Oil Sand: The Last Six Months
Of Federal Activity

About

This Report

This is a computer-generated report that shows all of the federal activity with respect to the keyword "Oil Sand" over the last six months. This is a demonstration of the power of our government relations automation software.

Hansard

House: 19 Speeches
Senate: 10 Speeches

House Senate

Bills

Active: 0

Regulations

Filed: 1
Proposed: 0

Regulations

The House

Mr. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NDP)

December 12th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...he introduction of any telecom companies into the Canadian environment, about the purchase of major oil sands assets by Chinese companies. No, no, the Chinese government would never stoop to such prac...”

Mr. Gabriel Ste-Marie (Joliette, BQ)

December 7th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...the minimum cost of these trains?

Will it compensate Quebec instead of giving presents to the oil sands industry?”

Mr. Tom Kmiec (Calgary Shepard, CPC)

December 4th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...oon and different parts of British Columbia. We have a government that is intent on phasing out the oil sands, but it is also hurting the energy industry and energy workers who depend on those jobs.

We have a Prime Minister who twice now has said that he wants to phase out the oil sands. The first time he said it was a mistake. The second time, he actually said it in Paris in its legislative assembly. Perhaps he thought Albertans would not catch on, but we did, and we know that he has it in for us. He has it in for the industry that accounts for over 20% of Canada's exports, in dollar figures. That is an incredible amount when compared to the auto sector.

We all saw the news of General Motors shutting down its plant in Oshawa. I, as an Albertan, and I know many of my constituents back home, feel the pain. We understand the pain of losing a job and being told that one is not welcome to come back to work tomorrow and is no longer needed. We understand it, because it has been going on month after month in the province of Alberta. People have been losing their jobs or have been told that they are not needed five days a week anymore. Someone working in construction may come in one day a week. A person cannot feed a family on one day a week of work.

There is a great Yiddish proverb that says, “If things are not as you wish, wish them as they are.” I wish the government would take that advice. Stop saying one thing and doing another. Stop wishing for the end of certain jobs in the private sector. Why not wish them all to succeed?

We have been given an incredible natural endowment of oil and gas. Alberta is also the sunniest province in Canada. It has the most sunny days of any province in Canada, which is a great boon for the solar power industry. There is quite a bit of renewable energy being developed and that has been developed by energy companies, because they are in the business of energy, whichever way it is delivered. Why not promote all of them? Why not defend all of them? That is what Alberta needs and what Canada needs.

We need a government that wants to champion the private sector, not meddle in the private sector. Let it expand, create jobs and do what it does best: provide prosperity for Canadian families. We do not need a government plan. We do not need a government strategy. We do not need government tinkering with different rules. However, that is exactly what we have here. We have a government that is more intent on creating plans and strategies and strategies for plans to plan for strategies, creating more jobs in the public sector here in Ottawa, instead of allowing the private sector to simply do what it does best. We do not have a champion.

Many members have said this already, and I am sure many members will come after me and say it. We have a government that has cancelled pipeline projects. The government strangled energy east to the point that TransCanada could not continue. We have a government that defeated northern gateway. We will hear government caucus members say that it was actually a court decision. Well, that is not true. There was an order in council cancelling northern gateway passed in 2016. Order in Council 2016-1047, passed November 25, 2016, cancelled northern gateway.

The government has crowed about a $40-billion investment in LNG, while we lost $78 billion in LNG development. That $40 billion was approved back in 2012 by the regulator. It was recently approved to go ahead by the private sector, but only after it got assurances in the final deal that it would be exempted from British Columbia's carbon tax, that it would be exempted from basically the last three years of bad economic policy passed by both the Liberal government and the provincial NDP government, in the case of British Columbia. If that is not an indictment of how bad things have become, I do not know what is. (1200)

The $40 billion project, approved in 2012, can only go ahead this year with the proviso written into the contract that the past three years of bad economic policy do not apply to them. I do not know what we could call that, other than that it is a form of corporate welfare. This project could not go ahead because the government has been intent on strangling it, making it impossible for them to continue to develop the project, create the jobs and the prosperity to ensure that they can provide taxes and pay royalties to different levels of government. We have a government that is intent on making it more complicated.

When I talked about our needing a champion, I want to reference one of my constituents who is always willing to send me detailed technical information. David Robinson sent me information about New York State pursuing a court case it has brought forward. It is a civil lawsuit against a bunch of oil companies, stating that they failed and disguised the carbon emission costs in their regulatory filings. It specifically targets the Alberta oil sands and Alberta corporations. This is a huge danger to publicly listed companies, especially t...”

Mr. Paul Lefebvre (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources, Lib.)

December 4th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...nadian oil when a number of refineries in the American Midwest were offline. That came as increased oil sands production was outpacing Canada's capacity to transport and export additional barrels.[Tra...”

Hon. Erin O'Toole (Durham, CPC)

December 4th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...teresting about the minister heckling is that before she ran for Parliament, she ran on closing the oil sands. Here we have a cabinet minister who made public statements about shutting down the oil sands and who had no real experience before Parliament, and she is at the cabinet table making t...”

Mr. Tom Kmiec (Calgary Shepard, CPC)

November 29th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... it for three years now, dealing with a government that has as its sole intent the phase-out of the oil sands. Initially, when the Prime Minister said it, he said it was a gaffe, a mistake. He repeate...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

November 28th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...peaker, I was pleased to be in Alberta last week to listen directly to the concerns of folks in the oil sands and business leaders in Calgary. We know there is work we need to do together, and we will...”

Mr. Chris Warkentin (Grande Prairie—Mackenzie, CPC)

November 26th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...>There is a consensus. There is a consensus that opposes the Prime Minister's plan to phase out the oil sands. There is a consensus that opposes the Liberals' unilateral decision to impose a northern ...”

Ms. Elizabeth May

November 21st
Hansard Link

Routine Proceedings

“...shore.

The reason the Alberta Federation of Labour and Unifor, the biggest union representing oil sands workers, intervened at the National Energy Board to oppose the Kinder Morgan pipeline was ...”

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs (Lakeland, CPC)

November 20th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... want paycheques for Canadians.

Last year, the Prime Minister said he wanted to phase out the oil sands, and last spring, he said he regrets that Canada cannot get off oil “tomorrow”. The Prime ...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

November 7th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ove forward to reach our targets partially because Alberta has chosen to put an absolute cap on its oil sands emissions.

We are moving forward with a comprehensive responsible plan to fight clim...”

Mr. Alexandre Boulerice (Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, NDP)

November 1st
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, it emerged today that cleaning up the oil sands will cost $260 billion. That is what we mean when we say pollution is costly.

In the...”

Mr. Dean Allison

October 29th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...C-69 would block all future pipelines.

When the Prime Minister says he wants to phase out the oil sands, Canadians should believe him. In the last two years, over $100 billion of investment in t...”

Ms. Elizabeth May (Saanich—Gulf Islands, GP)

October 2nd
Hansard Link

Routine Proceedings

“...ase of the Trans Mountain pipeline.

The petitioners point out that the expansion will lock in oil sands protection growth, and that this growth in oil sands production is irreconcilable with Canada's targets and international commitments under the...”

Mr. Francis Scarpaleggia (Lac-Saint-Louis, Lib.)

September 28th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“... with the member for Edmonton Strathcona when we sat on the environment committee and looked at the oil sands industry and how it managed water in the Athabasca region.

The bill is not a cure al...”

Mr. Richard Cannings (South Okanagan—West Kootenay, NDP)

September 26th
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“...laims to be a world leader in climate action can approve a pipeline whose only purpose is to expand oil sands production is troubling. This question was raised by the government's own ministerial pane...”

Mr. Peter Schiefke (Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister (Youth) and to the Minister of Border Security and Organized Crime Reduction, Lib.)

September 26th
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“...ith the pan-Canadian framework as well as the Government of Alberta's very own emissions cap on the oil sands.

We have built a path for sustained indigenous engagement through the $64.7 million ...”

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs (Lakeland, CPC)

September 21st
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...are losing hope. It is no wonder why, when the Prime Minister said that Canada should phase out the oil sands and that he regrets Canada cannot get off oil tomorrow, and he defended tax dollars going ...”

Mr. Randy Boissonnault (Edmonton Centre, Lib.)

September 21st
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...t I grew up in Morinviille. Close members of my family and dear friends work and have worked in the oil sands, and I know first-hand the importance of resource development to people's lives and liveli...”


The Senate

Hon. Denise Batters

December 12th
Hansard Link

Impact Assessment BillCanadian Energy Regulator BillNavigation Protection Act Bill to Amend—Second Reading

“...hostile to the plight of western resource workers. The Prime Minister talks about “phasing out” the oil sands, while his ministers muse about leaving oil in the ground. One would think Prime Minister ...”

Hon. David Tkachuk

December 12th
Hansard Link

Impact Assessment BillCanadian Energy Regulator BillNavigation Protection Act Bill to Amend—Second Reading

“... is what the Prime Minister — the man Gerald Butts got elected — had to say: We can’t shut down the oil sands tomorrow. We need to phase them out. We need to manage the transition off of our dependence on fossil fuels. We are the third largest reservoir of oil in the world, and he wants to transition us out of that. Don Braid, writing in the Calgary Herald a few weeks ago, observed that the key words in the Prime Minister’s statement are, “We need to manage the transition.” Braid argued that by imposing new and onerous regulation, withdrawing tax incentives, cancelling pipelines and introducing energy-hostile bills such Bill C-48 and Bill C-69, the Trudeau government has begun the process of managing that transition. I only disagree with his argument to the extent that he didn’t go far enough. There is also Bill C-68, Bill C-88 and Bill C-55 that are energy and resource hostile. Governments that talk in terms of managing the transition away from the oil industry and moving to an alternative economy are not the ones you want in charge of building pipelines and getting our resources to market. They lack a certain — how can I put this — commitment. Just as Bill C-69 cannot be viewed separately from other actions of this government to stifle the resource industry in this country, the words “manage the transition,” used by the Prime Minister, need to be understood within the context of the rest of what he said. The most telling words to me are, “We can’t shut down the oil sands tomorrow.” In other words, what he is saying — not in so many words, mind you — is that he...”

Senator Tkachuk

December 12th
Hansard Link

Impact Assessment BillCanadian Energy Regulator BillNavigation Protection Act Bill to Amend—Second Reading

“... the need for a plug-in station and the fear of dead batteries in cold climates. Then there are the oil sands themselves. Let’s begin by acknowledging that Canada accounts for less than 2 per cent of global emissions, and the oil sands account for less than 10 per cent of that 2 per cent. In other words, the oil sands contribute a paltry 0.16 per cent to global GHG emissions. (1600) China, on the other hand, accounts for 26 per cent of GHG emissions and rising, more than the United States, at 14 per cent, and the European Union, at 9 per cent, combined. Maybe Canada should be focusing on what it can do to convince China to reduce emissions, rather than punishing our homegrown resource industry, the lifeblood of our economy, with a carbon tax and an uncertain, complicated and potentially lengthy regulatory regime outlined in Bill C-69 — especially when that resource industry, as I said, contributes an infinitesimally small amount to global warming and is already an excellent environmental steward. Nobody likes to talk about it, of course, but oil sands producers recycle most of the water they use, 80 to 90 per cent, in fact. They recycle that much. While the oil sands lie under 142,000 square kilometres, their mining footprint is only 904 square kilometres. Oil sands producers have also created Canada’s Oil Sands Innovation Alliance, which has spent $1.3 billion to develop 936 technologies to improve environmental performance in the oil sands in four priority areas: tailings, land, water and GHG emissions. Yet the government slaps ...”

Hon. Elaine McCoy

December 7th
Hansard Link

Impact Assessment BillCanadian Energy Regulator BillNavigation Protection Act Bill to Amend—Second Reading—Debate Continued

“...e hydroelectric project at Muskrat Falls in Newfoundland, or a nuclear plant in Saskatchewan, or an oil sands plant in Alberta, or a damn in northern B.C. I just don’t think the issues are the same. Q...”

Senator Smith

November 28th
Hansard Link

Natural Resources Oil and Gas Industry

“... the federal government has given $35,000 in taxpayers’ money to Tides Canada, an anti-pipeline and oil sands group largely funded out of the United States by Tides USA. Senator Harder, can you please...”

Hon. Paula Simons

November 7th
Hansard Link

Impact Assessment BillCanadian Energy Regulator BillNavigation Protection Act Bill to Amend—Second Reading—Debate Continued

“...chel Notley, which has implemented a comprehensive carbon levy, capped CO2 emissions from Alberta’s oil sands, and moved aggressively towards eliminating all coal-fired electrical generation in the pr...”

Hon. Douglas Black

November 7th
Hansard Link

Oil Tanker Moratorium Bill Second Reading—Debate Continued

“...int of view, speaking on behalf of my province of Alberta, this legislation takes direct aim at the oil sands of Alberta. The purpose of the act is to limit the development of this resource by restric...”

Senator D. Black

November 7th
Hansard Link

Oil Tanker Moratorium Bill Second Reading—Debate Continued

“...important point, because it is widely suggested that diluted bitumen, which is the product from the oil sands, behaves differently in water and is less likely to be cleaned up. The Government of Canada is saying, “No, that’s not the case.” Finally, the Government of Canada tells us that the marine spill prevention regime has been highly effective in responding to any marine pollution incidents in all regions of Canada. The Government of Canada itself is saying that we should not be concerned about our ability in the unlikely but terrible chance of any kind of spill. So I would say to you, senators, when you consider how to vote on this matter that this ban is not based in science. I think there’s no adequate consultation. I think others share that view, including the very people who should be consulted. There is no other oil tanker ban in the world. When you strip away all the rhetoric and all the disguises, this is legislation aimed at capping the ability of product from Canada’s oil sands to safely and responsibly get to markets. I urge you, senators, to consider these points w...”

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi, P.C., M.P., Minister of Natural Resources

October 16th
Hansard Link

Ministry of Natural Resources Climate Change Adaptation Initiatives

“... that the Province of Alberta has put a hard cap on how many emissions can be created by developing oil sands, and that hard cap remains in place. The approval of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion...”

Hon. Douglas Black

October 4th
Hansard Link

Impact Assessment BillCanadian Energy Regulator BillNavigation Protection Act Bill to Amend—Second Reading—Debate Continued

“...onsibility to set forth a policy guideline. So if you do not want to have a pipeline built from the oil sands of Alberta to wherever, just tell us. Tell us up front. So policy issues in any sophistica...”


Filed Regulations

Order Imposing a Surtax on the Importation of Certain Steel Goods: SOR/2018-206

2018 October 11,
CUSTOMS TARIFF
Gazette Link

“...side diameter and wall thickness, in lengths of 60 feet (18.288 m) with no girth welds for exclusive use in slurry or tailings piping systems in oil sands projects and marked "For Use as Slurry/Tailings Pipe Only". For greater certainty, use in a pipeline meeting CSA Z-662 or as pressure piping...”

“...ade and wall thickness, with a manganese content of no less than 16% by weight, for exclusive use in slurry, tailings, and pressure piping systems in oil sands projects, and marked "Not for CSA Z-662 Applications". For greater certainty, use in a pipeline meeting CSA Z-662 is not permitted under thi...”


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