Pharmaceutical: The Last Six Months
Of Federal Activity

About

This Report

This is a computer-generated report that shows all of the federal activity with respect to the keyword "Pharmaceutical" over the last six months. This is a demonstration of the power of our government relations automation software.

Hansard

House: 13 Speeches
Senate: 7 Speeches

House Senate

Bills

Active: 0

Regulations

Filed: 0
Proposed: 0

The House

Mr. Don Davies (Vancouver Kingsway, NDP)

May 31st
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... excise tax on medical cannabis. Currently, the situation in Canada is that we do not tax medicine. Pharmaceuticals go through a process and get something called a “drug identification number”, or DIN...”

Mr. Mark Gerretsen (Kingston and the Islands, Lib.)

May 31st
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...dget, in particular the cannabis excise framework, specifically says that to help those who rely on pharmaceutical cannabis products to relieve pain or treat illness, the government will exempt these products from the excise duties, so long as they are acquired through a prescription. It goes on to say, similarly, “pharmaceutical products derived from cannabis will also be exempt, provided that the cannabis produc...”

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Minister of Health, Lib.)

May 10th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ess the crisis. Unfortunately, at the same time when the United States was pursuing charges against pharmaceutical companies that inappropriately marketed opioids, the former Harper government failed ...”

Ms. Sheri Benson (Saskatoon West, NDP)

April 23rd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...The only people benefiting from yet again more talk, more consultation, and no action are the pharmaceutical companies, which continue to gouge Canadians and the health care system. Canadians pa...”

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux (Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons, Lib.)

March 20th
Hansard Link

The Budget

“...y. It chose not to do that.

The Standing Committee on Health has recognized the importance of pharmaceuticals and the cost of medications. Its report has been brought forward. I think it is a st...”

Mr. Gabriel Ste-Marie

March 20th
Hansard Link

The Budget

“...lumbia's. We need more support for the high-tech, aerospace, and informatics industries. We saw our pharmaceutical sector collapse for lack of support. That is also the case for the manufacturing sect...”

Mr. Francis Scarpaleggia (Lac-Saint-Louis, Lib.)

March 19th
Hansard Link

The Budget

“...peutic approaches, and to the creation of local biotechnology enterprises or to collaborations with pharmaceutical companies internationally. [English]

By investing in fundamental science, ...”

Hon. Bill Morneau

February 27th
Hansard Link

The Budget

“... the government recognizes, that we need to consider how we can ensure all Canadians have access to pharmaceuticals. This is an important issue we need to deal with. The reason we are moving forward w...”

Hon. Bill Morneau

February 27th
Hansard Link

The Budget

“...ard pharmacare, what we are going to do is very carefully analyze how we can best deliver access to pharmaceuticals for all Canadians. We know that our system right now presents some Canadians with a ...”

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux (Winnipeg North, Lib.)

February 26th
Hansard Link

Routine Proceedings

“... pharmacare program, adding their voices to many others in terms of the need to look at the cost of pharmaceuticals that so many constituents are unable to afford. They are asking the government to lo...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

February 13th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...n now to bring down prices. We joined the provinces and territories as a member of the pan-Canadian Pharmaceutical Alliance, which negotiates lower drug prices on behalf of public drug plans. Through budget 2017, we are investing over $140 million to help improve access to pharmaceuticals and to support innovations within the health care system. We are going to continue t...”

Mr. Alistair MacGregor

February 8th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...of whom are cutting back on their prescriptions. They are unable to afford them because the cost of pharmaceuticals in this country is so high.

The Conservatives fail to understand that, yes, we...”

Ms. Irene Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe, NDP)

January 29th
Hansard Link

Routine Proceedings

“...omptly implement universal cost coverage for this drug, that programs be put in place, and that the pharmaceutical be rolled out in the most timely and inclusive way possible.”


The Senate

Senator Ringuette

June 19th
Hansard Link

Cannabis Bill Motion in Amendment Negatived

“...o acquire medical marijuana with a prescription. Quite honestly, I wondered just how much of a hand pharmaceutical companies had in that. I read the excellent presentation that former minister Benoît ...”

Senator Seidman

June 1st
Hansard Link

Cannabis Bill Motion in Amendment Adopted

“...passed in 2014, still is not in full force protecting Canadians from the unintended consequences of pharmaceutical products —because the regulations are not written. There you go: 2014, legislation pa...”

Hon. Lillian Eva Dyck

May 22nd
Hansard Link

Food and Drugs Act Bill to Amend—Third Reading—Debate Continued

“...e, with this bill a new preservative which has been proved safe by animal testing could be used for pharmaceuticals but could not be used as an ingredient in a cosmetic. On those rare occasions, the m...”

Hon. Carolyn Stewart Olsen

March 1st
Hansard Link

Food and Drugs Act Bill to Amend—Third Reading—Debate Adjourned

“...od and Drugs Act has an unwieldy regulatory structure, which frustrates the cosmetics industry, the pharmaceutical industry, the consumer health products industry and many other stakeholders that I’ve heard of over the years, both in relation to Bill S-214 and regarding Health Canada in general. Counsel for Cosmetics Alliance Canada noted their difficulty in distinguishing the regulation of cosmetics, which one would use, and the chemical preservatives that are added to make those products shelf-stable. As I have stated in media interviews, Bill S-214 has a mechanism within it that empowers the Minister of Health to exempt products or their constituent ingredients if required. I am sure that, once the bill is passed, the ministry will be able to work with stakeholders over the four-year phase-in to ensure our industry is not penalized. The issue of preservatives is complicated and reaches beyond the cosmetics industry into pharmaceuticals and foods. That will be the case for years to come, regardless of this legislation. ...”

Hon. Lucie Moncion

February 27th
Hansard Link

Cannabis Bill Bill to Amend—Second Reading—Debate Continued

“...cts could even be placed in sealed, difficult to open containers, as is currently the case for some pharmaceuticals and highly toxic products or poisons. [Translation] Packaging for such products must...”

Hon. Rosa Galvez

February 7th
Hansard Link

Cannabis Bill Bill to Amend—Second Reading—Debate Continued

“...n of medical cannabis was a success? Why, 16 years later, is medical cannabis not sold as a typical pharmaceutical drug? Will legalizing recreational cannabis, extending from a failed medical system, have a chance to succeed? Bill C-45 is a complete repeal of prohibition and an absence of regulation. It transfers the majority of the responsibilities of legalization to the provinces, which in turn are transferring them to municipalities. However, consideration should be given to keeping more controls at the federal level. Following the legislative experiences in other jurisdictions, policy experts propose alternatives. A central agency or authority that could better control the supply chain or a system of non-profit organization or agency that control a few for-profit licences are good alternatives. Instead, by dispersing responsibility and not establishing clear, measurable goals, Bill C-45 sends a mixed message in terms of health, but also what the real intent of the government is. The business of cannabis in Canada extends far beyond the health sector. Medical cannabis companies are moving fast to the recreational market. Deloitte and others estimate the value of the Canadian market at $29 billion. Aurora Cannabis is building the world’s largest cannabis production facility near Edmonton. Golden Leaf Holdings is making high-potency recreational products including oils and edibles. Honourable senators, $700 million has been raised just in the last six months for cannabis businesses with some of these funds coming from fiscal paradises. Policy experts emphasize that achieving the legislative objectives, namely, reducing illegal markets and the criminalization of youth, will depend on the retail price of cannabis. Prices will have to be competitive with those offered by illicit cannabis dealers but also prohibitive so as to discourage increased use. Further, the infrastructure required to ensure quality control may increase pricing pressure. Despite the need to maintain this delicate balance, the reality is a free “yo-yo” type of market. It is critical to understand that both health and economic sectors agree that the increased availability of cheap recreational cannabis will most likely result in increasing cannabis use. Moreover, experts in the medical sector expect an increase in cannabis abuse and cannabis dependence with legalization, as shown in many studies of young university students in the U.S. How will legalization limit youth access to cannabis and therefore decrease youth consumption? What will happen with medical cannabis dispensaries after legalization? Where is prevention, well-known to be the most effective and cheaper method to solve a problem? In late 2017, the U.S. National Academy of Sciences released an in-depth report on cannabis. The report’s findings are important and revealing. In the past decade, there has been an influx of high-potency cannabis products in the U.S. such as sinsemilla, an engineered plant grown from clones, not from seeds. Data from U.S. DEA seizures record a substantial increase in potency, from 4 per cent in 1995 to 30 per cent in 2016. At 30 per cent THC content and higher, users are not seeking a recreational effect. As a child psychiatrist said: Today cannabis is a whole different substance than that idealized by hippies; the only people saying cannabis is not addictive are regular users and vendors. In fact, last year Colorado proposed an amendment to limit the potency of THC in cannabis products to 16 per cent. Not only do we know little about the health risk of high-potency cannabis products, but we don’t fully understand the effect when cannabis is consumed with other intoxicants. Yet, we know a lot more about cannabis compared to alcohol and tobacco when they entered our lifestyles. Are imports of cannabis seeds being controlled by the Seed Act and Agriculture Canada? Should prices be fixed based on THC content rather than weight as recommended by the task force? How will competition be controlled? Can a minimum price be set? Will the products’ labels warn about all known adverse health effects? Are we allowing policy to outpace science? Hundreds of studies show that cannabis has negative impacts on young, developing brains. It affects cognition, academic achievement and educational outcomes to various degrees, via various brain mechanisms and to various degrees of irreversibility. Cannabis impairs the brain function in young people in terms of planning, reasoning, inhibitory processes, self-monitoring and problem solving. Through the use of neuroimaging techniques, some studies observe alterations in grey and white brain matter, the centres for decision making, executive function and communication between brain regions, from cannabis use. The medical research has also expressed strong concerns that the potency, frequency and mode of intake can alter these effects. In one study of 410 patients with first-episode psychosis, the risk of individuals having a psychotic disorder was roughly three times higher for those who use more potent THC — a potency rate between 40 and 60 per cent — compared to those who never used cannabis. Epidemiological data show that 30 per cent of users of cannabis present a variety of cannabis disorders. The U.S. Drug Abuse Warning Network estimated that in 2011 there were 456,000 drug-related emergencies in which marijuana use was mentioned in the medical record. In the U.S., there are 88 ongoing research studies on how to treat cannabis dependence. What are the THC dosages, potencies, administration routes, accumulation rates, consumer age, conditions and habits that trigger this brain damage in young people? What are the cumulative impacts of the use of cannabis with other intoxicants? How will emergency and psychiatric services cope with an increase in cannabis disorders? Aren’t they already overloaded with the opioid crisis — a legal pharmaceutical product that has caused a serious societal problem? What are the costs of providing a...”

Senator Boisvenu

February 6th
Hansard Link

Cannabis Bill Bill to Amend—Consideration of Subject Matter in Committee of the Whole

“..., ministers, is this: Will you also commit to releasing the names of owners and distributors in the pharmaceutical industry to the public? [English]”


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