Oil Sand: The Last Six Months
Of Federal Activity

About

This Report

This is a computer-generated report that shows all of the federal activity with respect to the keyword "Oil Sand" over the last six months. This is a demonstration of the power of our government relations automation software.

Hansard

House: 77 Speeches
Senate: 2 Speeches

House Senate

Bills

Active: 1

See Bills

Regulations

Filed: 0
Proposed: 0

The House

Hon. Michelle Rempel

June 7th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... clean technology, carbon capture and sequestration, and things like flocculent development for the oil sands for tailing ponds.

I could go through numerous technologies that are being developed...”

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs (Lakeland, CPC)

June 6th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...cts, putting both at risk; added cost in red tape to oil and gas; and the PM wants to phase out the oil sands. It is political. They say one thing in B.C. and something different in Alberta. Now, a lo...”

Hon. Catherine McKenna

June 6th
Hansard Link

S. O. 57

“...o bills, the family earns revenues from selling electricity.

Alberta is also home to Canada's Oil Sands Innovation Alliance, which through collaboration and the sharing of technologies among com...”

Hon. Steven Blaney (Bellechasse—Les Etchemins—Lévis, CPC)

June 6th
Hansard Link

S. O. 57

“...cerned, I would remind my hon. colleague that it was our Conservative government that put an end to oil sands development subsidies. I would remind her that it was also under a Conservative government...”

Mr. Gérard Deltell (Louis-Saint-Laurent, CPC)

June 6th
Hansard Link

S. O. 57

“...ons by 2%. That is another fact.

Also under our government, greenhouse gas emissions from the oil sands went down by 32%. These planet-friendly, environmentally friendly accomplishments are courtesy of the Conservative government. Need I remind anyone that the targets we set were so sensible that the whole planet adopted them? That is a fact.

However, the only thing the government has to show for its lofty principles is the creation of a new tax, the Liberal carbon tax. This is typical of the Liberals, they who never stop lecturing. Whenever they are faced with a problem, they create a tax. This should come as no surprise, given that under the Chrétien and Martin Liberal governments, greenhouse gas emissions rose by 30%.

Now reality is catching up to them. I cannot repeat this enough. The entire planet has recognized that we, the Conservatives, established the right greenhouse gas reduction targets. Now those folks over there are improvising a Liberal carbon tax and imposing it on the provinces, contrary to what they said earlier. They said they would act collaboratively with the provinces, but that is absolutely not the case.

The Prime Minister said in this very place that he would give the provinces two years to reach an agreement, and if there was no agreement, he would impose the tax. The reality is that the Liberals are imposing it, period. That is the Liberal approach. They impose a tax and punish everyone.

Instead of helping businesses and working with the major polluters on finding positive and constructive solutions, as we did with the oil sands, this government wants to punish everyone. Then it adopts lofty principles, treats the pro...”

Ms. Linda Duncan (Edmonton Strathcona, NDP)

June 5th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ditiously to approve LNG plants, pipelines, and basically back away from a more intensive review of oil sands operations.

We recently received the report from UNESCO where it investigated the impacts of the oil sands and the Site C dam on a world heritage site in northern Alberta. UNESCO has directed that our nation will lose that world heritage site designation unless the government steps up to the plate and starts doing its job and better regulating the impact of the oil sands on the whole Peace-Athabasca Delta. It has called for a second review assessment of the Si...”

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs (Lakeland, CPC)

June 5th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister said he wants to phase out the oil sands and the Liberals will not state the facts, which is that Canada's oil and gas sector is th...”

Mrs. Kelly Block (Carlton Trail—Eagle Creek, CPC)

June 5th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...um act, a bill that his own officials conceded would only impact the future development of Canada's oil sands and no other activity in northern British Columbia. Equally concerning about this oil tank...”

Mr. Mark Strahl (Chilliwack—Hope, CPC)

June 1st
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...ment by the company. It would create 15,000 new jobs during construction, and secondary jobs in the oil sands will be in the thousands as well. We know there is a pipeline capacity issue right now. If...”

Mr. Mark Strahl

June 1st
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...eneficial to Alberta. I know in my own riding there were people who travelled back and forth to the oil sands, leaving their families for weeks and sometimes months at a time, to put food on the table...”

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs (Lakeland, CPC)

June 1st
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“... with the third largest proven oil reserves of any country on earth, the vast majority being in the oil sands. Unlike most major oil producers globally, Canada is a stable and free democracy with the most stringent environmental regulations and enforcement along with human rights, labour standards, and a fundamental philosophy that natural resources belong to citizens, so the wealth derived from energy development benefits the people broadly and in multiple ways. Despite these competitive and capacity advantages, only 4% of the world's daily oil production comes from Canada, which is forced to be a global oil price taker, not a price maker.

These realities are significant because the sustainability and future of oil and gas development in Canada are key to Canada's long-term prosperity overall and to the livelihoods of hundreds of thousands of Canadians across the country right now.

Politics in British Columbia put the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion at risk, with NDP and Green Party leaders pledging to pursue legal action. This $7.4 billion dollar project would create 15,000 jobs in Alberta and B.C. The Conference Board of Canada says it is expected to generate at least $46.7 billion in government revenues and the equivalent of more than 40,000 jobs from economic spinoffs of this single project alone. It would create desperately needed jobs in Alberta while helping grow British Columbia's economy.

Pipelines are crucial economic transportation infrastructure, which Canada needs in all directions to diversify export markets, reduce reliance on the U.S., and enhance Canada's own energy independence and security.

However, the growing inflammatory ideological activism around pipelines threatens prosperity and opportunity for all Canadians, sometimes in the most crass and dishonest ways. Around 32,000 Métis and first nations people work in Canada's natural resource sector. In Lakeland and around Alberta, first nations are very active in oil and gas across the value chain, in upstream exploration and production, and in service, supply, and technology.

However, the Liberals and the left often use first nations as pawns in their anti-energy rhetoric, implying all first nations and Métis people are against it, but AFN Chief Perry Bellegarde confirms that 500 of the 630 first nations in Canada are open to pipelines and support petroleum development. In fact, 50 first nations actively support the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion in particular.

Representing a riding that includes eight first nations and Métis communities in northern rural Alberta, and as a person who happens to be part Ojibwa myself, I am disturbed and disgusted by the left's constant misrepresentation of the perspective on energy development of the majority of first nations in Canada. First nations across western Canada want more pipelines and are increasingly agitating publicly for themselves, because that infrastructure is as crucial to the lifeblood of their communities and to opportunities for young people as anywhere else.

The debate over pipelines in Canada is as much about trust as it is about economics. It has been odd to watch the minister—sometimes aggressively and sometimes just bewildered—express clear frustration that Albertans are just not grateful enough for their pipeline approvals, as if he is not sure why we have the gall to still be so uppity, or as if we are just so hard to please. But the Liberals contradict themselves about oil and gas depending on where they are or to whom they are talking, because for the Liberals, it is about politics. That is why proponents on all sides of the pipeline debate have a hard time believing the Liberal rhetoric. (1035)

The Liberals' anti-Canadian energy agenda is obvious. They froze pipeline applications, delaying them for months, and launched four major regulatory reviews while citing interim measures that did not actually include any new aspects, except for the proposal of attaching upstream emissions to pipeline approvals, a standard they do not apply to any other major infrastructure projects anywhere in Canada, and more layers of administration and costs. This uncertainty deters investment and escalates job losses at the very worst time.

The Prime Minister told the world that Canada will phase out the oil sands and left the Minister of Natural Resources at home during trips in the U.S. focusing on trade and energy; the Minister of Environment and Climate Change, who seems to call the shots, was celebrated by U.S. lobbyists who explicitly oppose Canadian pipelines; and the new chief of staff of the Minister of Natural Resources wants to keep Canadian oil in the ground, while the NEB, one of the most renowned regulators in the world, is being dismantled and sent to Ottawa.

On the same day the Liberals accepted the independent expert recommendation to approve the Trans Mountain and Line 3 expansions, the Prime Minister killed the only actual new proposal to tidewater, the northern gateway pipeline, along with 31 first nations equity partnerships of $2 billion. It was the first time a Prime Minister overruled or rejected a regulator's independent advice, which was based on the exact same process and evidence as the projects approved by the Liberals. Their talk of science and consultation is so empty, just like the tanker ban, which was directed by the Prime Minister in mandate letters before there was a single environmental safety or economic study, and ultimately absolutely no consultation with first nations about the ban, which applies to only one specific coast, astoundingly, because that incoherence is a product of politics and ideology driving policy and legislation.

All Canadians should be concerned when ideological activism dictates government action. A 36-page Elections Canada report confirms the influence of foreign groups on Canadian democracy. At least three groups violated Canadian elections law, circumventing spending limits to push their anti-Canadian energy agenda to serve American business and energy interests. The truth is that many anti-Canadian energy groups are funded by American companies precisely to prevent securing diverse export markets for Canadian oil, but the need to accelerate that access has never been more urgent.

Canadian pipelines are sustainable, safe, and efficient, and 1.25 million more barrels of oil a day are transported across Canada through increased pipeline capacity approved under the previous Conservative government through four major pipelines and several others.

Thousands of Canadians lost their jobs since 2015, with people in some provinces and regions hit harder than others. The $50 billion loss of investment in Canada's energy sector is the equivalent of losing 75% of auto manufacturing and all of the aerospace sector last year.

The economic and social consequences are immense: spikes in bankruptcies, foreclosures, food bank use, crime, domestic violence, family breakdowns, suicides. The losses in the energy sector are rippling through other sectors and across Canada. Pipelines will get people back to work in the near term and will sustain oil and gas, which are also the biggest investors in Canadian renewable and alternative energy development long into the future, yet Albertans in particular cannot seem to get themselves on the Liberals' priority list. The response by the Liberals to out-of-work energy workers is subsidies for other sectors and other countries, handouts to provincial governments, with added roadblocks and conditions to private sector investments like pipelines that would actually create jobs for middle-class Canadians, about whom the Liberals purport to care. The mythical social licence is always just out of reach, and it is now clear that no amount of taxing or begging or grovelling will earn it from those who never intend to grant it.

Oil sands development supports about 400,000 jobs across Canada, with thousands of businesses in eve...”

Mr. Dan Albas

June 1st
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...rt to secure social licence on pipelines. It has been a failed effort, because those who oppose the oil sands will continue to oppose them, regardless of what the Alberta NDP government does.

However, here in this place we have an obligation to represent our citizens in a manner that also strengthens the fabric of the country, and ultimately the Canadian national interest.

In British Columbia there is an added concern about the presence of oil tankers off the west coast of Vancouver Island. Indeed, this Liberal government proposes to ban large tankers off the north coast of British Columbia. I mention large tankers, because of course, the proposed legislation says that smaller tankers are okay, because even those who oppose tankers on the north coast still need them. Because of that, they will get less efficient, smaller tankers.

Getting back to tankers off the west coast of Vancouver Island, there is an international shipping lane off the west coast of Vancouver Island. Just across the border and south of Vancouver, British Columbia, is a place called Cherry Point, Washington, home of a massive refinery. It is a destination for all kinds of large-scale tanker traffic. The bottom line is that tankers ply the waters off Vancouver Island, and will continue to, regardless of any legislation passed in this place or in Victoria. (1150)

The only question is this. Do we allow our resources to be discounted, and our jobs lost solely because some in the United States have figured out a loophole that makes it very easy to send large amounts of money into Canada to oppose not U.S. oil or Saudi Arabian oil but just oil from Canada? I would suggest that this is wrong. It is one of the many reasons I support the Trans Mountain pipeline.

In fact, on a local level, some of the communities in my riding also publicly support the Trans Mountain pipeline. Aside from the job benefits, they stand to get some taxation benefits from the improvements. For a community like Merritt, which was hard hit by the closure of the Tolko lumber mill, these are critically needed jobs and revenues for local government.

Looking at the bigger picture, I also believe that there are times when we need to have a national vision and the leadership to see it through, because that is how we build a stronger Canada. We watch celebrities charter 100-foot yachts and jet around the world. They have a carbon footprint hundreds of times that of normal, everyday citizens. They will fly into Alberta, hire a local jet-fuel-powered Bell helicopter, and then blast us for our oil sands.

We see oil-producing countries with nowhere near the environmental regulations bein...”

Mr. Dan Albas

June 1st
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“Madam Speaker, I first heard this term “social licence” being used in the context of oil sands and pipelines from the Premier of Alberta, Premier Notley, and it has also been used by th...”

Hon. Kevin Sorenson (Battle River—Crowfoot, CPC)

June 1st
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“... western Canada. Many of my constituents work in the oil and gas sector. Some of them worked in the oil sands. I met them when we were campaigning in 2015 in Camrose and Stettler, where they were waiting for the oil sands projects to get going again. They travelled to Fort McMurray. They travelled and worked, a...”

Mr. Robert Sopuck (Dauphin—Swan River—Neepawa, CPC)

June 1st
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...igh standards. As someone who has done environmental assessments of pipelines and has worked in the oil sands directly, one thing I can assure him and all others in the chamber is that every single in...”

Mr. Bob Zimmer (Prince George—Peace River—Northern Rockies, CPC)

June 1st
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...is produced in the safest manner in the world, by whatever method members could name, whether it is oil sands, pipeline, shipping across the ocean, we have the safest regimes in the world.

I would like to speak a bit about what I have learned as part of the B.C.–Yukon caucus and in my critic role for the Asia-Pacific gateway. We heard a presentation from Teekay shipping. These are some of the companies that build double-hulled tankers and actually operate them. At the time that we heard the presentation, there had not been one breach of a double-hulled vessel in the world, yet we see millions and millions of barrels of oil per day transported across our oceans. An incident that happened back in the 1980s caused the whole industry to change its entire perspective on safety, and it has been dramatically changed. We see the staggering amount of shipments that go on per day. It is 60 million barrels per day, pretty much without incident. That is an awful lot of oil going across the ocean without much incident.

I am going to speak about the east coast for a minute, and I will quote another article. This is a great article that I would highly recommend, “Sinking the myth of dangerous West Coast oil tanker traffic”. The author says it quite well, that it is myth, and it really is.

Let’s start on our eastern coasts. Transport Canada data shows that more than 1.6 million barrels of petroleum is safely moved from 23 Atlantic Canada ports each day. Another 500,000 barrels per day moves up the St. Lawrence to Montreal and other Quebec ports. Overall, Eastern Canada’s ports berth some 4,000 inbound petroleum tankers each year without any major incidents. (1250)

What we are talking about on the east coast and the Kinder Morgan project is an increase in tanker traffic. It is a dramatic increase in Vancouver traffic, from five per week to 35 per week. Meanwhile, on the east coast, as I just said, 4,000 inbound petroleum tankers operate each year without a major incident. I just want to highlight this.

We have seen presentations where we have looked at other ports around the world, where literally thousands of tankers move in a harmonious way. It is something to see when one watches on a graphic screen, how many tankers move in a day and do so safely around the world. We are talking about an increase from five to 35 per week.

In talking about the article and the myth of dangerous west coast oil tanker traffic, it is exactly that, a myth.

Most people know that I am a British Columbia member of Parliament. Like a lot of other MPs, I generally fly back on Thursday nights on a flight from Ottawa to Vancouver. It is not just Conservative members on that flight. I see a lot of NDP members, as well, getting on that same airplane. Guess what goes into that airplane to allow it to fly? It is a product that is produced from oil and is called jet fuel. I always find it ironic that members of both the Green Party and the New Democratic Party get on the same plane as I do and protest that very product's development and production. I would use a strong word to describe that, and it is hypocrisy.

I know of no electric airlanes that can fly from Ottawa to Vancouver. We need to develop oil and gas because we need it for our planes, for building smart phones, for almost everything in our modernized world. Would it not be practical to develop our resources but to do it responsibly? We see from the B.C. Green Party and the NDP in B.C., this ridiculous agreement that says they will do their very best to shut down projects like this, yet they still go to the gas station and fill up their vehicles with the product. That does not compute with me.

A person of principle is somebody who stands by a principle. People can have their principles, but they should live by them. If people believe in not supporting any kind of oil and gas development, then they should not use it. It is straightforward. It is fine to have a strong position, but I do not see NDP members in the chamber, or members from the provincial NDP or Green Party, walking back to British Columbia. Given the product that is made from oil from the oil sands and turned into jet fuel that powers the planes that fly those members back and forth from...”

Ms. Elizabeth May (Saanich—Gulf Islands, GP)

June 1st
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...gan project, it refused to hear evidence from Unifor, the largest union representing workers in the oil sands. It refused to hear evidence from Unifor, because the National Energy Board ruled that jobs and the economy were outside its mandate in reviewing the project. Therefore, it cannot be said that the economic impact of this project has been reviewed.

It is interesting to know that what Unifor wanted to present to the National Energy Board was evidence that the Trans Mountain pipeline, Kinder Morgan's expansion, would hurt Canadian jobs and cost Canadian jobs.

I would ask my hon. colleague if he does not agree with me that we should follow the plan for the expansion and development of the oil sands that came from Peter Lougheed. That was the era when the idea was put forward that Alberta...”

Mr. T.J. Harvey (Tobique—Mactaquac, Lib.)

June 1st
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“... Province of Alberta's climate action plan and its 100-megaton cap on greenhouse gas emissions from oil sands development. Meeting our 2030 targets for reducing greenhouse gas emissions will require a...”

Mr. Arnold Viersen

June 1st
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“.... In fact, most jurisdictions around the world look to Alberta specifically for how to manage their oil sands development or petroleum product development.

We have nothing to fear here. In fact,...”

Mr. Luc Berthold (Mégantic—L'Érable, CPC)

June 1st
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“... and Venezuela. Canada has 171 billion barrels of proven oil reserves, including 166 billion in the oil sands. That is important for jobs in Canada. Kinder Morgan's Trans Mountain project could create...”

Ms. Kim Rudd (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources, Lib.)

June 1st
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...need for clean technology and innovation better than Canada's oil and gas sector. There would be no oil sands if it were not for the Canadian ingenuity that found a way to separate oil and sand. That innovative spirit continues today through Canada's Oil Sands Innovation Alliance. It is a formal partnership of 13 leading companies that have invested...”

Mr. Randy Boissonnault (Edmonton Centre, Lib.)

June 1st
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...s is a process that is already under way, as the parliamentary secretary has said, through Canada's Oil Sands Innovation Alliance and a host of other initiatives.

That is why Alberta is legislating limits on oil sands greenhouse gas emissions, creating the conditions for innovation and demonstrating that a ...”

Mrs. Cathy McLeod

June 1st
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“Mr. Speaker, it is important. For example, with the downturn in the oil sands, there are businesses in the riding I represent that have also suffered a downturn because they supplied product to the oil sands. We hear about workers in the Maritimes who have lost their jobs. This is a critically imp...”

Mr. Robert Sopuck (Dauphin—Swan River—Neepawa, CPC)

June 1st
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...ue against pipelines is to argue against community safety.

I had the honour of working in the oil sands for a winter and I lived in a camp. There were senior couples there saving for a dignified retirement, young couples saving for their first home, and a father saving for his child's education. I lived with the workers in the oil sands and they are decent, honest, honourable, hard-working people. Why does the NDP hate workin...”

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall (Yorkton—Melville, CPC)

June 1st
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...work sites. As well, there are looming safety implications for workers in industries like Alberta's oil sands plants and Saskatchewan's potash industry, industries that require thousands of operators ...”

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie

May 31st
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... will be required in the workplaces should Bill C-45 be implemented. I think of the oil fields, the oil sands, the industrial heartland of Alberta. These things are very important.

On many front...”

Mr. John Barlow (Foothills, CPC)

May 19th
Hansard Link

Statements By Members

“...erested in Alberta, Canada's economic engine. The Prime Minister said he was going to phase out the oil sands. He is certainly following through on that threat by dismantling the NEB and moving the re...”

Mr. John Barlow (Foothills, CPC)

May 19th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... B.C. and champion this vital pipeline project, or will he continue on his quest of eliminating the oil sands and killing jobs in Alberta and the rest of Canada?”

Mr. John Barlow (Foothills, CPC)

May 17th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... those recommendations are another hit on Alberta. We know the Liberals want to phase out Alberta's oil sands and we know they want to abandon our energy sector. That ideology was clear in these recom...”

Hon. Jim Carr (Minister of Natural Resources, Lib.)

May 17th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...private sector, to announce significant investments that will lower the carbon footprint within the oil sands. We know that Alberta has been an essential driver of the Canadian economy and will contin...”

Hon. Rona Ambrose (Leader of the Opposition, CPC)

May 16th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister has talked about phasing out the oil sands and now we know how he plans to do it. He is going to slowly but surely kill it with red t...”

Mr. Mark Strahl (Chilliwack—Hope, CPC)

May 16th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... best energy regulator in the world.

The Prime Minister revealed his true feelings toward the oil sands when he said he would phase them out, and he revealed his true feelings toward Alberta whe...”

Kelly McCauley (Conservative)

May 5th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...t will use the tax system to reduce emissions and greenhouse gases, and by extension, phase out the oil sands. The government is fine for hundreds of millions of dollars in bailouts and bonuses for Bombardier to make energy-guzzling, greenhouse gas belching planes, and hundreds of millions in taxpayer dollars for its Ontario auto industry for cars running, surprisingly, on gas. However, for Alberta's energy industry it will use the tax system to phase it out, and make a special effort to tell everyone by placing it right in the budget.

By 2021, Canada will be $102 billion further into debt, which is an average of $4,000 per taxpayer that needs to be paid back. The Liberals promised that this deluge of spending would lead to unprecedented levels of of economic growth. Just one year ago, they were musing about a multiplier effect of three to four times the size of the investment. It turns out they were wrong, and we got 1.7% growth.

The Globe and Mail noted that the bulk of the Liberal deficit spending had not been about infrastructure. It is borrowing for groceries more than the mortgage. The question is whether the Liberals, who have repeatedly moved the goal post, will be able to live within this constraint.

What are those billions actually going toward? Innovation? I wonder if the government knows what innovation means, if it actually has a definition, or if it is just like the middle class. The Liberals do not know what it is, they cannot define it, but it sounds pretty good so they will repeat it a few hundred times and hope something happens.

The budget is innovative though, truly the most innovative budget ever. To prove it to us, the word “innovation” appears more than 200 times in the budget. Unfortunately, simply repeating something does not make it true. We need a plan. We need tangible goals and outcomes and a real means of achieving growth.

The Liberals have announced initiatives thousands of times, indeed over 4,200 times since winning the election in 2015. However, as the parliamentary budget officer noted, even though the government has a penchant for announcing funding, it has completely failed to ensure the money gets out the door. This year alone, over $2 billion in infrastructure funding was allowed to lapse because the government was simply incapable of writing the cheque.

The government will stand and respond breathlessly that at least it is doing something, and demand of us, the opposition, some policy options to counter its own. We have provided those ideas. My Alberta colleagues and I provided very specific recommendations in our Alberta jobs task force report that was submitted to the finance minister. We consulted with over 5,000 Alberta families, small businesses, and stakeholders affected by the economic downturn. By the way, in case anyone is wondering, none of those we consulted said to jack up taxes on the gas and oil industry and phase out the oil sands.

We advised the government of these options provided to us in the jobs task force, w...”

Linda Duncan (NDP)

May 5th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ceeding on with the workers of the province, including in the coal-fired power industry and for the oil sands industry. It is something that the Germans are pursuing with their workers.

If we ar...”

Kelly McCauley (Conservative)

May 2nd
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...leased to rise today to recognize Cody Battershill, a dedicated supporter of Alberta's job-creating oil sands and founder of Canada Action, which runs grassroots campaigns in support of Canada's energy and resource sectors. Members might recognize this organization by the ubiquitous I, heart, oil sands shirts, stickers and buttons.

Many years ago Cody walked by a cosmetic store in Calgary that was encouraging consumers to boycott the oil sands. After researching the protest, Cody quickly found out it was funded by international special interests and extremist environmentalist groups and filled with false and misleading information about the impact of Alberta's industries.

Cody has spent over $100,000 of his own money to fight misinformation on Alberta's oil sands and to educate people about the importance of our natural resource industry.

Unlike the Prime Minister, who wants to phase out the oil sands, I stand with Cody and say I love oil sands.”

Xavier Barsalou-Duval (Bloc Québécois)

May 1st
Hansard Link

Privilege

“...g Ontario's auto industry, which might be okay because all industries need financing, and Alberta's oil sands, which we do not support at all.

Why is it that the federal government regularly dec...”

John Barlow (Conservative)

May 1st
Hansard Link

Privilege

“...elf in the mirror.

We are here 140 days of the year. I compare myself to those working in the oil sands. They go up north for a couple of weeks at a time and then they come home. They do not go ...”

Robert Sopuck (Conservative)

April 10th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ence managing a waste water treatment plant at a paper mill, doing environmental assessments in the oil sands, and many years of experience doing environmental assessments across the country, working ...”

Garnett Genuis (Conservative)

April 5th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...may not always be based on fact. Perhaps a comparison would be some of the images of ducks from our oil sands. A couple of images get sent around the world and there is such misinformation that comes ...”

Mark Strahl (Conservative)

April 5th
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“...s exactly what has happened. We have seen a flight of foreign capital, foreign investment, from the oil sands just in the last number of weeks. Major companies like Statoil, Shell, and ConocoPhillips have abandoned the Canadian oil sands to the tune of tens of billions of dollars.

What does that mean? That means the recovery in the oil sands is more difficult. That means the hundreds of thousands of out-of-work energy workers are ...”

Pat Kelly (Conservative)

April 4th
Hansard Link

The Budget

“...lly pipelines to the west coast, and sent out signals to the international market about phasing out oil sands, the hostility of many members of the Liberal caucus to that industry cannot be denied. Th...”

Ron Liepert (Conservative)

March 24th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...nister of Environment and Climate Change and the Prime Minister, both of whom want to phase out the oil sands and phase out fossil fuels.

When will the Minister of Natural Resources start to sta...”

Wayne Stetski (NDP)

March 23rd
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“...concern about a number of aspects of the park, including the Site C dam in British Columbia and the oil sands and their impact on water.

What would happen to Banff National Park if additional de...”

Monique Pauzé (Bloc Québécois)

March 9th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...lls us that this Prime Minister is the prime minister of oil companies. He is the prime minister of oil sands, dirty energy and pipelines.

While the polluters are paying tribute to the Prime Min...”

Linda Duncan (NDP)

February 23rd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...ort the people who work in those communities. Many workers in the oil and gas sector, including the oil sands sector, started their own organizations and are calling on the government to actually fina...”

Shannon Stubbs (Conservative)

February 23rd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...on levy specifically on heavy industrial emitters, and only on heavy industrial emitters, including oil sands producers. That was in 2003.

Alberta leads Canada with biofuels and off-gas capture ...”

Jonathan Wilkinson (Liberal)

February 23rd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...apture and storage, next generation biofuels, advanced batteries for electric vehicles, and cleaner oil sands extraction processes among many others.

In 2014, Canada's clean technology sector sp...”

Robert Sopuck (Conservative)

February 23rd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“Madam Speaker, I happen to have had the honour of working in the oil sands myself, doing environmental monitoring in the winter of 2009-10. Regarding the oil sands, the total aerial extent of the oil sands is 143,000 square kilometres, of which 700 square kilometres have been exploited and 70 sq...”

Monique Pauzé (Bloc Québécois)

February 23rd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“... Syncrude oil company guilty in connection with the deaths of 1,600 ducks in a tailings pond at its oil sands site. I would also like to remind him that most experts around the world are saying that w...”

Elizabeth May (Green Party)

February 23rd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...had to be cleaned up at a cost of $400 million, or whether it is the future cost of cleaning up the oil sands tailings ponds, or whether it is overloading our global atmosphere with warming gases that threaten, and I am not using hyperbole here as this is actually what is at risk, human civilization itself, this is not a free good, so we have to put a price on it so our free market system can actually pay attention to it. It almost does not matter, in response to the member for Calgary Nose Hill, whether we have elasticity of price or not. There is such a demand for gasoline that we would have to put a huge carbon price on to affect the demand for gasoline.

That is not the point of a carbon price. A carbon price is to make sure there is a signal at almost any level that this will cost something. It is to try to create some incentive, but on its own it is not enough. We need regulations and we need other plans. We need to bring on renewable energy so that we can decarbonize all of our electricity. That is a top priority. Ontario did it first, but others need to do it.

What kind of institutions favour a carbon tax? Looney left-wing ones? No. The International Monetary Fund says that every country needs to put in place a carbon price and eliminate fossil fuel subsidies. This was a promise in the Liberal platform that we need to see executed. It has not happened yet. We still have fossil fuel subsidies for liquefied natural gas and dwindling but still in the oil sands. The World Bank also favours carbon pricing and the elimination of fossil fuel subsidies. ...”

Dan Albas (Conservative)

February 23rd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...ht. Recently the Prime Minister stated that he believed that Canada needed to phase out the Alberta oil sands. Of course, that was before he decided to say while visiting Alberta that he misspoke. I m...”

Wayne Stetski (NDP)

February 21st
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...as to whether Wood Buffalo should keep its status due to the Site C dam in British Columbia and the oil sands in Alberta.

The smallest national park is Georgian Bay Islands National Park at 14 s...”

Pat Kelly (Conservative)

February 17th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...n a prime minister, who signals policy intent with every public statement, tells one group that the oil sands have to be phased out and boasts to others about approving pipelines, investors get confus...”

Kelly McCauley (Conservative)

February 13th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...lberta's metals and minerals sectors include natural gas, conventional oil, coal, minerals, and the oil sands. More specifically, Alberta's metal refinery and mineral sector is a foundational industry...”

Shannon Stubbs (Conservative)

February 10th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...carbon tax on everything, and now apparently a plan to phase out world-class energy production. The oil sands provides 425,000 jobs for Canadians and partnerships with thousands of businesses across Canada. Every one job in the oil sands creates 2.5 jobs from coast to coast. Any other world leader would value this strategic as...”

Glen Motz (Conservative)

February 10th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...g my question to the Minister of Justice, my iPad was in front of me, which has an “I support the oil sands” sticker. It was not meant as a prop, and I apologize to the House.”

Matt Jeneroux (Conservative)

February 8th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...and again because that gave us great stuff. However, the comment that he made about phasing out the oil sands takes us back to the 1970s and a prime minister back then saying very similar things, who ...”

Linda Duncan (NDP)

February 8th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“..., but surely, I can put the question to my colleagues.

I am hearing from Albertans, including oil sands workers. They are fed up with the boom and bust oil economy.

I am saying this in all...”

Pat Kelly (Conservative)

February 8th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... Stop scaring away investors, and the jobs they create through mixed messages about phasing-out the oil sands. Stop playing politics with the National Energy Board.

Simply declare that the gover...”

Linda Duncan (NDP)

February 8th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...recommended shift in government investment. One example is iron and earth. This is an initiative by oil sands workers who are boilermakers, electricians, pipefitters, ironworkers, and labourers committed to incorporating more renewable energy projects into their work scope to ensure a more sustainable energy future for Canadians. Oil sands workers say their skills match well with those needed for the renewable and energy efficie...”

Jim Carr (Liberal)

February 8th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...mber, or choose to forget, that it was innovation that found a way to extract fossil fuels from the oil sands in the first place. We have an awful lot of confidence in the entrepreneurship and the inn...”

Linda Duncan (NDP)

February 8th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ing industry. As the minister has said, Albertans have shown they can use innovation to develop the oil sands. The geothermal industry and a lot of economists are now saying to use that same innovatio...”

Darshan Singh Kang (Liberal)

February 8th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...40 million going toward innovation and technology. Does the member know what got the oil out of the oil sands, to begin with? It was innovation and technology.

We are trying to diversify the eco...”

Kelly McCauley (Conservative)

February 8th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...eral members' silence is deafening.

When the Prime Minister stated he wanted to phase out the oil sands, he was rightly and roundly criticized for such a blatantly inane remark, although I note ...”

Tom Kmiec (Conservative)

February 8th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ave done nothing.

Does that member agree with the Prime Minister that we should phase-out the oil sands?”

Kent Hehr (Liberal)

February 8th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...y since taking office, transitioning to low carbon sources of energy, and working directly with the oil sands. That is our commitment to the people of Alberta, and we have been delivering time and tim...”

Blake Richards (Conservative)

February 8th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...in our oil and gas sector right now.

The construction of pipelines and the development of our oil sands in an environmentally sustainable way is absolutely vital for the economy in Alberta and all across Canada. However, instead of supporting this key sector, we have the Prime Minister making comments about phasing out the oil sands, while giving out corporate welfare to Bombardier. To make matters worse, the Liberals wil...”

Rodger Cuzner (Liberal)

February 8th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ments and with industry to grow opportunities. When I started there, it was only the Great Canadian Oil Sands and then Syncrude opened up. There was only Suncor and Syncrude. In 2003, Suncor opened up...”

Candice Bergen (Conservative)

February 8th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...nvestors particularly, is that we have a Prime Minister who says that maybe we should shut down the oil sands, let us introduce a carbon tax, and maybe we do not like pipelines. That is what the probl...”

Nick Whalen (Liberal)

February 8th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...o many tens of thousands of Newfoundlanders and their families with open arms, who helped build the oil sands and have great jobs there. Many of them are now struggling, returning home to Newfoundland and Labrador looking for new employment.

Does the member not appreciate the value of our having approved pipelines that are going to employ 25,000 skilled labourers working in constructing these pipelines? Will he not at least acknowledge that these are steps in the right direction? Does he not agree that we need to get our resources to market? These jobs are going to be valuable. They are jobs in the very skilled trades that are being laid off in the oil sands at the present time.”

Garnett Genuis (Conservative)

February 8th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...l be. It will involve significant technological change and advancement, just as we have seen in the oil sands over the last number of years.

The incredible advances with respect to environmental...”

Kim Rudd (Liberal)

February 8th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...omies is important for any country, including Canada, and we are certainly working toward that. The oil sands, particularly, and the resource sector are leaders in that area.

Are you suggesting ...”

Richard Cannings (NDP)

February 8th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... Canadian oil is expensive to extract and refine, since it is almost all in the form of bitumen and oil sands.

While we heard a lot of testimony at committee on the very innovative work the indu...”

John Barlow (Conservative)

February 8th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...nada, in my own opinion, is our entrepreneurship, our risk-taking mentality. That is what drove the oil sands, a very unique industry in the world.

We have also talked about diversifying Alberta's economy tonight, as if all it has is oil and gas. Alberta has one of the most diversified economies in all of Canada. To talk about Alberta, we should talk about our coal industry, our forestry sector, our agriculture sector. There is a reason that everybody knows about Alberta beef. We have an incredibly diverse economy.

What we have seen over the last year and a half is that Alberta entrepreneurship, that Alberta advantage being sucked dry by a provincial NDP government, which has implemented a carbon tax, increases to minimum wage, increases in taxes on small businesses and entrepreneurs, and a federal Liberal government that is doubling down on that. Despite a very difficult time in our energy sector, they are plowing ahead with additional carbon taxes on Alberta's energy industry. Not only is it Alberta's energy industry but it is an energy industry which is a nation builder. It impacts every province across this country.

I spent several days in Nova Scotia earlier this year, and it was amazing how many people came up to me and said that we needed to do something to get energy east up and running. They said that they were depending on that. Their friends and family had been flying back and forth to the oil sands in northern Alberta, but now there was nothing there for them. They are back in Nova Scoti...”

Kim Rudd (Liberal)

February 8th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...anada's oil and gas sector. That can-do spirit continues in the industry today through the Canada's Oil Sands Innovation Alliance. It is a formal partnership of 13 leading companies that have invested...”

Shannon Stubbs (Conservative)

February 3rd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister told an audience in Peterborough that he plans to phase out the oil sands. That was tough news for the 425,000 Canadians who rely on the oil sands and related businesses for their paycheques. However, they are not the only ones who should be worried. The Prime Minister's policies are making life more expensive for families, and costing them their jobs across the board, not only in the oil sands. Can the Prime Minister explain why he is more focused on phasing out jobs than on creatin...”

Shannon Stubbs (Conservative)

February 1st
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“... Canada's energy is the most environmentally and socially responsible oil and gas in the world. The oil sands give jobs and prosperity to every region in Canada, but the Prime Minister wants to “phase them out”.

Here is what the oil sands mean for Canada: $4 trillion for the economy, $490 billion in transfer payments, and 905,000 direct, indirect, and induced jobs over the next 20 years. Every one job in the oil sands creates 2.5 jobs across Canada. More than 3,400 businesses, 145 in the Maritimes, over 300 each in Quebec and B.C., and over 1,500 in Ontario. The Prime Minister suggest the oil sands pit the environment against the economy, but he is wrong, and the world-class technology that unlocked the oil sands will drive future energy technologies.

The world will keep needing oil and gas for g...”


The Senate

Hon. Percy Mockler

June 21st
Hansard Link

Energy East Pipeline Francophone Services

“...anslation]

The oil and gas industry is Canada's largest private sector investor, with the oil sands alone injecting $23 billion into the overall economy. If we want to continue to grow our e...”

Hon. Thanh Hai Ngo

March 29th
Hansard Link

International Trade China—Free Trade Negotiations—Human Rights

“...ree trade talks, including an end to restricting or barring these enterprises from investing in the oil sands.

In this interview, he said that China has no interest in talking about...”


Active Bills

Bill C-41


An Act for granting to Her Majesty certain sums of money for the federal public administration for the fiscal year ending March 31, 2018
LEGISInfo Link

Bill Status: Royal Assent

“...urveys; (c) regulatory services; (d) monitoring services, including monitoring services with respect to the oil sands; (e) entry fees; (f) permits; and (g) real property services ...”


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