Nuclear: The Last Six Months
Of Federal Activity

About

This Report

This is a computer-generated report that shows all of the federal activity with respect to the keyword "Nuclear" over the last six months. This is a demonstration of the power of our government relations automation software.

Hansard

House: 48 Speeches
Senate: 9 Speeches

House Senate

Bills

Active: 0

Regulations

Filed: 0
Proposed: 0

The House

Scott Brison (Liberal)

March 21st
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...s of the total of the amount of Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety Vote 1, Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission Vote 1, Department of Health Vote 10 and Public Health Agency of Canada Vo...”

Tony Clement (Conservative)

March 20th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...t the major powers guaranteed the sovereignty and the borders of Ukraine at the time it gave up its nuclear arsenal at the breakup of the Soviet Union. Perhaps the hon. member could delve into that a ...”

James Bezan (Conservative)

March 20th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...tners, who all said that they would honour the sovereign territory of Ukraine if they gave up their nuclear warheads. It was the second-largest arsenal in the world, even ahead of the United States at that time. They gave it all up. Where did most of those nuclear warheads go? They ended up back in Russia to be dismantled, to be disposed of.

How wer...”

MaryAnn Mihychuk (Liberal)

March 20th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... sector of mineral exploration. In addition, I took a tour of Chernobyl, the world's largest single nuclear disaster.

We are continuing to build our connections with Ukraine, not only military o...”

Hélène Laverdière (NDP)

March 7th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...orth Korea's actions, it is more important than ever for the international community to work toward nuclear disarmament.

It is not enough to hide behind the treaty to ban the production of fissile materials. We need to be more ambitious if we want to eliminate this threat.

My question is simple. Will Canada participate in the negotiations on nuclear disarmament taking place in New York this month, yes or no?”

Chrystia Freeland (Liberal)

March 7th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...or her question.

We are working hard to ensure that our children will inherit a world free of nuclear weapons. That means making tangible progress. Under our government, for the first time, Canada rallied 177 states to support a United Nations resolution calling for a fissile material cut-off treaty. That is real action, a major step toward a world free of nuclear weapons.”

Randall Garrison (NDP)

February 24th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...ates are not defensible.

Canada should oppose Trump's cavalier remarks about proliferation of nuclear weapons and other advanced weapons systems by refusing to participate in the U.S. ballistic ...”

Elizabeth May (Green Party)

February 23rd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...t to address this conflation of electricity prices in Ontario, which have a lot to do with stranded nuclear debt, a lot to do with institutional problems within Ontario Hydro, and equating them with t...”

Elizabeth May (Green Party)

February 23rd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...impose on every province the bad energy decisions made by Ontario Hydro for generations in building nuclear plants that created billions of dollars of stranded debt.

If we look at the breakdown of electricity prices for Ontario, and I urge everyone to google it and have a look, the number one price is the cost of generation, of course. Then there is the cost of distribution. The next biggest price, over $1 billion a year, is retiring the debt. This is related not to green energy but to nuclear energy.

There has also been a great deal of nonsense about the B.C. carbon prices and ...”

David McGuinty (Liberal)

February 23rd
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...ver and yet we have another organization like Atomic Energy of Canada dealing with the challenge of nuclear waste also along the shores of the Ottawa River, we have these different stressors at play b...”

Elizabeth May (Green Party)

February 22nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“..., and ban landmines. Just last week the organizational meetings began for the next frontier: to ban nuclear weapons. But Canada was not there, while 101 other countries were. I would like to ask if the hon. Prime Minister can assure this House that Canada will play a leading role once again to band with the world to end the threat of nuclear war.”

Matt DeCourcey (Liberal)

February 22nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...er and all Canadians that we are working hard to ensure that our children inherit a world free from nuclear weapons, but that requires real concrete action. That is what Canada is doing for the first time ever. Let me be clear, that it was the first time ever that Canada rallied 177 states to support a resolution calling for a fissile material cut-off treaty. This is genuine and tangible change, and this will help phase out nuclear weapons and allow us to get to a world free from nuclear weapons for our children.”

Colin Carrie (Conservative)

February 10th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... community of Oshawa there are many people in the energy business. We have had great leaders in the nuclear business. Ukraine and Canada also share vast resources, whether through natural gas or oil. ...”

Ben Lobb (Conservative)

February 8th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...ars ago was awarded the U.S. Congressional Gold Medal.

Charles was also one of Canada's first nuclear operators. Charles served the community of Kincardine with distinction for over 20 years on ...”

Cheryl Gallant (Conservative)

February 6th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... the 1990s that resulted in cuts to health care and the decade of darkness for our military and the nuclear industry.

In my riding of Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke, we have some of the most inn...”

Anthony Housefather (Liberal)

December 6th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...them the Simpsons.

The Simpsons are five people. There is a father named Homer. He works in a nuclear power plant and is the sole income earner of the family. His wife's name is Marge. She is a stay-at-home mom, and they have three children, Bart, Lisa, and a little baby named Maggie.

Homer earns approximately $85,000 a year in the nuclear power plant. That is the sole income for the Simpson family. Homer will now see an added 1.5...”

Hélène Laverdière (NDP)

December 5th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... this week marks the sixth anniversary of the unanimous vote in the House of Commons in favour of a nuclear weapons convention. Unfortunately, a few weeks ago, the Liberal government changed its position and voted against negotiations for such a convention.

The United Nations is soon going to vote on this issue again. Will the Liberal government work with the international community and vote in favour of negotiations for a nuclear weapons convention?”

Pam Goldsmith-Jones (Liberal)

December 5th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, our goal is to convince those countries that have nuclear weapons to be at the table as part of disarmament discussions. We did that when we recently led a UN resolution supported by 177 states. Our resolution has a goal to stop the production of materials used to make nuclear weapons and rally nuclear and non-nuclear states alike toward the realization of a fissile material cut-off treaty. This is the realistic, pragmatic approach to nuclear disarmament and a major accomplishment.”

Peter Kent (Conservative)

December 1st
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...Then armed and emboldened as a proxy of the Soviet Union, Castro enabled the installation of Soviet nuclear missiles in Cuba, which precipitated one of the most perilous moments of the Cold War. Throu...”

Tom Kmiec (Conservative)

December 1st
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...erers, oppressors as bad as Batista, and let us not forget both of them brought the world closer to nuclear war than it has ever been since. Just as one cannot kill one's way to a better society, one ...”

Hélène Laverdière (NDP)

December 1st
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“... government going to change the law? All indications are that it will not.

Let us talk now of nuclear disarmament. Suddenly, Canada does not want to participate in the international efforts that would allow us to live in a world free of nuclear weapons. There is nothing on this issue.

The government says it is being open and tran...”

Peter Van Loan (Conservative)

December 1st
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...ng at the time. The fear was palpable.

It was Castro who brought this world closest to global nuclear annihilation with his reckless actions in the Cuban missile crisis, when John F. Kennedy, th...”

Tony Clement (Conservative)

December 1st
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...tting to remind the House of the 13 days in October 1962 when the world was brought to the brink of nuclear destruction. (1515)

Having embarrassed Soviet Russia, Castro gladly invited Russian intermediate-range nuclear missiles onto Cuban soil. He had no qualms about the Soviets mounting a first strike, which ...”

Hélène Laverdière (NDP)

November 18th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, last month, a UN committee voted in favour of complete nuclear disarmament. Unfortunately, Canada did not support that initiative. While other countries are moving forward and working hard on this file, this government is dragging its feet.

Will Canada show some leadership, support the efforts being made toward nuclear disarmament, and participate in the negotiation process that will begin next year?”

Pam Goldsmith-Jones (Liberal)

November 18th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, the minister is entirely dedicated to nuclear disarmament. Our goal is to convince countries that have nuclear weapons to be at the table as part of an effective disarmament process. Canada succeeded at this recently when we led a United Nations resolution supported by 177 states, including those with nuclear weapons.

Our resolution has a goal to stop the production of materials used to make nuclear weapons. This is the realistic, pragmatic approach our minister is taking, and it is a major...”

John Barlow (Conservative)

November 3rd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“... Leslie and Tyerman. This is the minister for natural resources, mining, oil and gas, forestry, and nuclear energy. The expertise of this law firm with which he had a private meeting just happens to b...”

Richard Cannings (NDP)

November 3rd
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“...23, I rose in this place to ask the Minister of Natural Resources a question regarding the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, concerns raised by whistleblowers in the agency, and the response to them by CNSC president Michael Binder. These whistleblowers made very serious allegations about the lack of due diligence and the work of the CNSC, which in turn raised very serious questions about the CNSC's impartiality and its concern for safety.

In response, at a meeting on August 17, the CNSC president actually questioned whether the whistleblower letter was in fact genuine. A report by Mike De Souza of the National Observer, quoted Mr. Binder in that meeting as saying:

So I’m listening to all of you and then the question is was this letter written by our staff?...Because the conclusion...is completely diametrically opposed to anything in this particular letter.

This apparently prompted laughter from some of the staff. When another staff member questioned the expertise of whoever wrote the letter, Binder decided to make a joke of it, “So if you’re correct, we’re into a conspiracy theory,” Binder said, drawing more laughter.”

The president of our nuclear safety regulatory agency, when faced with serious questions about his department, decided to make jokes about it. That was simply inappropriate on his part, and I have yet to hear the minister say as much anywhere on the public record.

Further to this, the environment commissioner's most recent report also raised many concerns about the CNSC, validating many of the concerns raised by these whistleblowers. The commissioner pointed out that three-quarters of site safety inspections were carried out without an approved guide. She compared that to a pilot taking off on a flight without going through a safety checklist.

As the commissioner said on the day of the release of her report:

This kind of lack of precision in a precision industry I think is really not acceptable...These mistakes should not happen when we're dealing with nuclear power plants.

With all of these issues that have come forward in the past months, I be...”

Kim Rudd (Liberal)

November 3rd
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“...hat our government place the highest priority on health, safety, and security as they relate to the nuclear industry in Canada. I am proud to say that we do. We expect the work of the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission to be safety focused, and we expect the commission to operate in a way that is transparent and open to hearing the concerns of others. We are committed to ensuring that Canada's nuclear sector remains a dynamic industry committed to the highest standards of safe, secure, and reliable operations because nothing else will do.

Canada's nuclear regulator plays a central role in all of this. The CNSC regularly undergoes external peer reviews by international nuclear experts, including those from the United Nations' International Atomic Energy Agency to allow for the sharing of best practices and to verify the high standards of its operations.

In order to ensure that the CNSC has the technical capacity to regulate the nuclear industry, more than 80% of employees in mid- and senior-level positions have degrees in nuclear engineering, chemistry, physics, and environmental and radiation science fields. Canada has established one of the most stringent nuclear regulatory regimes in the world, and it is the responsibility of the commission to oversee its implementation and to ensure that Canada's nuclear industry meets the highest standards of safety and security.

That being said, the anonymous letter received by the CNSC raised important issues that would concern any Canadian. That is why the CNSC took immediate action to review those claims. The resulting report, presented at the commission's public meeting in August, was reviewed by the commissioners, who had a chance to ask questions of nuclear safety experts regarding the content of the letter.

Other issues raised, such as a way for employees to voice technical and scientific disagreements are also taken seriously by the CNSC. As a science-based organization whose success depends on hiring and retaining technical experts, the organization encourages its staff to provide their best professional judgments in the review of nuclear licences and other related activities. On occasion, this can result in differences of professional opinion, which is why the CNSC has mechanisms for staff to discuss those disagreements. Resolving scientific differences of opinion in a productive way is crucial to the CNSC being able to carry out its mandate. CNSC has those mechanisms in place to address such disagreements.

It is my expectation and that of the minister that the CNSC and its staff keep the health and safety of Canadians as their highest priority and that they operate in an open and transparent manner to ensure Canadians can have full confidence in our nuclear industry.”

Richard Cannings (NDP)

November 3rd
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“...nt in any organization that there are employees with the highest qualifications, but certainly in a nuclear power plant that is even more important.

However, what is as important or more so is the culture of the workplace in these organizations. This is what we really need to see change at the top in CNSC and to get a sense from the new commissioners that we need a new culture. Canadians expect safety in any workplace, but these are nuclear power plants. We really expect the very best.”

Kim Rudd (Liberal)

November 3rd
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“Mr. Speaker, I appreciate that the member opposite expects that the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission operate in the best interests of Canadians. I want to repeat and reassure all Canadians that our government believes the health and safety of Canadians is the single most important consideration related to activities of the nuclear industry in Canada.

I also want to respond to the member's concern around appointments...”

Cheryl Gallant (Conservative)

November 2nd
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“Mr. Speaker, the following are the recipients of the 2016 Canadian Nuclear Laboratories Awards of Excellence: the Torgerson Discovery Award: Tony Clouthier, Zhe Liang, and Reilly MacCoy for their work on hydrogen safety in nuclear power plants, and Youssef Ismail, Dmitry Klokov, Soji Sebastian, and Yi Wang for their work with radiobiological research; the Distinguished Merit Award: Robby Baidwan, Ian Donohue, Thomas Heale, Mitch King, Andrew Kittmer, Kevin Milks, and Terry Schaubel on specialized tooling to access the NPD reactor vault for general inspections; the Distinguished Merit Award: Jeremy Buck, Steven Hogg, Dag Horn, Colin Kramer, Jia Lei, and Brian Lepine on the inspection technique probe design for metal thicknesses in nuclear facilities using a non-contact electromagnetic method; and the Distinguished Merit Award: Jason Heal, Patrick Mansfield, and Tyler White for leading the return of the U2 loop to service in NRU, key to CNL 's ability to declare itself a full capability technology developer.

Canadians can be proud of the advanced state of nuclear science that is being developed in Canada.”

Pam Goldsmith-Jones (Liberal)

October 28th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...f fissile material. This is a critical, tangible step toward our ultimate goal of a world free from nuclear weapons.

The resolution, which passed with the overwhelming support of 177 United Nations member states, will restrict production and access to the material necessary to create nuclear weapons. This is universally regarded as the next logical move toward nuclear disarmament. Both nuclear states, such as China and Russia, as well as non-nuclear states are on board.

Canada's policy of engagement is welcomed, it is needed, and we a...”

Hélène Laverdière (NDP)

October 27th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, the UN is preparing to vote on a resolution to ban nuclear weapons. Over a hundred countries support this initiative, but not Canada.

In the past, the Liberals argued in favour of a ban on nuclear weapons, here in the House in 2010 and at their party convention earlier this year. When the Liberals were in opposition, they were in favour of nuclear disarmament.

Why are the Liberals now refusing to support initiatives to ban these dev...”

Pam Goldsmith-Jones (Liberal)

October 27th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, our government is a long-standing supporter of the nuclear test ban treaty, and we will continue to work toward a world free of nuclear weapons in the most effective way possible.

It is fairly important to note that no nuclear power is supporting the motion, but Canada is working toward a real workable and effective solution that will bring all nuclear powers together. We remain committed to a world free of nuclear weapons in the most effective way possible.”

Erin Weir (NDP)

October 27th
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“...ay clock set at three minutes to midnight. I am proud of the role the NDP has played as a voice for nuclear disarmament and peace, but this should not be a partisan issue. Canada as a whole should be working for nuclear disarmament and peace. Unfortunately, the Liberal government has obstructed UN efforts to ban nuclear weapons and continues to take a provocative stand versus Russia.

Our country needs a b...”

Elizabeth May (Green Party)

October 25th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...ing situation in arms control. Globally, we have seen an alarming development in states modernizing nuclear weapons for what they describe as tactical purposes. This may remind some of my colleagues of Dr. Strangelove.

We simply cannot use nuclear weapons. Rather, we should be disarming globally. A working group this summer in the United Nations is working to present, for the United Nations, a 2017 negotiation of a treaty with the goal of eliminating nuclear weapons. I do not understand how it could have happened, but in August Canada voted against taking that to the UN General Assembly.

It is going to the UN General Assembly. Another vote will take place in as little as a few days' time. It is critically important that Canada stand with those who want to ensure we have a world without nuclear weapons.”

Kelly Block (Conservative)

October 5th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ydro dams, nor do we have the population size or density, for that matter, to make the economics of nuclear power viable. To my knowledge, combines do not run on solar power. In any year with lower th...”

Thomas Mulcair (NDP)

October 4th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“....[English]

This summer, I wrote to the Minister of Natural Resources, asking him to look into nuclear safety concerns. He not only refused, but he passed the buck to the CNSC president, who actually made jokes about these serious safety issues.

Today the environment commissioner released a report that highlights critical problems with nuclear safety in Canada.

Would the Prime Minister explain his minister's inaction on this fil...”

Justin Trudeau (Liberal)

October 4th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, Canadians know that this government takes very seriously the question of nuclear safety and security. That is why we welcome the report from the commissioner.

We will continue to work to ensure that Canada has the highest standards on nuclear safety and security. That is what Canadians expect.”

Thomas Mulcair (NDP)

October 4th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...neva, Switzerland in August. Members should brace themselves. This Liberal government voted against nuclear disarmament in Geneva. Members heard correctly. This is yet another example of the Liberals ...”

James Bezan (Conservative)

October 3rd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...r military confrontation or buildup,” here is what Russia is doing. It is building a new fleet of nuclear-powered submarines and icebreakers. It is performing snap military exercises in the north. I...”

Marilyn Gladu (Conservative)

October 3rd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ants. Canada could help improve the situation by using alternatives, such as liquefied natural gas, nuclear energy, and renewable energy. Promoting carbon sequestration and biotechnology will create h...”

Pam Goldsmith-Jones (Liberal)

September 29th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...orld. Canada controls the export of not only military goods but also dual-use goods and technology, nuclear goods and technology, goods and technology pertaining to missiles and unmanned aerial vehicl...”

Peter Kent (Conservative)

September 29th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...le for the city of Aleppo.

It remains to be seen today whether Iran will comply with the P5+1 nuclear agreement, even as the regime continues to ignore UN resolutions against the development of ...”

Garnett Genuis (Conservative)

September 29th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...n poses in terms of stability for the region. There is a shared concern, in fact, about the Iranian nuclear deal.

These are interesting things to observe in how we relate to the Saudis. Above al...”

Sheila Malcolmson (NDP)

September 29th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...ing activist organization within our community, was talking about the UN vote that was coming up on nuclear disarmament. They shared my optimism that, given the campaign commitments around peace and security and restoring Canada's international reputation on the world stage, our Prime Minister was going to direct that Canada vote in favour of negotiations to end the nuclear weapons trade.

However, sadly, last month, Canada voted against negotiations for a global treaty banning nuclear weapons. It was shameful. It was a shock to everybody. These nuclear negotiations had been called for by UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon; 68 countries ended up voting in favour of the motion, so Canada was on the outside of that international consensus; and the vote was called “the most significant contribution to nuclear disarmament in two decades” by one of the UN member countries.

The Liberal government's vote last month also flew in the face of a 2010 resolution, in this House, encouraging the Canadian government to join negotiations for a nuclear weapons convention. The motion was adopted unanimously in this House and in the Senate, with...”

Kevin Lamoureux (Liberal)

September 29th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“.... That would include things like chemicals that could be used in chemical warfare. It also includes nuclear-related things. The Government of Canada is aware of many different things and that is one o...”

Jenny Kwan (NDP)

September 29th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...s with a Tamil background.

The second is Dr. Elagu Elaguppillai. After obtaining his Ph.D. in nuclear physics from the University of Toronto, he travelled the world as a scholar and tenured professor in Malaysia and Zambia before returning to the University of Toronto. He has contributed immensely to Canada through his work at the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, as well as being the Canadian expert at the International Atomic Energy Agency.

My third example is Logan Kanapathi. Mr. Kanapathi is the first person of Tamil heritage elected to government in Canada. In 2006, he became part of our history when he became the first Tamil Canadian to be elected to public office when he won a seat as a city councillor in Markham, Ontario.

Those are just three examples of the contributions that Tamil Canadians have made to our country, like so many groups coming to Canada, looking for a home that would allow them to thrive. Thankfully, many are able to find that in Canada and we all benefit. Whether it is the novel that we cannot put down, the local city councillor who listens to the concerns of the community, or a nuclear physicist ensuring that Canadian nuclear power plants are safe, the contributions of Tamil Canadians highlight not only their rich ba...”


The Senate

Hon. Joseph A. Day (Leader of the Senate Liberals)

December 15th
Hansard Link

Republic of Kazakhstan Twenty-fifth Anniversary of Independence

“... to this day, continue to grow. Recently, in August of 2014, both Kazakhstan and Canada signed the Nuclear Cooperation Agreement facilitating the full bilateral cooperation between our two countries...”

Hon. Diane Bellemare (Legislative Deputy to the Government Representative in the Senate)

December 5th
Hansard Link

The Senate Statutes Repeal Act—Motion to Resolve that the Act and the Provisions of Other Acts not be Repealed—Debate Continued

“...re act and the provision of another act. The first recommendation has to do with the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty Implementation Act. We can bring this act into force once the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty comes into force. However, that treaty needs to be ratified by 44 nations b...”

Hon. Diane Bellemare (Legislative Deputy to the Government Representative in the Senate)

December 2nd
Hansard Link

The Senate Statutes Repeal Act—Motion to Resolve that the Act and the Provisions of Other Acts not be Repealed—Debate Adjourned

“...t, S.C. 1996, c. 17:

-sections 17 and 18;

4. Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty Implementation Act, S.C. 1998, c. 32;

5. Preclearance Act, S....”

Hon. Diane Bellemare (Legislative Deputy to the Government Representative in the Senate)

December 1st
Hansard Link

The Senate Statutes Repeal Act—Notice of Motion to Resolve that the Act and the Provisions of Other Acts not be Repealed

“...t, S.C. 1996, c. 17:

-sections 17 and 18;

4. Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty Implementation Act, S.C. 1998, c. 32;

5. Preclearance Act, S....”

Hon. Peter Harder (Government Representative in the Senate)

November 28th
Hansard Link

Foreign Affairs The Late Fidel Castro—Comments of Prime Minister—Human Rights in Cuba

“...r Canadians. There was a time when I was a kid where we were actually doing drills in the event of nuclear war at the time of the Cuban Missile Crisis. We are in a different period of time 50 years ...”

Hon. Elizabeth (Beth) Marshall

November 24th
Hansard Link

Health Medical Isotopes

“... on a couple of occasions in the past regarding the production of the isotopes at the Chalk River nuclear facility.

Many of us will recall that back in 2009 the reactor at Chalk River was shut down for I think it was in excess of a year, and there was a global shortage of medical isotopes, and of course Canadians were very concerned.

Medical isotopes are used in the diagnosis of many health conditions. There are 30,000 nuclear medical diagnostic scans each week in Canada, so the shortage in 2009 alarmed many Canadian...”

Senator Harder

November 22nd
Hansard Link

Foreign Affairs Diplomatic Relations with Iran

“...sts in our engagement with Iran, and are working with our allies who have been so engaged with the nuclear issue in Iran that Canada can participate with our allies in appropriate consultations and ...”

Hon. Thanh Hai Ngo

November 3rd
Hansard Link

National Defence Modernization of Arctic Defence Systems

“...dous progress in terms of technological advances. For instance, it has plans to build the tallest nuclear icebreaker in the world. Considering the increased Russian military activity in the North, ...”

Hon. John McCallum, P.C., M.P., Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship

October 4th
Hansard Link

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Caregiver Program

“...quite everything, but many things. So we kind of have to set priorities. My first priority is the nuclear family, the immediate family, the mother, the father, the husband, the wife, the dependent children, and that is the one we are really focused on getting down as quickly as we possibly can.

But I have seen projections for the times that it will take for caregivers, and those projections are coming down. They are not coming down fast enough, but they are coming down. We have limited resources at our disposal, and we have to make choices. I am working on the caregiver front, but my highest priority, in the first year in government, is to obtain as much relief as possible, as quickly as possible, for immediate nuclear families.”


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