Oil Sand: The Last Six Months
Of Federal Activity

About

This Report

This is a computer-generated report that shows all of the federal activity with respect to the keyword "Oil Sand" over the last six months. This is a demonstration of the power of our government relations automation software.

Hansard

House: 53 Speeches
Senate: 5 Speeches

House Senate

Bills

Active: 0

Regulations

Filed: 0
Proposed: 0

The House

Ms. Elizabeth May (Saanich—Gulf Islands, GP)

October 2nd
Hansard Link

Routine Proceedings

“...ase of the Trans Mountain pipeline.

The petitioners point out that the expansion will lock in oil sands protection growth, and that this growth in oil sands production is irreconcilable with Canada's targets and international commitments under the...”

Mr. Francis Scarpaleggia (Lac-Saint-Louis, Lib.)

September 28th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“... with the member for Edmonton Strathcona when we sat on the environment committee and looked at the oil sands industry and how it managed water in the Athabasca region.

The bill is not a cure al...”

Mr. Richard Cannings (South Okanagan—West Kootenay, NDP)

September 26th
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“...laims to be a world leader in climate action can approve a pipeline whose only purpose is to expand oil sands production is troubling. This question was raised by the government's own ministerial pane...”

Mr. Peter Schiefke (Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister (Youth) and to the Minister of Border Security and Organized Crime Reduction, Lib.)

September 26th
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“...ith the pan-Canadian framework as well as the Government of Alberta's very own emissions cap on the oil sands.

We have built a path for sustained indigenous engagement through the $64.7 million ...”

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs (Lakeland, CPC)

September 21st
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...are losing hope. It is no wonder why, when the Prime Minister said that Canada should phase out the oil sands and that he regrets Canada cannot get off oil tomorrow, and he defended tax dollars going ...”

Mr. Randy Boissonnault (Edmonton Centre, Lib.)

September 21st
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...t I grew up in Morinviille. Close members of my family and dear friends work and have worked in the oil sands, and I know first-hand the importance of resource development to people's lives and liveli...”

Mr. Pierre-Luc Dusseault (Sherbrooke, NDP)

June 14th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...utraged by the government's decision to invest $4.5 billion of our money in a pipeline transporting oil sands to British Columbia, in spite of obvious opposition in several regions of British Columbia...”

Ms. Elizabeth May (Saanich—Gulf Islands, GP)

June 12th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...Does my hon. colleague believe we can expand production of greenhouse-emitting facilities like more oil sands production, new pipelines, and new oil wells, and still meet the Paris target?”

Ms. Linda Duncan

June 12th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...in cleaner technologies. However, it is divesting. Major corporations that formally invested in the oil sands are shifting to renewables, shifting to investing in other jurisdictions, because the fede...”

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi

June 12th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...ns being taken by the Alberta NDP on climate change. It has put a cap on overall emissions from the oil sands. It is phasing out coal. It has put a very effective price on pollution. I hope the federa...”

Mr. Alistair MacGregor (Cowichan—Malahat—Langford, NDP)

June 12th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...is odd for a pipeline that is projected to add at least 13 to 15 megatonnes per year from increased oil sands production. If we look at the downstream emissions from the pipeline, if we were to expand it, it would be an estimated 71.1 megatonnes per year.

If we look at where we are trying to get in terms of keeping global temperatures stable, we can do some analytical modelling on how much carbon dioxide we can emit into the atmosphere to meet that and give every country in the world a carbon budget.

In a day and age when it is widely acknowledged that climate change is real and is happening and that we are the source of it, expanding a pipeline and expanding oil sands production flies in the face of our commitments. We cannot, in this case, walk and chew gum at the same time. It does not work. However, I acknowledge that we are going to continue using oil today, tomorrow, and for the foreseeable future, but what I would like to see is a transition plan so we can try to plateau and start minimizing our use.

The oil sands workers of Alberta have made a very valuable contribution to the Canadian economy, and the...”

Ms. Elizabeth May (Saanich—Gulf Islands, GP)

June 12th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...m of great economic dependency of our country on oil and gas. Did he know that at the height of the oil sands production, it represented 2% of GDP, therefore, 2% of our schools, hospitals, and social ...”

Mr. Randall Garrison (Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke, NDP)

June 12th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...h without collective action.

Second, I have never suggested than an immediate shutdown of the oil sands is the solution, but I have called for a moratorium on the expansion of the oil sands, because we have to stop rushing headlong in the wrong direction. (1340)

Third, th...”

Mrs. Deborah Schulte (King—Vaughan, Lib.)

June 12th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“... coal. This included the phase-out of the accelerated capital cost allowance for tangible assets in oil sands projects. That was in budget 2007, and its implementation was completed in 2015.

It included lowering the deduction rates for intangible capital expenses in oil sands projects to align with the rates for conventional oil and gas. That was in budget 2011, an...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

June 12th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...crats supported Rachel Notley's environmental plan but forgot what was in the plan itself: a cap on oil sands emissions, a price on pollution, and a pipeline to transport resources to markets other th...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

June 12th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...er the case and progressive leaders like Rachel Notley understand that. Thus, in addition to capped oil sands emissions and a price on pollution, her plan includes a pipeline to markets other than the...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

June 12th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ected, but it seems they forgot what that plan contained. Let me remind them. It contained a cap on oil sands emissions. It contained a price on pollution. It also contained a pipeline to get resource...”

Mr. Randy Hoback

June 11th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...r. We needed Kinder Morgan to deliver the oil we were developing and for which we had a market. The oil sands and other oil fields needed that pipeline to get the oil to market. If we cannot get it to...”

Mr. Gabriel Ste-Marie (Joliette, QD)

June 8th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... Paris at COP21, the government is now making radical moves to extract even more dirty oil from the oil sands, which in no way helps address environmental issues.

Is that what we are seeing with...”

Ms. Kim Rudd (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources, Lib.)

June 8th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ct the environment, but it seems they forgot what that plan contained. Let me remind them: a cap on oil sands emissions, a price on pollution, a pipeline to get resources to markets other than the Uni...”

Mr. Tom Kmiec (Calgary Shepard, CPC)

June 7th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...y $30 billion. Now Kinder Morgan is fleeing Canada in the face of the Liberal plan to phase out our oil sands.

Canadian energy investors are now creating a record number of new jobs outside of C...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

June 6th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...e playing politics with this issue. I can tell them that I was just in Alberta yesterday talking to oil sands workers, talking to pipeline workers, who are deeply grateful that we are able to move for...”

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs (Lakeland, CPC)

June 4th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...he value chain, in upstream exploration and production, and in service supply and technology in the oil sands, heavy oil, natural gas, and on pipelines. In Lakeland, a Cree community of about 1,200 people, the Frog Lake First Nation, wanted to reduce poverty in its community. It started its own oil and gas exploration company. Today, Frog Lake Energy Resources Corp. extracts over 3,000 barrels of oil per day, which has brought millions of dollars into its community. It has over $30 million in cash flow. The chairman of its board, Joe Dion said:

Together, we have to make reconciliation a priority, given the economic risks and gridlock that continues to impede the resource sector nationally, and Alberta's energy sector in particular. I believe that reconciliation can be realized right here in Alberta's energy sector. It is time for bold action. Alberta is not at the cross-roads, it’s in the ditch.

The story of Frog Lake is the story of Albertans and people across Canada. It is about aspirations, ambition, entrepreneurialism, and taking ownership of opportunities.

Sometimes I think my colleagues in the NDP would have us believe that communities like Frog Lake do not exist, that all indigenous peoples in communities are opposed to oil and gas. That is just not the reality. The Fort McKay and Mikisew Cree bands have invested $545 million to buy nearly half the shares in one of Suncor's storage facilities. There are 35 first nations working together, right now and for the past five years, to build an indigenous-owned pipeline from Alberta to northern British Columbia, an initiative that would have the support of every single indigenous community and two provinces along the road if it can go ahead.

The Fort McKay band, near the Athabaska oil sands, has an unemployment rate of 0%, and financial holdings in excess of $2 billion. Its band members have an average annual income of $120,000. (1300)

Goodfish Lake Business Corporation in Lakeland employs 150 Albertans through three dry cleaning and laundry services, which contract with oil and gas, one of which is located in White Fish first nation. A sewing and garment company in Fort McMurray, called Protective Clothing Supplies Ltd., produces petrochemical workwear for businesses in the oil sands.

All of these communities provide jobs for their members and employ people outside o...”

Hon. Catherine McKenna (Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Lib.)

June 1st
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... pollution, and it is phasing out coal. It has also put the first-ever hard cap on emissions in the oil sands. That is how this fits in our climate plan. Of course, we are doing more. We are making in...”

Mr. Gabriel Ste-Marie (Joliette, GPQ)

June 1st
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...aid that to help the environment, the Liberals plan to build more pipelines and further develop the oil sands, generating revenue that they will use to set environmental standards and fight climate ch...”

Mrs. Rosemarie Falk (Battlefords—Lloydminster, CPC)

May 31st
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...tainly are not comforted by the Prime Minister's repeated confession that he wants to phase out the oil sands.

The loss of business investment in Canada is a troubling trend, and the Liberals ha...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

May 30th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...mate change was a three-pronged approach, which included limiting greenhouse gas emissions from the oil sands, putting a price on carbon in Alberta, and building a pipeline to get Alberta's resources ...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

May 30th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... years ago, yet they forgot that part of that plan involved three elements: one, an absolute cap on oil sands emissions; two, a price on carbon that would apply to the Alberta economy; and three, gett...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

May 30th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ng investments in Alberta and good jobs for Albertans, and indeed all the Canadians who work in the oil sands industry, for years to come. It is no wonder the Conservatives are flailing about.

W...”

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs (Lakeland, CPC)

May 30th
Hansard Link

Routine Proceedings

“...er the Liberals.

Last year, the Prime Minister told the world that he wanted to phase out the oil sands. In case Canadians thought that this was a slip of the tongue, unfortunately he reinforced it again just a couple of weeks ago in Paris, when he said he regretted that Canada cannot get off oil tomorrow. Therefore, at the outset, is it any wonder that oil and gas proponents and investors around the world might be wondering whether or not the Prime Minister and the Liberals actually welcome oil and gas development in Canada? The Liberals campaigned in co-operation with anti-energy activists, denigrating Canada's world-leading track record as the most responsible oil producer in the world, and denigrating our track record for the highest standards, second to none, for science-, evidence-, and expert-based decision-making, and for consultation with impacted communities and first nations, including the incorporation of traditional knowledge.

The Liberals froze the regulatory system in February 2016, causing massive uncertainty for energy development in Canada. They announced interim measures, most of which had been hallmarks of the Canadian regulatory system for decades. However, one was not, and that was the consideration of upstream emissions for pipeline approvals. Not only was that an overreach into provincial jurisdiction, because that is where upstream emissions are regulated, but it was later magnified by the Liberals instructing that downstream emissions coming from tailpipes should also be attached to a pipeline for consideration of its approval. Ultimately, that is what caused the abandonment of the potential nation-building opportunity in energy east. However, before that, the Liberals had vetoed the northern gateway pipeline, previously approved by the Conservatives, which was the only new stand-alone opportunity to reach tidewater to get Canada's energy into the Asia-Pacific, which will continue to demand oil and gas for years to come. Then, the regulatory delays caused the abandonment of two LNG projects, holding Canada back by missing Asian contracts.

On top of all that, the Liberals decided, at the very worst time for energy workers, to remove the tax credit for new oil and gas drilling and exploration wells, and then imposed a carbon tax on all provinces, increasing costs right across the board. They imposed an offshore drilling ban, which the Premier of the Northwest Territories said destroyed hope for the future of people in his communities. The ban was imposed without adequate consultation, and it does not apply to any other Canadian coast. It stops exports, and it clearly targets the oil sands and the pipelines, because it does not address foreign tankers or American tankers in the ...”

Mr. Robert Sopuck (Dauphin—Swan River—Neepawa, CPC)

May 29th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...rom day one. I saw it in person on the ground when I was doing environmental monitoring work in the oil sands. The care taken by energy companies and contractors with environmental protection was some...”

Mr. Alupa Clarke (Beauport—Limoilou, CPC)

May 22nd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ternational environmental groups, who like to see the Prime Minister contemplating the death of the oil sands, will spend millions of dollars to promote the end of natural and energy resources in Cana...”

Hon. Erin O'Toole (Durham, CPC)

May 8th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“... cost allowance acceleration for any investment that goes to a resource company or a company in the oil sands, one of our largest single contributors to the gross domestic product of Canada. Let us in...”

Mr. Nick Whalen (St. John's East, Lib.)

May 8th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...ing things like a greening government solution and efforts to reduce methane gas emissions from the oil sands. We are working with the provinces to improve infrastructure that will drive the green eco...”

Mr. Blaine Calkins (Red Deer—Lacombe, CPC)

May 8th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...of either Montreal or Halifax. When I would get on that airplane in Ottawa, it would be filled with oil sands workers coming from either Atlantic Canada, the Maritimes, or Quebec. These folks were all wearing their Firebag and Kearl project jackets, they had their workboots on, and they were ready to go all the way to Alberta. These jobs were so well-paying it was cost-effective enough for them to book a flight, go work in the oil sands for several weeks at a time, and then go back to their families. That paycheque would improve the quality of life of these Canadians. People from all over the world would come to Alberta.

Over 4,000 businesses in Canada alone have a direct line to the oil sands because they provide goods, services, or products to the oil sands development. These are millions and millions of dollars of revenue. (1355)

The cos...”

Mr. Kevin Waugh

May 4th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...0 million a day, and 110,000 jobs have been eliminated in my province and in Alberta because of the oil sands. It is because of the Liberals' attack on oil in Saskatchewan and Alberta. This is just an...”

Mrs. Rosemarie Falk (Battlefords—Lloydminster, CPC)

May 4th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... have before us. What we have is another step forward in the Prime Minister's plan to phase out the oil sands. The United States is Canada's largest energy trading partner, which is an important relat...”

Mr. Pierre Nantel (Longueuil—Saint-Hubert, NDP)

May 4th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...pinion, what kind of debate could we have in order to obtain information on oil production from the oil sands side?”

Mr. Alupa Clarke (Beauport—Limoilou, CPC)

May 4th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...regardless.

The Prime Minister and member for Papineau has said Canada needs to phase out the oil sands. Not only did he say that during the campaign, but he said it again in Paris, before the F...”

Mr. Pierre Nantel (Longueuil—Saint-Hubert, NDP)

May 4th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...e as the cleanest in the world. Honestly, can we talk about the serious problem with developing the oil sands or the tar sands? Let us call them oil sands for some positivity.

What do you think of the new technologies that could make this ...”

Mr. Alupa Clarke

May 4th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...g us that we have the third largest oil reserve in the world? The carbon capture technology for the oil sands is getting better by the day.

We need to improve our environmental practices, I thin...”

Hon. Catherine McKenna (Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Lib.)

May 1st
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...hydro bills, they earn revenue from selling electricity.

Alberta is also home to the Canada's Oil Sands Innovation Alliance, which, through collaboration and the sharing of technologies among co...”

Hon. Catherine McKenna

May 1st
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...e that imposed a carbon tax and is eliminating carbon in that province. He also raised the price on oil sands emissions. These people are working very hard.

We must ensure that we are working fo...”

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs (Lakeland, CPC)

April 30th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...tlines or marine ecology. It is actually only a ban on Canadian oil development and exports, on the oil sands, and on pipelines. It is an attack on the hundreds of thousands of energy workers across t...”

Hon. Jim Carr (Minister of Natural Resources, Lib.)

April 30th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...rkers at Fort McMurray. They actually came from every nook and cranny of the country working in the oil sands. They understand better than everybody else how important the energy sector is for familie...”

Mr. Ron Liepert (Calgary Signal Hill, CPC)

April 30th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...k about what we are listening to, we are listening to the Prime Minister talk about phasing out the oil sands, and we are watching as the Liberals are funding summer student jobs to protest against pi...”

Mr. Ron Liepert (Calgary Signal Hill, CPC)

April 27th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...t week, they saw reports of the Prime Minister speaking in Paris and talking about phasing out the oil sands. That does not give them much hope. Of course that was not the first time he said that.

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs (Lakeland, CPC)

April 19th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...es are concerned that the energy sector is at risk.

The Prime Minister wants to phase out the oil sands. He killed energy east, northern gateway, and the Pacific NorthWest LNG pipeline. When is ...”

Mr. Colin Carrie (Oshawa, CPC)

April 19th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...p>Mr. Speaker, in Ontario, over 1,100 companies and 42,000 jobs depend on the $4.6 billion spent by oil sand producers. Liberal policies have failed energy east, failed northern gateway, and are poise...”

Mr. Colin Carrie (Oshawa, CPC)

April 19th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...is good for Canada, but the question is when is the Prime Minister going to realize that.

The oil sands benefit not only Alberta but all provinces. My province of Ontario receives approximately ...”

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs (Lakeland, CPC)

April 18th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ker, things are actually only going to get worse. The Prime Minister said Canada must phase out the oil sands. He killed northern gateway, energy east, and the Pacific NorthWest LNG project, and he im...”

Hon. Lisa Raitt (Milton, CPC)

April 17th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ct in serious danger. Was the Prime Minister really serious when he said he wanted to phase out the oil sands from the Canadian economy?”

Mr. Matt Jeneroux (Edmonton Riverbend, CPC)

April 17th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister has said he wants to phase out the oil sands. Well, he is doing it.

By introducing Bill C-69 and the carbon tax, the Prime Minist...”


The Senate

Hon. Douglas Black

October 4th
Hansard Link

Impact Assessment BillCanadian Energy Regulator BillNavigation Protection Act Bill to Amend—Second Reading—Debate Continued

“...onsibility to set forth a policy guideline. So if you do not want to have a pipeline built from the oil sands of Alberta to wherever, just tell us. Tell us up front. So policy issues in any sophistica...”

Hon. Rosa Galvez

June 13th
Hansard Link

Natural Resources Trans Mountain Pipeline

“...ject, could you please elaborate on the forecast that has been conducted to assess the value of the oil sands and its present and future impacts on the Canadian economy? Given that China, for example,...”

Hon. Rosa Galvez

April 24th
Hansard Link

Trans Mountain Pipeline Project Bill Second Reading—Debate

“...occurring in Canadian and worldwide oil, gas and energy sectors. (1510) In 1971, there was a single oil sands operation at Fort McMurray which produced 30,000 barrels per day. Since the 1990s, only 40 per cent of oil sands are extracted by Canadian companies, with the remainder by American companies and more recently by foreign corporations. In 2014, oil sands production was 2.3 million barrels per day, representing close to 30 per cent of Alberta’s $300 billion GDP. According to Statistics Canada, 98.5 per cent of the crude oil from oil sands is exported to the U.S. With this reduced diversity and a single product buyer, the economy is subject to the high volatility of crude petroleum. The prices of crude oil decreased from US$140 per barrel in 2009 to US$30 a barrel in 2016. Last December, the Western Canadian Select prices dropped to a low of US$20 a barrel. Alberta’s old mono-economy struggled to thrive in a US$50 per barrel world. In 2016, more than 3 million barrels per day of Canadian crude were sold to the U.S. at bargain basement prices. Divestment from fossil fuel is another major concern for oil sand business. Norway’s trillion-dollar sovereign wealth fund will fully divest of fossil fuel holdings, which may impact Canadian oil and gas equity shares which are valued at US$2.86 billion. This move could impact 61 Canadian oil and gas equities including Suncor, TransCanada, Enbridge, Canadian Natural Resources Ltd., Encana, Cenovus and Imperial Oil. The retreat comes at the same time as large scale sell-offs by international oil sands producers totalling $30 billion, including ConocoPhillips, Royal Dutch Shell, Statoil. And just yesterday, HSBC, the largest bank in Europe, announced that it will no longer finance oil sands projects. The International Energy Agency stated in its World Energy Outlook report that the U.S. could be a net exporter of oil within a decade and is set to become the world’s dominant oil and gas production leader for the following decades. The U.S. is moving from being our partner to being our greatest competitor. Can landlocked unconventional oil sands, which need special refining conditions, compete with lighter conventional crudes from the U.S. which are easier to refine? [Translation] Considering the history of the oil sands, it is rather troubling that fewer than five Canadian refineries can use the oil sands as raw material, while refineries in the Gulf and in the American Midwest have undergone modifications to be able to do so. The new mega-refineries currently being built in Asia and the Middle East have been specifically designed to export refined products. This gives them the flexibility needed to accept the heaviest forms of sulfur-containing crude oil. Given that older refineries are gradually shutting down, complex refineries account for the vast majority of the global refining capacity. The main reason behind the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project is to maximize prices by getting the oil sands to tidewater. However, this oil, which could be sold in Asia, commands a lower price than in the United States, considering the high transportation costs. Furthermore, the OECD recently revealed that growth in Asia has slowed and will remain stable. At the same time, renewable energy consumption in Asia has doubled in a little over two decades. According to the International Renewable Energy Agency, China is investing US$364 billion in renewable energy production. [English] Now, given that the petroleum companies themselves are divesting, that the U.S. will become a net exporter, that Canada does not have oil sands refining capacity, that potential buyers in Asia are moving to renewable energies, that refineries and pipeline companies are foreign owned, and Alberta economic diversification is on a good track, are new pipelines sound decisions or political decisions from an economical perspective? Maybe, but this has to be proven with transparency and due diligence. The proposed $6.8 billion Texas-based Kinder Morgan TMEP and tanker project would triple capacity to 890,000 barrels per day and would increase tanker traffic nearly 700 per cent in Vancouver’s harbour, passing by hundreds of kilometres of beaches, islands and coastal wilderness. Are the economic benefits of the TMEP sufficient to justify the increased risk of environmentally disastrous spills on the B.C. coastline and the additional contribution to climate change resulting from increased bitumen production? The Alberta government advertises that 37,000 direct, indirect and induced jobs will be created per year of operation, as well as 15,000 construction jobs and 1,300 marine sector jobs, while the Conference Board of Canada estimates the creation of 34,000 jobs annually for 20 years. These estimates differ largely from what Kinder Morgan mentions in its own Volume 5B of its NEB submission of 2,500 jobs per year for two years. One thing is certain: When compared with similar pipeline projects, most job creation occurs over the two- to three-year construction period and is around a few thousand. The 60-year-old existing Trans Mountain pipeline has already spilled around 5.5 million litres in 82 separate incidents. It needs replacing. Ships carrying fuel have recently spilled into B.C.’s coastal waters exposing a deficient marine spill response. A spill could put 98,000 coast-dependent jobs, salmon rivers, wildlife, tourism, and the health of coastal residents and ecosystems at great risk. The initial NEB review did not consider either the upstream or downstream greenhouse gas emissions of the project. GHG emissions from oil sands are between 8 and 37 per cent higher than conventional crude. The pipeline is projected to add 13 to 15 million tonnes per year from increased oil sands production. In 2016, the U.S. National Academy of Sciences conducted a thorough study on diluted bitumen spills from pipelines. The study examined physicochemical properties from dilbit, environmental toxicity and spill response planning. To paraphrase the report: dilbit is substantially different from other crude oils in its high density, viscosity and adhesion properties. These chemical and physical properties are relevant to environmental impacts and require modification to regulations for spill response plans and cleanup. Environment Canada jointly with Fisheries and Oceans and Natural Resources Canada have also noted the unique chemistry of oil sands, namely the presence of complex compounds such as n-alkanes, PAH/APAH and saturated biomar...”

Hon. Larry W. Smith (Leader of the Opposition)

April 18th
Hansard Link

Natural Resources Oil and Gas Industry

“... should come as no surprise. However, in January of last year, the Prime Minister said of Alberta’s oil sands: We need to phase them out. If the Prime Minister truly believes Trans Mountain is in the national interest and will be built, if he truly believes and wants Canadian and foreign investors to invest in our country, then why does he continue to speak of transitioning away from our oil sands?”

Hon. Richard Neufeld

April 17th
Hansard Link

Trans Mountain Pipeline Project Bill Second Reading--Debate Continued

“...obs per year of operation. And let us never forget that people from across this country work in the oil sands, even if they reside in Vancouver or Burnaby. Some have argued that the number of construction jobs is only 20 per cent of that amount. That’s still 3,000 construction jobs. Regardless of the number, there is no doubt that the economic spinoffs of this major Canadian energy infrastructure project are massive, including billions in extra government revenues and thousands of good-paying, family-supporting jobs. But if Trans Mountain doesn’t move forward, these jobs are at risk, as is Canada’s reputation. This brings me to another issue I want to address: Canada’s shrinking competitiveness and our lack of appeal to foreign investors. In recent months, some multinationals have essentially said, “Thanks but no thanks” to Canada’s natural resources. Shell and Chevron have divested themselves of their Canadian oil sands portfolios. PETRONAS has cancelled a proposed $36 billion LNG facility on the West Coast. ...”


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