failed ...”

Ms. Sheri Benson (Saskatoon West, NDP)

April 23rd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...The only people benefiting from yet again more talk, more consultation, and no action are the pharmaceutical companies, which continue to gouge Canadians and the health care system. Canadians pa...”


The Senate

Hon. Leo Housakos

October 2nd
Hansard Link

Foreign Affairs and International Trade United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement

“...r. We allowed better protection for patent drugs all of a sudden, meaning fewer jobs in our generic pharmaceutical industry and higher prices for Canadian consumers, so we sold down the river the generic pharmaceutical industry. We created an important breach in the auto pact with quotas that we have ac...”

Hon. Yonah Martin (Deputy Leader of the Opposition)

October 2nd
Hansard Link

Foreign Affairs and International Trade United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement

“... Leader in the Senate and it concerns the new trilateral trade agreement. Under the agreement, many pharmaceuticals will have their patent protection extended from eight to 10 years. This means that Canadians who use these prescription drugs will have to pay more and wait longer for less expensive generic versions. Yesterday was National Seniors Day, and we know that many seniors across our country already struggle with the high cost of medication. The types of drugs made more expensive by the new trade agreement include those used to treat arthritis and other chronic inflammatory diseases. My question, leader, is this: What did Canada receive in exchange for the concessions on pharmaceuticals, and what does the government plan to do for our seniors, who will have to pay more ...”

Hon. Peter Harder (Government Representative in the Senate)

October 2nd
Hansard Link

Foreign Affairs and International Trade United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement

“...nd access to prescription drugs. Senators will know that the government has joined the pan-Canadian Pharmaceutical Alliance, which negotiates lower drug prices on behalf of public drug plans. To date, I’m informed this has led to $1.2 billion of annual savings for Canadians. (1600) The government is also investing more than $140 million to improve access to pharmaceuticals and support innovation within the health care system, and they are working with the ...”

Hon. Chantal Petitclerc

September 27th
Hansard Link

Voluntary Blood Donations Bill Bill to Amend—Second Reading—Debate Continued

“...rapies. As you can appreciate, plasma is invaluable to the hospital system and increasingly for the pharmaceutical industry. The reality is that today, the global plasma industry posts annual sales of more than $14 billion. According to Canadian Blood Services, the demand for plasma-derived pharmaceutical products increases by 10 per cent a year. It is the same thing in the United States, Europe, and Australia. [English] Thanks to voluntary donations of blood to Canadian Blood Services and Héma-Québec, the supply of plasma for transfusions in Canada is self-sustaining most of the time. However, these two public bodies, which offer no financial compensation, struggle to meet the demand for plasma used to create pharmaceutical products. According to Health Canada, only 17 per cent of our plasma needs are met by...”

Hon. Pamela Wallin

September 20th
Hansard Link

Government’s Legal Obligation to Protect and Maintain a Voluntary Blood System Inquiry—Debate Concluded

“...ened up access to blood collection to private companies and issued operating licences to a national pharmaceutical company, Canadian Plasma Resources, which is now the chief for-profit entity that col...”

Senator Ringuette

June 19th
Hansard Link

Cannabis Bill Motion in Amendment Negatived

“...o acquire medical marijuana with a prescription. Quite honestly, I wondered just how much of a hand pharmaceutical companies had in that. I read the excellent presentation that former minister Benoît ...”

Senator Seidman

June 1st
Hansard Link

Cannabis Bill Motion in Amendment Adopted

“...passed in 2014, still is not in full force protecting Canadians from the unintended consequences of pharmaceutical products —because the regulations are not written. There you go: 2014, legislation pa...”

Hon. Lillian Eva Dyck

May 22nd
Hansard Link

Food and Drugs Act Bill to Amend—Third Reading—Debate Continued

“...e, with this bill a new preservative which has been proved safe by animal testing could be used for pharmaceuticals but could not be used as an ingredient in a cosmetic. On those rare occasions, the m...”


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