Families: The Last Six Months
Of Federal Activity

About

This Report

This is a computer-generated report that shows all of the federal activity with respect to the keyword "Families" over the last six months. This is a demonstration of the power of our government relations automation software.

Hansard

House: 769 Speeches
Senate: 113 Speeches

House Senate

Bills

Active: 0

Regulations

Filed: 0
Proposed: 0

The House

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith (Beaches—East York, Lib.)

December 13th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...eds of our neighbours to volunteer packing and delivering hampers of toys, food, and necessities to families in need across our riding. I encourage everyone across our community to chip in if they can.

On December 20, people can join us at Secord Elementary to support a holiday hamper program run by the Neighbourhood Centre/Access Alliance. Between December 18 and 22, we can be joined at Community Centre 55's share a Christmas program. Together, we will pack and deliver packages of food and gifts to over 1,000 local families in need. That is the holiday spirit.”

Mr. Yves Robillard (Marc-Aurèle-Fortin, Lib.)

December 13th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“... This has been a pivotal year for the people of Laval, thanks to federal investments to support our families as well as other investments in jobs and public transit.

In closing, I wish everyone ...”

Mr. Jean Rioux (Saint-Jean, Lib.)

December 13th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“... difficult one for some.

As citizens, we should join the ranks of volunteers who provide many families with well-deserved comfort. This time of year awakens in us a sense of selflessness and com...”

Ms. Mary Ng (Markham—Thornhill, Lib.)

December 13th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...hat unites us at this time of the year is family. Many of us spend far too much time apart from our families, and I hope that members and staff take time over the holidays to be with their loved ones.

As we all come together with those who are dear to us, our friends, and those in our communities, we should recognize and appreciate the critical role that families play in allowing us to do our work.

In the spirit of family, I would like to take a moment to recognize Mr. Jeff Connor, whose son Alec is on my team. They are sharing a special father-son moment here on Parliament Hill. To both of them and to all the families in Markham—Thornhill and across Canada, happy Hanukkah, merry Christmas, and a happy new ye...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

December 13th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...This simplification will not only help many people continue to do what they are doing to help their families, but it will also ensure that the wealthiest Canadians do not benefit even more.”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

December 13th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... do not take into account the Canada child benefit. This benefit gives more money to nine out of 10 families. It has lifted hundreds of thousands of children out of poverty and is helping Canadian families immensely. It is one of the elements that led to the economic growth we are seeing now.

The Conservatives would have preferred to keep their own benefit, which gave money to millionaires every month. We are giving money to families who actually need it.”

Hon. Andrew Scheer (Leader of the Opposition, CPC)

December 13th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... start button. They have had two years to fix it. Two years, and they have done nothing. Meanwhile, families across the country are suffering because of the government's lack of action and incompetenc...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

December 13th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...

We are ensuring that we live up to the sacred obligation we owe to our veterans and to their families. This is work we take very seriously and it is work we are delivering on.”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

December 13th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...stop us. We brought in a Canada child benefit that would give more money to nine out of 10 Canadian families and lifts hundreds of thousands of kids out of poverty, and they tried to stop us. We moved...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

December 13th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... They campaigned against our Canada child benefit, which gave more money to nine out of 10 Canadian families and lifted hundreds of thousands of kids out of poverty. They wanted to continue with their benefits that sent child benefit cheques to millionaire families. I do not think that is fair. Canadians did not think that was fair. That is why we are del...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

December 13th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...year record.

We are creating the strongest economic growth in the G7. We are helping Canadian families succeed after 10 years of a Conservative government that did not give families the help they need.”

Mr. Alain Rayes (Richmond—Arthabaska, CPC)

December 13th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ion at the expense of our children and grandchildren, higher taxes for businesses, higher taxes for families, and no plan to balance the budget.

My wish for Canadians in 2018 is that the Prime M...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

December 13th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...The reality is that the Minister of Finance has met expectations, especially those of Canadian families, with respect to Canada's economy. The first thing he did was lower taxes for the middle class by raising them for the wealthy. Then he established the Canada child benefit, which helps nine out of ten families and will lift hundreds of thousands of children out of poverty.

He does that by not sending benefit cheques to the families of millionaires like the former government did. We are creating economic growth that is ben...”

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs (Lakeland, CPC)

December 13th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...e Canadians only when it is politically convenient for them.

Thalidomide survivors, veterans' families, and sick mothers, who have all gone to a minister for assistance, have been dismissed and ...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

December 13th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...>When he was veterans affairs minister, he made historic improvements to support veterans and their families and will continue to be a strong voice for the compassionate approach this government conti...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

December 13th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, we are still very concerned about the impact of job losses on workers and their families, and we acknowledge the excellent work done by Davie employees.

With regard to other ...”

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC)

December 13th
Hansard Link

Routine Proceedings

“...ampaign, I had the privilege and opportunity to walk alongside Canadians in support of thousands of families across our country who have suffered the loss of an infant.

Events in my home province of Alberta, like Quinn's Legacy Run in Airdrie, or the Baby Steps Walk to Remember in Calgary, Edmonton, and Sherwood Park, or Vaughn's Memorial Color Run in Cochrane, to events in Saskatoon like the No Foot Too Small Perinatal Loss Awareness Walk, to events like them all across the country, commemorate the lives of children who were taken too soon.

Therefore, I table this petition, which calls upon Parliament to walk alongside Canadian families, and to look for ways to better support parents dealing with pregnancy and infancy loss.

Mr. Randy Boissonnault (Edmonton Centre, Lib.)

December 13th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... repercussions of a criminal record, unable, in some cases, to find work, or even travel with their families. They were made to feel as though they had committed a major crime, and they were made to feel as though their sexual orientation could determine whether or not they had a chance in life.

Many tried to fight their convictions and lost. Some waited decades for redress, and others nearly half a century. Tragically, some did not live to see this day.

Today we are sending all of them and their loved ones a clear message when we move this legislation forward: their country is deeply sorry. Their country was wrong. Their country wants to make amends and help their healing process.[Translation]

I would like to take a moment today to thank all members, on both sides of the House, for their dedication to moving this bill forward. I would also like to thank all the activists and all those who have fought for more than 50 years and put themselves in danger to demand these changes over the past five decades.[English]

We have accounted for these issues by adding the provision that in cases where court or police records are not available, sworn statements may be accepted as evidence.

Second, I would like to speak to some of the questions we have heard concerning bawdy house laws. To be clear, bawdy house laws were intended to capture a broad scope of acts deemed immoral at the time. What this bill would do is deal with charges under gross indecency, buggery, and anal intercourse, which were used under the Criminal Code to victimize LGBTQ2 people systematically. We have enumerated those in the schedule to make sure we are being precise and clear.

Some have raised questions about whether we are simply passing the legislation and then leaving the rest to the LGBTQ2 community. That would be a mischaracterization. Once the bill passes, the government will undertake a proactive outreach process for potential applicants to increase awareness of the initiative as well as the criteria and the application process.

The government will work closely with federal partners and stakeholders from the LGBTQ2 community to inform those applicants. We will not leave members of the LGBTQ2 community in the dark. We have set aside $4 million over two years to implement the process, and I am confident that the process will be sound, efficient, and effective.

The Parole Board, once applications are made, will determine, case by case, successful applications, and successful applicants will have their records of convictions permanently destroyed. The RCMP can then destroy any records of convictions it has in its custody, and it can direct other federal departments or agencies to do the same. The expungement order will then be communicated to other courts and police forces as appropriate.

The bill would also allow the Parole Board of Canada to refuse to issue expungements in certain circumstances. More information on the application process will soon be available to potential applicants. It will not be long after the bill receives royal assent that the Parole Board could begin accepting applications.

The suffering the LGBTQ2 community has endured will not be forgotten. The government will contribute a minimum of $15 million for projects to record and memorialize the tragedy of the past and the hope for the future. That includes a national monument here in Ottawa and an education package concerning discrimination against LGBTQ2 Canadians.

I am proud to stand behind the government's efforts to improve life for our LGBTQ2 community. (1610) [Translation]

I invite my hon. colleagues to help eliminate discrimination and right the wrongs committed against the LGBTQ2 community by joining me in giving their full support to Bill C-66.[English]

Before I end, let me say, on behalf of the Prime Minister, the House leader, and all of my colleagues on this side of the House, a very merry Christmas and happy new year to you, Mr. Speaker, and your family, to all parliamentarians and staff for their hard work, to the Clerk and all table officers, to all branches and services of the House administration, to all the families connected to the Houses of Parliament, and to all the loved ones present here today and tho...”

Ms. Elizabeth May (Saanich—Gulf Islands, GP)

December 13th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ey are all friends—I want to say from the bottom of my heart that I hope they enjoy time with their families between now and our resumption in late January; that, if they celebrate Christmas they have...”

Mr. Marco Mendicino (Eglinton—Lawrence, Lib.)

December 11th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...ces, cardinals, academics, and musicians, even Luciano Pavarotti. Transcending these events are the families that come every day to see their nonnas—both of mine lived at Villa Colombo—or to drop off ...”

Ms. Ruth Ellen Brosseau (Berthier—Maskinongé, NDP)

December 11th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...nvironmental footprint. As the Christmas season begins, I encourage all my colleagues to take their families to visit the Christmas markets and local businesses in our regions.

In closing, I wou...”

Mr. Guy Caron (Rimouski-Neigette—Témiscouata—Les Basques, NDP)

December 11th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... their lives.

Will the Prime Minister ensure that pensions and support for veterans and their families are in place before they leave the army?”

Mr. Sean Casey (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Canadian Heritage, Lib.)

December 11th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...nalistic content is essential to a healthy democracy. Our thoughts are with the employees and their families who have been affected by these cuts. Canadians value local media, and we will continue to ...”

Mr. Sean Casey (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Canadian Heritage, Lib.)

December 11th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, our thoughts are with the workers and their families affected by the cuts in the print media industry. Canadians value local news, and our gover...”

Mrs. Carol Hughes (Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing, NDP)

December 11th
Hansard Link

Routine Proceedings

“...est rates of mental illnesses. They add that more than one million Canadians suffer, and that their families are negatively affected physically, emotionally, and financially by their struggles.

Given that the holiday season is upon us, this time of year is often more difficult for those who suffer from anorexia and bulimia and their families. They ask the government to work with provinces and territories and those affected, to deve...”

Mrs. Karen Vecchio

December 8th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... for this, or they cannot take their kids to Disney World. We have to recognize that there are many families that just want to travel across the border. It may be for work or it may be for recreation,...”

Mrs. Sylvie Boucher (Beauport—Côte-de-Beaupré—Île d'Orléans—Charlevoix, CPC)

December 8th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...n of people addicted to alcohol, drugs, gambling, and the Internet. It also provides support to the families of people affected. Its presence at the Charlevoix Casino as a resource in prevention is gr...”

Hon. Andrew Leslie (Orléans, Lib.)

December 8th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“Mr. Speaker, some 1.7 million Canadian families still do not have adequate housing, which is unacceptable. In a country as highly regarded and prosperous as Canada, everyone should have a roof over their head.[English]

Under the leadership of the Minister of Families, Children and Social Development and the member of Parliament for Spadina—Fort York, our go...”

Mr. Jean-Claude Poissant (La Prairie, Lib.)

December 8th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“Mr. Speaker, poverty is often hidden and closer than we think. Nearly 10% of Quebec families are living in poverty, and nearly four million Canadians are food insecure. Food drives on ...”

Mr. Neil Ellis (Bay of Quinte, Lib.)

December 8th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...programs.

To date, the Gleaner's Foodbank and Christmas sharing program has helped over 1,300 families enjoy nutritious and tasty food with a holiday basket; the Salivation Army's coats for folks program gave out more than 760 clothing items for winter; the Trenton VON Christmas for seniors program connected volunteers with seniors who needed assistance with holiday shopping or preparations; and toy drives by Belleville's Professional Fire Fighters Association and the Kinsmen Club of Quinte West helped over 700 families provide holiday gifts for their children.

I remind my hon. colleagues and all Canadia...”

Hon. Diane Finley (Haldimand—Norfolk, CPC)

December 8th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“.... Speaker, there are over 2,000 small businesses in my riding. Most of them are run by people with families and many of them live hand-to-mouth, depending on the vagaries of the federal tax system.

Hon. Jean-Yves Duclos (Minister of Families, Children and Social Development, Lib.)

December 8th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...rance program is, not only to make it easier for people to find a new job, but also to take care of families who are going through difficult times.

We have been working very hard over the past t...”

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Minister of Health, Lib.)

December 8th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, our government recognizes the impact of Lyme disease on families and on Canadians.

We have tabled the federal framework on Lyme disease in Canada, whi...”

Ms. Kamal Khera (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Revenue, Lib.)

December 8th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...rse, I have personally seen the impact that diabetes can have on the lives of individuals and their families. I am happy to say that a member of Diabetes Canada is part of the disability advisory comm...”

Ms. Kamal Khera (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Revenue, Lib.)

December 8th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ed nurse, I personally know the difficulties that face Canadians living with disabilities and their families. I want to assure all Canadians who benefit from the DTC that the eligibility criteria for ...”

Mr. Todd Doherty (Cariboo—Prince George, CPC)

December 8th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... is now being held ransom by an increasing protectionist U.S. administration. Hard-working forestry families and their livelihoods are being held ransom. With only weeks to go before Christmas, what is the minister planning to do and prepared to do for Canadian families?”

Ms. Hélène Laverdière (Laurier—Sainte-Marie, NDP)

December 8th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...s priorities and provide an adequate subsidy to help maintain an essential service for children and families?”

Hon. Jean-Yves Duclos (Minister of Families, Children and Social Development, Lib.)

December 8th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...h the municipalities, provinces, and territories to ensure that our communities, and especially our families and children, can benefit from the Canadian government's support not only now, but in the l...”

Mr. Arif Virani (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Canadian Heritage (Multiculturalism), Lib.)

December 8th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ry adoption is often a long and complex process, and we understand the challenges that are faced by families. The minister is aware of this case. His office has been in touch with the family in order ...”

Ms. Monique Pauzé (Repentigny, BQ)

December 8th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ie shipyard. Merry Christmas Quebec. What a nice gift from the federal government.

Almost 400 families are now unemployed because the government refuses to give better contracts to the best ship...”

Hon. Carolyn Bennett (Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs, Lib.)

December 8th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ember.

It is completely unacceptable that many northerners are still struggling to feed their families. As members know, our government already expanded nutrition north to support 37 additional communities. However, we know that much more needs to be done. We are considering all of the feedback received during the recent engagement and are collaborating with northern indigenous organizations to overhaul the program to be more reflective of northerners' needs and to work together on accessibility to country food. Together, we can ensure that northern families have access to affordable, healthy food.”

Mr. Majid Jowhari (Richmond Hill, Lib.)

December 8th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...For individuals suffering from mental illness, theirs is often a daily struggle to integrate into families, peer groups, and society as a whole. These same families and peer groups bear an untold burden, both emotional and economical, that must be addressed.

It is estimated that the total cost of mental health problems to the Canadian economy exceeds $50 billion annually in health care expenses and lost productivity. This represents nearly $1,400 for every Canadian. Over the next 30 years, this cost will add up to more $2.5 trillion for Canadians. We all must therefore recognize mental illness as an issue that affects not only the present circumstances of Canadian families but their future as well.

I am happy to be able to say that our government announced ...”

Mr. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, CPC)

December 8th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...ill because I do not believe it would achieve this balance between compassion for victims and their families, and for the offenders who suffer from mental illness.

Currently, section 721 of the Criminal Code enables a probation officer to publish a pre-sentence report after the offender is found guilty. The purpose of the report is to assist the court in imposing a sentence or in determining whether an accused should be discharged. A pre-sentence report must contain the following information: the offender's age, maturity, character, and willingness to make amends. It also contains the history of previous dispositions under the Young Offenders Act and the history of alternative measures used to deal with the offender and the offender's response to those measures.

Bill C-375 proposes to add another requirement to this list: the consideration of any mental health disorder from which the offender suffers, as well as any mental health care programs available to him or her. In practice, this would create some unfairness and inconsistencies in the application of laws and justice. Not all mental health disorders are the same. In fact, even the same mental health disorders can have a great deal of variance in how they impact individuals. It is paramount that compassion for those suffering with mental health disorders be balanced with the need to protect public safety and provide justice for victims and their families.

These changes are also a concern because they could add considerable delays to our court system, which is already overburdened. Increased delays and complexity would not help those in the justice system who have mental health disorders, nor would they be good for victims and their families. I do not think any of my colleagues in this House would want trials to be unnecessarily delayed, or after the fact, and I believe this legislation could add delays to our system.

Our understanding of mental health continues to evolve with more research. It is an incredibly complex issue, as I mentioned. There is a danger when anyone attempts to address mental health too broadly. The requirement of the bill to add pre-sentencing reports for mental disorders is too broad. As I said, not all mental health disorders are the same, and not all of them are equally relevant to our justice system. Currently, judges are able to take into account relevant information to ensure that the mentally ill are not treated poorly, and can do so without this legislation and in a way that is not cumbersome to the system. In the case of Vince Li in Manitoba, I believe that the justice system dealt quite ably with it by showing compassion both to the offender and to the victims and their families. It shows that the system is largely working well, and I believe this legislation could further tip the balance too far in the favour of the accused and against the victims and their families.

Another danger with this proposed change would be that its broad definition could be...”

Hon. Steven Blaney (Bellechasse—Les Etchemins—Lévis, CPC)

December 7th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... solve the problem. It is not complicated.

That is what they usually do. We have seen it with families. That is another illusion. It is not funny how they boast about loving the middle class. They want to help families and are going to give them extra cash. They are just trying to pull the wool over our eyes when they say that they are cutting taxes for the middle class. We are drinking the Kool-Aid and believing that it is true, and that it is good to give the middle class big subsidies. (1030)

Fortunately, we live in a democracy, and we have independent organizations. The Fraser Institute is not falling for the government's line. It says eight out of 10 families are paying more tax under this government, which eliminated tax credits for education, ball...”

Mr. Matt DeCourcey (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs, Lib.)

December 7th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... people. What better way to grow the economy than through immigration, bringing newcomers and their families into our region; investing in strategic infrastructure that respects our traditional ways o...”

Hon. Peter Kent (Thornhill, CPC)

December 7th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...y Parliamentary Caucus for Human Rights was moved to convene in this building today, a gathering of families of political prisoners. Their names are Raif Badawi, imprisoned in Saudi Arabia, with famil...”

Mr. Ken Hardie (Fleetwood—Port Kells, Lib.)

December 7th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...brate the many organizations in Surrey that give to the community all year long. For individuals or families in distress, with long-term challenges or short-term difficulties, these organizations, pow...”

Mr. Todd Doherty (Cariboo—Prince George, CPC)

December 7th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...offs are going to be seen.

What does this minister have to say to those hard-working forestry families who are now facing even a more uncertain future two weeks from the Christmas break?”

Mr. Robert Oliphant (Don Valley West, Lib.)

December 7th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...in 2016. She is still waiting.

Too many live-in caregivers are waiting far too long for their families, while they care for ours. Could the Minister of Immigration tell the House what he is doing to reunite caregivers with their families?”

Hon. Ahmed Hussen (Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship, Lib.)

December 7th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...de to Canadians. However, for far too long these people have been waiting to reunite with their own families. Under the mismanagement of the immigration system by the Conservatives, caregivers have be...”

Mrs. Brenda Shanahan (Châteauguay—Lacolle, Lib.)

December 6th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... subjected to abuse on a daily basis. Gender-based violence has devastating effects on individuals, families, and communities.[English]

These effects can be long lasting and profoundly affect ma...”

Hon. Diane Lebouthillier (Minister of National Revenue, Lib.)

December 6th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...or mental disability can have a significant impact on the daily lives of the people affected, their families, and their environment.

That is why, last year, the government invested more than $41...”

Hon. Carla Qualtrough (Minister of Public Services and Procurement, Lib.)

December 6th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, clearly we are always concerned about the impact of job losses on workers and their families. We recognize the expertise of Davie workers and the excellent work done on the Asterix. In...”

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Minister of Health, Lib.)

December 6th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ognize that autism spectrum disorder has a significant and lifelong impact on individuals and their families. Federal investments in research, data improvement, surveillance, and training skills are supporting those with autism and their families.

There are extraordinary stakeholders across the country raising awareness and providing services to families. Our government will certainly continue to provide support for them and for their efforts.<...”

Hon. Maryam Monsef (Minister of Status of Women, Lib.)

December 6th
Hansard Link

Routine Proceedings

“...nder-based violence, and we honour those victims whose names and stories we may never know, and the families and communities devastated by these tragedies.

To those who are still vulnerable, such as members of the LGBTQ2 communities, indigenous women and girls, newcomers, and women with disabilities and exceptionalities, we will not tolerate discrimination and violence. To those Canadians who lost someone on December 6, to survivors and families of those impacted by gender-based violence, we know that these senseless murders have their...”

Mrs. Sylvie Boucher (Beauport—Côte-de-Beaupré—Île d'Orléans—Charlevoix, CPC)

December 6th
Hansard Link

Routine Proceedings

“...ence, violence against women has been allowed everywhere, in communities throughout the country, in families, in schools, and in workplaces. It has also quickly pervaded social media, and much faster ...”

Ms. Sheila Malcolmson (Nanaimo—Ladysmith, NDP)

December 6th
Hansard Link

Routine Proceedings

“...ing it can to help the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls inquiry succeed, and support families of survivors. Canada should legislate pay equity for work of equal value, fix employment in...”

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC)

December 6th
Hansard Link

Routine Proceedings

“...Mr. Speaker, the tragedy of infant loss touches our nation and the lives of thousands of Canadian families each year.

In these times of great sorrow, organizations such as Hazel's Heroes, the ...”

Hon. Carolyn Bennett (Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs, Lib.)

December 6th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...all summer, yet are marked absent during goose and moose season when they go on the land with their families. They recognize that the indigenous pedagogy of learning by doing is the way they learn bes...”

Mr. Pierre-Luc Dusseault (Sherbrooke, NDP)

December 5th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...e allocation today in the House, Conservatives are further reducing that accountability to Canadian families, Canadian citizens and Canadian taxpayers.” Why does he not have the same answer and the sa...”

Ms. Emmanuella Lambropoulos (Saint-Laurent, Lib.)

December 5th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“..., Saint-Laurent, that provide support and are making such a difference in the lives of thousands of families every year. These organizations complement one another, together providing a variety of services that are essential to families in need. Many thanks go out to the Centre ABC de Saint-Laurent, CARI St-Laurent, the Carref...”

Mr. Earl Dreeshen (Red Deer—Mountain View, CPC)

December 4th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...ood about the history.

As the member for Malpeque mentioned, it is really a story of Canadian families. My wife's family, the Moore family, could have stayed in Charlottetown in 1892. They lived in a very nice place, but instead decided to come west as surveyors, to look at our vast country and see the kinds of things that were there. Then another 10 years later, when they had an opportunity to come to Alberta, they brought the whole family. My wife's father was one year old when they came in 1903. They became Albertans. Our family was there before Alberta was part of this great Confederation. Therefore, we have this bond between Charlottetown and Alberta. When we think about the importance of our entire country, it is so important that we are able to look at the families and relationships that exist there.

We had a chance to take my wife's father back to Charlottetown. This was probably in the mid-80s. He had not been there, but we did have a chance to look at the house. In the picture we had on the wall, a particular tree was about a two-inch diameter. When we were there, it took four of us to girth the thing. We can see a lot of things have happened there, but a lot of things have happened in the country as well. They are things we should be proud of, and we should recognize the strength there was in the people who decided this was something important to them.

My own family had gone to the U.S. They had come from Germany and gone to the U.S. in 1870. That was right after the American Civil War. The stress and situations that occurred there had them come to Alberta, as well, in 1903. There has been this great bond and this mixing we have in society, and it is because of families. When they came to Alberta, they started off first selling draught horses, because that was...”

Mr. James Bezan (Selkirk—Interlake—Eastman, CPC)

December 4th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...ion Impact in the fight against ISIS. It was only after veterans, members of the military and their families cried out, and after our work as the official opposition to hold the government to account on taking away the danger pay and tax benefits awarded to those who put their lives on the line in operational missions in the fight against terrorism that the Minister of National Defence and Treasury Board president backed down. Danger pay is $1,800 a month for all those who were deployed, and they deserve every penny. Canadians asked them to take on these roles, and they deserve every penny. (1225)

However, did the Liberals learn from this? Not at all. On September 1, they retroactively applied to September 1 a provision stating that special allowances would be cut of those members who are ill, injured, and cannot return to work within six months. This includes those enlisted in our special operations forces, fighter jet pilots, commandos of the JTF 2, or Joint Task Force 2, out there fighting ISIS, and our submariners. If they cannot get back to work within 180 days, they will lose their special allowances for the particular skills they have developed as members of the Canadian Armed Forces. That is almost $23,000 per year. It is ridiculous.

We framed it this way in the House. We can have two Canadians leave Canada and go to Iraq, one as a member of the Canadian Armed Forces to fight ISIS, and the other as a terrorist member of ISIS. If that soldier is injured out in the field, comes back and cannot get back to work within six months, he loses his special allowances of $23,000 a year. However, an ISIS terrorist coming back to Canada is welcomed with open arms by the Liberal government and put into reintegration programs. Again, that is a perversion of public policy. It is completely disgusting.

The Liberals really do not like to hear the truth. The public safety ministry is saying that returning foreign terrorist travellers and their families, specifically women and children, require proper disengagement and reintegration support. Again, I can see our doing that for someone who might have been exposed to it in our communities in Canada, but not once they have been abroad. We are seeing different members being interviewed, especially ISIS brides coming back with their families, who believe in the ideology of raising their children to commit jihad down the road. These...”

Mr. Mark Holland (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, Lib.)

December 4th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“... things they wanted when the came to this place, was to make their communities safer, to make their families safer, to make their friends and neighbours safer. It is a prime motivator, I believe, for ...”

Mr. Mark Holland

December 4th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...it later turned out had done no wrong, and who wound up in foreign jails for years, away from their families, being tortured and taking incredible amounts of psychological abuse.

That is why thi...”

Mr. Matthew Dubé (Beloeil—Chambly, NDP)

December 4th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...e evidence. In fact, sometimes these people are victims. Some of them are taken over there by their families. They are vulnerable people who quickly realize after arriving that they have made a mistake, and who then come back to Canada without committing any acts of violence.

Will some of these individuals be criminally prosecuted? Of course, but evidence is needed. Rather than heckling and shouting “yes”, we must understand the nuances of the situation. We have to understand that our system is a system of law. I am not talking about rights and freedoms. I am talking about a system of law, the rule of law. It is important to understand that simply making a list of people and sending them all to prison is not an effective approach to public safety. We have to have evidence, and we have to understand the challenges associated with that evidence, challenges that experts have told us about.

The Conservative member is heckling me by shouting “yes, we have to do it”. If we move forward with these criminal charges, we need to make sure that they will result in prison sentences. Rather than blaming the government and engaging in a senseless dialogue by claiming that some people in the House are seeking to jeopardize the safety of Canadians, we need to understand that there is work to do to ensure that the national security agencies and police forces that have the evidence they need to successfully prosecute will do so. Everyone would be pleased if that happened, because it would help keep Canadians safe.

Let us engage in a positive dialogue. That is the approach that we are advocating today. It is no secret that I disagree with the approach of the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, but one thing is certain and leaves no room for debate: we want keep to Canadians safe and ensure public safety. (1320) [English]

In that context, when we are looking at such an important issue as this one, to engage in dog-whistle politics and use expressions like “welcomed with open arms” and to throw things out about reading poetry, to denigrate counter-radicalization efforts, does a disservice to the men and women doing the serious work of making sure Canadians are safe, does a disservice to this House where we all believe in the importance of ensuring Canadians' safety, and does a disservice to the real efforts and debate that need to happen over the proper way of dealing with the situation.[Translation]

As part of the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security's review of Canada's national security framework, we travelled for one week, stopping in five cities in five days. We stopped in Montreal, where we had the opportunity to visit the Centre for the Prevention of Radicalization Leading to Violence. This centre is one of a kind in North America. It is so unique that it receives calls from families in New York who are worried about the possible radicalization of a friend, a family member, or even a child in some cases.

We sat down with the team at the centre and had a nuanced discussion. It was clear that these people fully understood that in many cases, the RCMP and our national security agencies have a role to play and a job to do if they are to catch those who pose a threat to public safety and security.

The collaboration between our police forces and national security agencies has been outstanding. They have also made an effort to reach out to the community and to concerned families and individuals. This work did not focus on any community more than another. An attack like...”

Mr. Louis Plamondon (Bécancour—Nicolet—Saurel, BQ)

December 4th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“Mr. Speaker, the holidays are approaching, but for 800 families in the Quebec City region, the holidays bring anguish and uncertainty.

I am talking about the families of the Davie shipyard workers who are going to lose their jobs for lack of federal contract...”

Mr. Marwan Tabbara (Kitchener South—Hespeler, Lib.)

December 4th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...oin me in thanking all the workers in manufacturing facilities across this country to support their families and themselves, and to provide Canadians with all the manufactured products we take for gra...”

Mr. Harold Albrecht (Kitchener—Conestoga, CPC)

December 4th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...is truly important in life and to commit to spreading Christ's message of peace and goodwill in our families, in our communities, in Canada, and around the world.

This Christmas, I ask that peop...”

Hon. Diane Lebouthillier (Minister of National Revenue, Lib.)

December 4th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ng the quality and accessibility of the services it provides to persons with disabilities and their families.”

Hon. Diane Lebouthillier (Minister of National Revenue, Lib.)

December 4th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ng the quality and accessibility of the services it provides to persons with disabilities and their families.”

Ms. Yvonne Jones

December 4th
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“...quiry. In fact, we have been there to support them on every part of this journey and to support the families that have been impacted. We want to ensure the success of this independent inquiry, and I c...”

Ms. Rachael Harder

December 4th
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“...m the beginning and they are still not listening today. They are making it incredibly difficult for families to work together to support a family-owned business. They are raising taxes on passive inco...”

Mr. Joël Lightbound (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance, Lib.)

December 1st
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...e strengthening the Canada child benefit, to ensure it continues to play a vital role in supporting families for years to come.

The Canada child benefit will be bolstered by annual cost of living increases starting in July 2018, which is two years ahead of schedule.

The government had previously committed to indexing the Canada child benefit to inflation as of July 2020. However, our economic growth and our improved fiscal record have allowed our government to achieve this commitment two years ahead of schedule, which is excellent news for Canadian families.

We are also putting money in the pockets of low-income Canadians by increasing the working income tax benefit by $500 million more per year as of 2019. This benefit will ultimately be 65% higher than it was when we came to power.

I remind members that the working income tax benefit is a refundable tax credit that supplements the earnings of low-income workers, the people who are working hard to get into the middle class, such as young, single workers who are struggling to carve out a place on the job market.[English]

The working income tax benefit provides important income support and helps to ensure that work is rewarded. This $500 million enhancement announced in the fall economic statement is in addition to the increase of about $250 million annually that will come into effect in that year as part of the enhancement of the Canada pension plan. These two actions will boost the total amount the government spends on the working income tax benefit by about 65% in 2019, increasing benefits to current recipients and expanding the number of Canadians receiving that much-needed support.

This will give a needed boost to well over 1.5 million low-income workers as they work long hours, sometimes in more than one job, to advance their careers and support themselves and their families. Whether this extra money is used for things such as helping to cover the family grocery bi...”

Mr. Bob Saroya (Markham—Unionville, CPC)

December 1st
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“Mr. Speaker, I want to wish Markham—Unionville residents and their families a very merry Christmas. Tonight I will be attending the 37th Unionville Olde Tyme Christmas...”

Mr. Larry Maguire (Brandon—Souris, CPC)

December 1st
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...ng illnesses. Every day they gather their courage to get out of bed, go to work, take care of their families, and do the best they can in very challenging circumstances. We know that for some unknown ...”

Hon. Pierre Poilievre (Carleton, CPC)

December 1st
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...hat people suffering with autism are losing the disability tax credit, a tax increase of $1,500 for families that are suffering with great hardship. Whenever Liberals raise taxes, why do they always t...”

Hon. Diane Lebouthillier (Minister of National Revenue, Lib.)

December 1st
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ng the quality and accessibility of the services it provides to persons with disabilities and their families.”

Mr. Joël Lightbound

December 1st
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, I would also think that the some 20,000 children in my riding whose families receive more money through the Canada child benefit, which has lifted 300,000 kids out of p...”

Hon. Mike Lake (Edmonton—Wetaskiwin, CPC)

December 1st
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... exactly like the serious one raised by Autism Canada in regard to the disability tax credit.

Families are using words like “frustrating”, “maddening”, and “heartbreaking” to describe the situat...”

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Minister of Health, Lib.)

December 1st
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, we recognize that autism spectrum disorder has a significant impact on families and individuals. Federal investments in research, data improvement, surveillance, and training skills are supporting those with autism and their families. There is an extraordinary network of stakeholders across the country raising awareness and providing services to families. Our government will continue to support these efforts through our programs.”

Mr. Gordon Brown (Leeds—Grenville—Thousand Islands and Rideau Lakes, CPC)

December 1st
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, families with children who have autism need the disability tax credit to help offset the costs of expensive therapy. The Liberals are nickel and diming these families to pay for their out-of-control spending. It is a disgusting attack on vulnerable Canadians. Do these families not have enough to deal with without having to fight the Liberals to get the credits that t...”

Hon. Diane Lebouthillier (Minister of National Revenue, Lib.)

December 1st
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ognize that autism spectrum disorder has a significant and lifelong impact on individuals and their families. Federal investments in research, improved data, surveillance, and training will help support people with autism and their families.

There is an extraordinary network of stakeholders across the country, raising awareness and providing services to families. Our government will continue to support their efforts through our programs.”

Mr. Matthew Dubé (Beloeil—Chambly, NDP)

December 1st
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...re not always very effective.

However, gone is the public transit tax credit, which benefited families, students, and those middle-class Canadians that the government says it wants to stand up for and design its policies around. The fact that the CEO loophole stays intact while the public transit tax credit gets axed shows that there is a gap between what the government says it wants to do and what actually happens in real life.

One of the most problematic aspects of this bill is the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank. This is related to another major file we looked at with the first budget implementation bill, namely the Canada infrastructure bank. We have heard very little about it since then.

There have been many debates on this subject in the House of Commons. Our biggest concern is that it is really a bank designed to privatize public infrastructure. It invests public money and then asks the private sector to invest. However, these investments come with conditions, and those conditions are extremely dangerous.

The public will be paying for infrastructure that the private sector will be asked to invest in. The public will then have to pay again, through tolls, for example, and will have to bear the entire financial burden of maintaining this infrastructure.

This is very worrisome. The Liberals support this approach. We know that these contracts will not benefit small or even medium-sized communities, which need infrastructure badly, as do municipalities. Instead, they will of course benefit the Liberals' Bay Street friends and representatives of investment companies like BlackRock, who attend closed-door meetings with the government about the development of this infrastructure bank.

We now see that approach continuing with this bill, which allows the Minister of Finance to invest $480 million of Canadian taxpayers' money in the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank.

This is very troubling because there are risks to the sovereignty of our infrastructure. It also lets them claim that the more than $200 million allocated by the government has doubled. That amount will now be $480 million. This is a very troubling situation.

We can also see what is missing from all of this. I would like to take this opportunity to talk about local issues, issues back home, issues that affect the riding of Beloeil—Chambly.

In the last election campaign, one of the most important issues was whether we were going to get a commitment from the government. In fact, I made a commitment that if the NDP were to form government, we would change the law to resolve disputes between the federal government and many municipalities. Let me explain. This has to do with certain sites that are federal government property, such as Fort Chambly and the Chambly Canal in my riding.

The Supreme Court ruled on this a few years ago in Halifax (Regional Municipality) v. Canada (Public Works and Government Services). In that case, the City of Halifax and other municipalities involved in the matter argued that the federal government was not paying its fair share in lieu of taxes. Indeed, the federal government does not pay municipal taxes on land that it owns.

In its ruling, the Supreme Court agreed that the government was not paying its fair share. At the time, the federal government offered to create an advisory panel to help the decision-making process, in order to obtain an accurate assessment of the value of the sites and to ensure that the payments meet the municipalities' expectations.

The problem is that the advisory panel was made up of bureaucrats, and what it said was basically that if a municipality like Chambly did not agree with the federal government's decision with respect to the assessment of a site it owns, such as the fort and the canal, the government would just lob the ball to other bureaucrats, who would essentially make the same decision.

The bill I introduced in the last Parliament, which I reintroduced at the beginning of this one, would set up an independent assessment process to get it out of the hands of the governments involved in these disputes. We need independent assessment. As we saw in Chambly, the city commissioned an independent assessment to determine the fair value of the property.

This is something that really worries me. Why? During the last election campaign and during the debate that took place in Chambly, we got all of the other candidates to sign on to that commitment. That was at my insistence. If any other candidate, including the Liberal candidate, had won, he or she would have done the same thing.

Right now, we have a Liberal government that has not taken any action on this despite our repeated requests or the bill I introduced. We are talking about $500,000 a year for Chambly. For a city with a population of about 30,000, $500,000 is a big deal.

Not only is this a way for the federal government to pay its fair share, but it is also a way to make more resources available for cities so that they can offer services for residents, such as public transit, which is a free service in Chambly.

I am raising this issue because I think that introducing a budget implementation bill like this one that changes all sorts of provisions constitutes an opportunity to change the law so that Public Works and Government Services Canada is required to conduct an independent assessment when there is a conflict between a municipality and a city like Chambly.

Speaking of Chambly, there is another aspect of this bill that I find very worrisome and it has to do with infrastructure. The government and the minister responsible made announcements in Montreal and the greater Montreal area about the REM light rail project, which is extremely important for the city's suburbs, particularly the second tier of suburbs, which includes my riding.

However, there is a caveat. We realize that certain aspects of the file need to be discussed in order to ensure that the project is completed while fully respecting the people and the municipalities. A very important request was made by the mayors of Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu and Chambly, and here I appeal to my colleague, the Liberal member for Saint-Jean. They would like the rail network to be extended so it can properly serve the residents of the Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu region and the Chambly basin.

In its current form, the project will create horrific traffic jams on highways 30 and 10. It is also important to consider urban spread and population growth in areas like mine. Naturally, we are happy that people want to move to our area and start a family. That is important, because the trend is towards population aging, and we are seeing more and more young families in our neighbourhoods.

In 2011, Marieville, one of the municipalities in my riding, was one of the top three municipalities in Quebec for population growth. In 2012, two municipalities in my riding, one of which is no longer part of my riding, ranked among the five Quebec municipalities with the highest birth rates. Furthermore, in the last Parliament, my riding was the third most populous federal riding in Quebec, thanks to its relatively young population, which ran counter to the trend.

At a meeting with members of the Fédération étudiante collégiale du Québec, or FECQ, I learned that the only CEGEPs in Quebec that will not see a drop in student numbers are those that serve the greater Montérégie area and Montreal, particularly the Saint-Hyacinthe and Édouard-Montpetit CEGEPs.

Given that more and more people are living and working in my riding, but sometimes also work in Montreal, it is extremely important to have a good public transit system. When it comes to the REM, one of the biggest projects ever proposed, the government must show some respect for communities and municipalities like Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu and Chambly. These municipalities are making a very specific request. Not only do they want their residents to be well served, but they also want to ensure that traffic will not increase on the roads used by the people I represent. That is extremely important.

I can say today in the House that we are going to continue to call upon the ministers responsible to ensure that they are listening. I am talking about this during the debate on the budget implementation bill because, although the government says that it is providing funding, funding is not enough. Respect and project implementation are also important. Of course, that will require full and effective co-operation with the Government of Quebec and municipalities like Chambly and Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu.

There is good news, too, but not thanks to the government. I am very pleased to say that the good news stems from the hard work of our team, my counterparts in the National Assembly, and municipal elected officials. I am talking about the Beloeil pool. Enough people signed the registry to hold a referendum about building a pool, and the outcome was positive.

The subject also came up during two election campaigns in Beloeil, including the one that just ended. It even came up during the federal and Quebec elections in 2015, because people wanted to be sure the money would be available for this infrastructure project, which is very important to the community and to the young families I mentioned earlier.

I sat down with the mayor of Beloeil, Diane Lavoie, and my Natio...”

Hon. John McKay (Scarborough—Guildwood, Lib.)

December 1st
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...a child benefit is possibly the most revolutionary and effective way to get money into the hands of families who will actually use it? That is my first question, from a theoretical and policy standpoi...”

Mr. Matthew Dubé

December 1st
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...revolutionary”, because, as a Quebecker, when I think of measures that could be implemented to help families and expand the job market, especially for women, I think of the implementation of Quebec's child care program.

I would be very pleased to see a similar system become established across the country. It would be a good start because until child care services become affordable and even if we make all the investments possible, it comes down to one way that families can have this growing need met.

With respect to families in my riding that may or may not have received these government benefits, I would like to s...”

Mr. Matthew Dubé

December 1st
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... tax credit. This is not just about students and commuters going to work. It could also include the families of students who still live at home.

When I finished high school, I took public transi...”

Hon. John McKay (Scarborough—Guildwood, Lib.)

December 1st
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ey has come into their ridings as well.

The point is that this money goes into the pockets of families with children. It is a cheque that arrives in their bank account. It is money that goes dir...”

Mr. John Brassard (Barrie—Innisfil, CPC)

December 1st
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...rise with an understanding that the sacrifices that have been made by those men and women and their families throughout the course of Canadian history is what allows all of us who sit in our symbol of democracy the privilege to do so. I want to thank them, their families, and their memories. I hope by the time I am done here today, I will have done a good enough job explaining what the private member's bill is all about and ask for the support of the House for it.

I am looking to establish three basic principles within the Department of Veterans Affairs Act: that the person, as well as his or her dependants or survivors, is to be treated with dignity, respect, and fairness; that the uniqueness of a person's professionalism, obligations, and sacrifices such a profession demands also impacts the experiences of the individual's family; and that any decision regarding the care, treatment, and re-establishment in civilian life of the person and the benefits to be provided be made in a timely manner.

It is in the spirit of Sir Robert Borden, who spoke to Canadian soldiers preparing for that great battle of Vimy Ridge, that Bill C-378 is introduced. Our eighth prime minister said to the troops at the time:

...you need have no fear that the government and the country will fail to show just appreciation of your service...The government and the country will consider it their first duty to prove to the returned men its just and due appreciation of the inestimable value of the services rendered to the country...

Sir Robert Borden may have been the first to talk about an obligation and duty, but he has not been the last. Veterans and current members of the Canadian Armed Forces who I met with this summer told me they wished to see these principles in place.

Over the summer, I had the opportunity to travel across the country to meet with veterans, their families, and stakeholders. Every single one of them talked about this sacred obligation, this covenant, on behalf of the government and its service men and women. When Sir Robert Borden spoke of that obligation to Canadian soldiers, there has never been an obligation to the men and women and their families enacted in Canadian legislation, and that is what I hope to change with Bill C-378.

This is not an indictment on any government. It is not an indictment on the current government and it is not an indictment on the valuable employees who work at Veterans Affairs Canada. This is about doing something for which veterans have asked.

The previous government brought in a Veterans Bill of Rights in 2007. Under the Veterans Bill of Rights, veterans have the right to take part in discussions that involve them and their families, have someone with them to support them when they deal with Veterans Affairs, to receive clear, easy-to-understand information about programs and services in English and French, as set out in the Official Languages Act, and have their privacy protected, as set out in the Privacy Act. (1325)

More importantly, the Veterans Bill of Rights has two rights that are included as principles in Bill C-378. The first principle is that the person be treated with respect, dignity, fairness, and courtesy, the benefits and services as set in our published service standards, and knowing one's appeal rights.

Canada had the Veterans Bill of Rights, but it is the 2011 armed services covenant from the United Kingdom, Prime Minister David Cameron, that was the gold standard, and continues to be the gold standard, for stating a nation's obligation to its forces.

Highlights in the U.K. armed forces covenant include that they, the men and women and their families, “deserve our respect and support, and fair treatment.” It says in that covenant, “the whole nation has a moral obligation to the members of the Naval Service, the Army, and the Royal Air Force, together with their families.” They “should face no disadvantage compared to other citizens in the provision of public and commercial services. Special consideration is appropriate in some cases, especially for those who have given most such as the injured and the bereaved.”

It is also important to understand that the United Kingdom is the only country in the world that has a covenant with its service men and women.

I am proud of Bill C-378 and the principles that our armed forces members and veterans are asking for. I would like to take some time to go through the three principles. The first principle states, “that the person, as well as their dependants or survivors, is to be treated with dignity, respect and fairness;" This respect is duly earned, as the men and women who defend our democracy essentially go to work in a theatre of war where those they are battling do not recognize the rights and freedoms that Canadians expect to have.

Canadians would not have those rights and freedoms without the efforts of our brave soldiers and the sacrifices they have faced on battlefields for the past 150 years. In the words of Aaron Bedard, a veteran and someone I now consider a friend, about fairness, respect, and dignity, “I know that the principles of fairness, respect and dignity towards Canadian veterans are as important to [Canadians] as they are for veterans and our families.” I believe that in all that I am. It was Sir Robert Borden who first touched on the idea of obligation because of the duty performed by our Canadian Forces.

The second principle of Bill C-378 states that we should recognize “the uniqueness of the person's professionalism”, and “the obligations and sacrifices”, such as that a profession “demands also impacts the experiences of their family”.

It was only in recent years where the duty of a soldier's family has been recognized. This recognition is long overdue. For far too many years, families along with veterans suffered in silence with what was at first called “shell shock”, which we know now as the unseen injury of post-traumatic stress disorder.

On that note, the hon. member for Cariboo—Prince George has passed Bill C-211 in the House. It has been 168 days that legislation has been in the Senate, and it is time that the bill be passed in the Senate.

In many veterans affairs committee meetings, it was the spouse or a family member that spoke out about their roles in keeping their father, brother, mother, sister alive after returning from theatres of war. Bill C-378, if passed, will forever recognize the uniqueness and obligations of not only the veterans who fought, but the families of the soldiers and our veterans.

More important is the third principle, “that any decision regarding the care, treatment or re-establishment in civil life of the person and the benefits to be provided to them be made in a timely manner.”

Many discussions in the House and in committee revolve around the care that our veterans receive. In some cases, Veterans Affairs does well, and I commend the men and women who work in VAC offices across Canada, in call centres, and in the Charlottetown headquarters, for the work that they do.

However, there must be a recognition that there are cases where gaps are located and the standard of service cannot be met. (1330)

The idea of providing benefits in a timely manner must be considered in all aspects of the care received by our veterans when they are transitioning to civilian life. There is a standard of care, but there are way too many gaps right now causing delays. We can do better, and we must do better.

Dave Bona, a veteran and mefloquine survivor said it best when he stated:

When a soldier comes home all they ask for is to have the services and medical care they need available in a timely manner for themselves and their family. Having these reasonable principles in the act will set in place the simple obligation that we ask for.

The obligation is that care be provided when it is needed, not six, seven, 10, or 12 months after it is asked for. The obligation of getting care to veterans rests with Veterans Affairs Canada. Service provision in a timely manner does not mean using an average of 16 weeks to deliver services within, for example, but giving a realistic expectation to veterans and their families of the different care that will be delivered in varying circumstances. The principle of receiving care in timely manner takes the idea of “in a timely manner” from being aspirational to being realistic and expected. It also puts it in legislation. As research improves how care is delivered, so should the timing of when that care is delivered.

As I said, last summer I had an opportunity to travel the country with the members for Yorkton—Melville and Souris—Moose Mountain, and met with veterans and their families. I met with a Robert Gagnon, a veteran walking across B.C. to help veterans suffering from PTSD. In Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, we talked with the women and men who run the military family resource centres. I met with Medric Cousineau, who has saved 99 lives by pairing veterans with trained service dogs. In Calgary, we learned the incredible story of how the police are helping our homeless veterans. In Edmonton, we met with CAF members and veterans together, and in that meeting, a colonel helped one veteran get off the street after hearing his story at that round table.

I give all of the credit for the three principles in Bill C-378 to everyone we met this summer. It is the veterans and their families, the MFRC staff, and the volunteers and activists who helped get this bill to the House today.

I hope all members of the House will support this bill and get Bill C-378 to committee, where more voices of veterans and their families can be heard on these important principles and the need to get them put into legislation.

Mr. John Brassard

December 1st
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“Mr. Speaker, it was an incredible summer engaging with so many families and stakeholders right across the country. I heard stories, which were very similar, of the hardships they faced as they fought for Canada and of some of those hardships they faced coming back.

I do not look at this proposed legislation through a lens of political partisanship. It should be incumbent upon all of us, whether we are Conservative, Liberal, NDP, or any other recognized party in this country, that we should do our best for our veterans. I think that is what Canadians want. In fact, I know that is what Canadians want. They want us, as a matter of priority, to make sure that our veterans are looked after.

There are so many stories that I could tell, and there were a lot of tears as well over the summer. Meeting with those veterans and their families really put me on this path. With the proximity that I have in my riding to Base Borden, the...”

Mrs. Sherry Romanado (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Veterans Affairs and Associate Minister of National Defence, Lib.)

December 1st
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...n 2015, the Prime Minister clearly indicated that the time had come to fix that. Veterans and their families deserve our respect and gratitude, and the existing system needed a major overhaul to create a process that is easy to access, simple to navigate, and focused on the veteran. [English]

To accomplish this, he tasked the Minister of Veterans Affairs and Associate Minister of National Defence with an aggressive mandate, with 20 commitments that focused on three clear points.

First, the veteran must be at the centre of everything that Veterans Affairs Canada does. Second, we have to work harder to include the veteran's family in all planning, benefits, and services. Third, we have to do whatever we can to help every veteran reach their new normal.

A big step forward in achieving these goals is to regain the trust of Canada's veteran community, which is something the department has been making strides in by engaging with veterans and taking action. I have personally travelled to 12 wings and bases since March, and I have talked to our troops, veterans, and their families about how we can work together to get this right. As part of a military family, I believe it is important to listen to our veterans, our Canadian Armed Forces members, and their families, and I will always be willing to do so.

Veterans Affairs Canada has held stakeholder summits and working groups, has created six ministerial advisory groups, and has listened to concerns, ideas, and suggestions from veterans and veteran stakeholders from across the country. That feedback helped lead to our delivering on six mandate commitments in 2016, and to the initiatives that were introduced in budget 2017 that will deliver on eight more. (1345) [Translation]

In budget 2016, the government committed to investing $5.7 billion over six years to restore critical access to services, ensure the long-term financial security of veterans with disabilities, and honour the service, sacrifice, and achievements of those who served in our military.

Budget 2017 provides for a comprehensive set of measures to recognize the important role of caregivers, help more families, support mental health, and pay for the education and training veterans need to find a job.

That includes the implementation of eight measures totalling $624 million over six years.[English]

Our work continues as we enhance the financial security and wellness elements of the new veterans charter to help veterans and their families transition to post-military life and make choices about what they want to do next, whether it be work, education, or other activities.

There is no doubt that our government has worked hard to provide veterans and their families with the care and support they need, and to commemorate those who served, all in line with the principles laid out in the Veterans Bill of Rights. Applying to all former members of the military and family members, the bill of rights includes the principles of dignity, respect, and fairness, because this government knows it is due to their contributions and sacrifices that we are all here today.

As I can confirm, family should always be a part of the discussion, because when a man or woman serves, or when their sons are serving, as mine are, the entire family serves along with them.

While the new veterans charter, introduced in 2006, received all-party support, what emerged over the years was a patchwork system of policies and benefits, which made it more complicated for veterans to get the support they needed when they needed it. This was a consistent message from the veteran community, and something the department has gone to great lengths to address. For over a year, through a service delivery review, they reviewed and assessed how programs and services are delivered to veterans and their families.[Translation]

We now have a plan to provide services that are faster, more flexible, and more responsive by focusing more on veterans when they contact the department for the first time and by providing a personalized response that meets all of the veteran's needs.

Regardless of whether veterans call, visit an office in person, go online, or send a request by mail, Veterans Affairs Canada will ensure that they get the same information and have the same positive service experience.[English]

This type of change does not happen overnight, but we have an action plan in place. It is posted on our website. It outlines each recommendation and when it will be completed.

The department has already started making some of the important changes that will make a difference now. For example, it has simplified the approvals process for certain disability claims, like PTSD and hearing loss, and has reduced the burden on veterans. This has resulted in 27% more decisions being completed in the last fiscal year compared to the year before. It is a small step, but it is definitely a step in the right direction.

One of our biggest endeavours so far has been the guided support pilot project. Launched in a few cities, a group of veterans were identified to receive one-on-one assistance in applying for benefits and services to ensure that they are getting the most out of what the department has to offer. The pilot project received tremendous feedback and delivers on some of the recommendations for in-person service delivery. It also addresses the larger issue of veterans not always knowing the right questions to ask. The department does the hard work of navigating the system and provides the veterans with the specific information and advice they need. Veterans Affairs is currently looking at the next steps with the project in order to roll it out nationally.[Translation]

Another recommendation was to bring back the client survey in order to ensure that all veterans and their families had a chance to provide feedback. I am proud to announce, on behalf of the department, that the results of this national survey are in, and it is clear that we are making progress.

Some of the results attest to the department's efforts to improve the long-term financial security and independence of veterans who are sick or injured. To restore critical access to services, Veterans Affairs Canada reopened 10 offices across the country last year, in addition to substantially improving access to front-line staff and case managers. (1350) [English]

In this recent survey, 83% of veterans, RCMP members, and family members responded that they felt their case management plans met their needs. That is a significant increase from 2010, when only 24% were satisfied. Additionally, 81% responded that they were either satisfied or very satisfied with the support the department provides, and many felt that services exceeded their expectations. An overwhelming 94% found that VAC staff treats them with respect. That speaks volumes for the progress the department is making, indicating that it is headed in the right direction in respecting, supporting, and treating all veterans fairly.

The issue at the core of the bill comes down to how we treat veterans and their families in their dealings with Veterans Affairs Canada by calling on the department to treat them with fairness, respect, and dignity, and to recognize the unique experience of veterans and their families. I doubt there is a member in this place who disagrees with the importance of these sentiments.

The challenge presented by the bill is how we define these principles so they are interpreted consistently and not subjectively. These principles exist in the Veterans Bill of Rights, and if they can be strengthened, we should examine doing that. I would like to see the bill make it to committee where members can take a much closer look at these principles and how Veterans Affairs can and should apply them.

When it comes to our Canadian Armed Forces members, our veterans, and their families, we will always strive for excellence and to improve our services and benefits. Indeed, the very reason I decided to run for federal office was that I felt veterans and Canadian Armed Forces members and their families were not being treated as well as they could be. With two sons serving, I know that they, too, one day will be veterans, so I am committed to working hard for them and all military families.

I look forward to working with the member for Barrie—Innisfil to make sure that we do right by our brave men and women in uniform, those who have served, and the families who support them.”

Ms. Karine Trudel (Jonquière, NDP)

December 1st
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...eir benefits, services, and medical care are often still being processed, which puts them and their families in a precarious financial and emotional situation.

It can take several months before they start to receive their benefits and before they can access medical care. It is important that these women and men who fought to protect our freedom be treated with dignity. I think that their service has already caused them enough stress, so let us not make things worse for them. The government should do its duty; veterans have already done theirs.

Canadians will recall that the Conservatives are the ones who took veterans to court, refusing to admit that the government had a sacred obligation to ill and injured veterans. It is very disappointing to see that the Liberals have hired the same lawyers to make the same arguments in court.

Despite the rhetoric from a number of members on both sides of the House, both Conservative and government members, we must give our veterans all the support they need. After all, real action is worth more than words.

As a member of Parliament, I have the honour of meeting veterans and members of the Royal Canadian Legion in my riding at all of their events. With them, I travel back in time to be reminded of what transpired, whether we are talking about the great wars or about missions they may have carried out throughout their careers. This is also an opportunity to discuss their work experience and what they went through. The stories are sometimes sad, but they can also be happy.

It is also always a pleasure to participate in the Remembrance Day ceremony. I was very proud that this year, on November 11, we were able to attend a parade of members of the army, air force, navy, the Saguenay naval reserve, and the cadets. A number of veterans were there to commemorate Remembrance Day. This parade took place in Arvida, where my riding office is located. I am very proud to speak with them as their member of Parliament. (1355)

While I am at it, I want to talk about the work that members of the Arvida branch of the Royal Canadian Legion are doing. These men and women are very involved in their community. They take part in Remembrance Day ceremonies and other activities, and they make a difference in the lives of veterans and their families by helping and supporting them every day.

I want to emphasize the family part because family is important to people who are facing hardships or whose health no longer allows them to do day-to-day or work activities.

Veterans' main focus is on working with the Legion to promote Remembrance Day, but they also support serving men and women in uniform. I would like to take advantage of the opportunity I have today as we debate Bill C-378 to acknowledge all the work Arvida's Royal Canadian Legion Branch 209, with its president, Steeve Brown, and his whole team, has done. I would also like to acknowledge the work of the women's auxiliary members, who are always present at the activities and who also support veterans. I am proud to recognize their president, Annie Drolet, who is a constant presence.

I am talking about the Legion because the branch will be celebrating its 70th anniversary on December 3. That is extraordinary. I would like to share a little story. Arvida's Legion building needed some renovations and one veteran even mortgaged his home to get the money needed to redo the roof of the building where we still celebrate many events today. These are good people who are very committed. I am sure I will hear more of their stories on December 10 at the brunch celebrating the branch's 70th anniversary.

To come back to the bill, I would like to quote the Royal Canadian Legion, which said the following with regard to Bill C-378.

The federal government’s budget has checked off a couple more priorities from the Veterans Affairs Canada (VAC) mandate letter, but it certainly has missed the opportunity to deliver on key recommendations brought forward by the VAC ministerial advisory groups, specifically, the need for lifelong financial security for ill and injured veterans. Budget 2017 provides vague promises and no clarity on how the government will deliver lifelong financial security for our veterans and their families.

It has to be said: this bill is a step in the right direction, but it does not go far enough.

In conclusion, the NDP supports the improvement of services and pensions for veterans and their families. These changes are welcome, but they are nowhere near enough to give them what they desperately need. Action must be taken immediately to bolster pensions and mental health programs, increase the assistance offered to families, and improve career transition services for medically released veterans.

The NDP woul...”

Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)

November 30th
Hansard Link

Routine Proceedings

“... of the House have not necessarily perfectly represented the demographics of Canada. There are many families in Canada that have babies or young children, so their style of life is different. If that ...”

Mr. Serge Cormier

November 30th
Hansard Link

Routine Proceedings

“... three Yazidi refugees. We also reinstated the interim federal health program, and we are reuniting families more quickly by reducing wait times from over 26 months to 12 months. We amended the Citize...”

Ms. Jenny Kwan (Vancouver East, NDP)

November 30th
Hansard Link

Routine Proceedings

“...atives take advantage of those individuals' dreams of having a better life for themselves and their families. (1110)

I have to go back in history a bit. The regulatory body, which used to be the Canadian Society of Immigration Consultants, was the first governing body established in 2003 as an independent federally incorporated not-for-profit body operating at arm's length from the federal government and responsible for regulating paid immigration consultants. In 2004, CSIC was recognized in the regulations as the organization responsible for regulating paid immigration consultants.

Fast-forward to 2008, and the Standing Committee on Citizenship and Immigration undertook a study of the immigration consultants and its report highlighted issues with CSIC's governance and accountability framework, which did not ensure that immigration consultants were being adequately regulated in the public interest with respect to the provision of professional and ethical consultation, representation, and advice. That was back in 2008. Problems existed with the first self-regulatory agency, and the government undertook a study on this. It found all sorts of problems and then put forward the Immigration Consultants of Canada Regulatory Council, in this place, which was incorporated and came into force in October of 2014.

Just this year, we undertook to do a study and found that, lo and behold, problems exist with that regulatory body that was newly established, though maybe not so new because it was established back in 2014. The problems were so grave that the committee put forward a report with 21 recommendations, unanimously urging the government to act. It said the time for self-regulation of this industry has come to an end and it cannot be trusted to do this work. The situation goes on and on, and people continue to be hurt in the community. The committee called for the government to establish a government-regulated agency. Until the profession can prove that it can be trusted again, we cannot allow this path to continue. That is what we are talking about.

Let me highlight, by the way, what happened in committee, so every member of this House knows. The committee heard from some 50 witnesses during eight meetings that were held between March 6, 2017, and May 29, 2017. It received a number of written submissions as well. It was not as if it was a quick study. The committee did an in-depth study. A number of witnesses highlighted tremendous problems that have been going on with ICCRC, and said the time has come for drastic action to be taken by government.

Let me share the issues we face with members of the House. First, on the issue of investigation, the ICCRC is responsible for regulating paid immigration consultants. It also has the authority to investigate allegations of unethical or unprofessional behaviour of authorized immigration consultants. The RCMP and CBSA are both responsible for investigating authorized consultants who engage in fraud, and ghost consultants who operate outside the law governing immigration representatives. I bring this up as a major issue. Why is that? Let us take this information for a spin.

One witness at committee informed us that she trusted an immigration consultant with her live-in caregiver application and paid her for services, only to be left stranded one day after her arrival in Canada, with no employer, no financial resources, and none of her belongings. Sadly, this is a story we have heard before. In fact, there is a current class action lawsuit, which I will highlight later, on the vulnerabilities of many individuals like the witness who presented to the committee. While the in-depth problem is unknown to all of us, more and more stories of exploitation are emerging, and that is what we are seeing. (1115)

Currently, there are approximately 3,600 ICCRC members. ICCRC stated that it receives on average 300 complaints a year. As of the end of December 2016, there were 1,710 complaints filed against consultants, which is almost two complaints for every member. How is that the situation?

CBSA stated that it has 126 active investigations of immigration consultants related to the IRPA offences. In the context of the number of complaints we have, I submit that CBSA does not have enough resources to do its work.

I have a case that should be of interest to every single member in the House, and more importantly, to the government, because as I said, when we have unscrupulous practices taking place, such as these kinds of situations, they undermine our reputation as a country and undermine our immigration system.

It is inhumane for someone to take advantage of individuals and families who rely on them, who have scarce resources. They come up with the resources, because they desperately want to make sure that their applications are done properly and that they enhance their chance of success in getting a permanent pathway to Canada. However, when we allow the situation to continue, when we know about it, we are part of the problem. That cannot be allowed to happen.

I mentioned the class action lawsuit. Let me share this information with members of the House.

Canada has admitted more temporary foreign workers than immigrants since 2006. Migrant workers are desperate to seek opportunities to better their lives and those of their families. As a result, as I mentioned, they are often subject to abuse and exploitation.

Recen...”

Ms. Jenny Kwan

November 30th
Hansard Link

Routine Proceedings

“...orary foreign workers.

There are people who come to Canada who have been separated from their families, and some of them have been subjected to this kind of unscrupulous practice by bad immigrat...”

Mr. Randall Garrison (Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke, NDP)

November 30th
Hansard Link

Routine Proceedings

“... get answers from Immigration Canada, it sometimes causes people who are desperate to reunite their families and deal with these problems to maybe take leave of their critical faculties when dealing w...”

Ms. Monique Pauzé (Repentigny, BQ)

November 30th
Hansard Link

Standing Order 52

“...st now act accordingly and take action. Not only are these layoffs tragic for the workers and their families, they also affect national security and operational capacity.

Last Thursday, the comp...”

Mr. Randall Garrison (Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke, NDP)

November 30th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...y have cousins living on the other side of the border. They are not literally cousins, but language families. If a woman married into those nations, she lost her status in Canada, whereas a man did no...”

Mr. Anthony Housefather (Mount Royal, Lib.)

November 30th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...ely 850,000 Jews who had to leave Arab countries and Iran due to religious persecution.

Their families lived in these countries for many centuries, but in the years leading up to and following t...”

Mr. David Sweet (Flamborough—Glanbrook, CPC)

November 30th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“... Brith is doing truly outstanding work in honouring and educating people on the horrors that Jewish families and individuals have faced.

Mindful of the stories and memories of Jewish refugees on...”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

November 30th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ker, it is rather sad to hear such a question in the House. They have now decided to talk about our families. If the member has a question for me, let him ask me and I will answer.

What I can sa...”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

November 30th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...r parts of our platform, which are leading to much better situations for middle-class Canadians and families across this country. We will continue to work for them.”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

November 30th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...normous difference, with the fastest growth among G7 countries, with a huge difference for Canadian families.

The opposition does not want to talk about what is going on with Canadians. What it ...”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

November 30th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...s. That work is making a really important difference. We are seeing a better situation for Canadian families, 300,000 fewer children who will live in poverty this year, and a housing strategy that wil...”

Mr. Richard Hébert (Lac-Saint-Jean, Lib.)

November 29th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...ryone in my riding who placed their precious trust in me. Since October 23, I have been serving the families in my region. I am very proud to be the voice of the people of Lac-Saint-Jean.

Thank ...”

Mr. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, CPC)

November 29th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...the Liberal government to account. They want a government that puts the rights of victims and their families, not criminals, first. They want a government that does not give tax breaks with one hand a...”

Hon. Andrew Scheer (Leader of the Opposition, CPC)

November 29th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...he $10 billion that he promised; the wealthiest Canadians pay less tax, not more; and middle-class families are paying 80% more tax, not less. This minister cannot count and cannot follow the rules.<...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

November 29th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...reased taxes on the wealthiest 1%. He created the Canada child benefit, which helps nine out of ten families and which will lower child poverty by 40% across the country. He is giving more money to th...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

November 29th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...d taxes on the wealthiest 1%, and why we delivered a Canada child benefit that helps nine out of 10 families. Unfortunately, on that child benefit, members opposite, NDP and Conservative, voted agains...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

November 29th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ell that Canada has the strongest growth in the G7. We created 500,000 new jobs, and we are helping families across the country. We are going to continue in that direction.”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

November 29th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...lower taxes for the middle class, raising them on the wealthiest one per cent, and helping Canadian families.”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

November 29th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...tax cut for the middle class, and the tax hike for the wealthy are helping our communities, helping families, and helping individuals. That is what we are doing, and that is why the opposition members...”

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux (Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons, Lib.)

November 29th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...ruitment, intervening early to turn young Canadians away from the path of extremism, and supporting families and communities affected by radicalization.

I was involved with the youth justice com...”

Ms. Brigitte Sansoucy

November 29th
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“...being paid enough. Two hundred and sixty-five thousand is not just a number, it is human beings and families living under tremendous stress every day.

This burden is not theirs to bear, it is th...”

Ms. Jenny Kwan (Vancouver East, NDP)

November 29th
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“...Effectively, we have an immigration policy that aims to bar people with a disability and their families from being permanent residents in Canada. The minister recently said, "From a principled perspective, the current excessive demand policy simply does not align with our country's values on the inclusion of persons with disabilities in Canadian society."

The minister has been reviewing this policy for two years now. The policy continues to discriminate. Families continue to be hurt by it. If the minister is going to be true to his words, he needs to re...”

Ms. Rachael Harder (Lethbridge, CPC)

November 29th
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“...Madam Speaker, the Liberals' small business tax hikes continue to target hard-working middle-class families in Canada. Thousands of people in my riding are terrified that their businesses might go under due to the tax changes announced this summer.

These changes not only jeopardize their business, but also their economic well-being as families. For example, Charmaine, a new Canadian in my riding, shared her heartbreaking circumstances with me. I want to quote her directly. She said, “I am the sole breadwinner for my family. My husband is abroad.... I have three children struggling with university and high school studies. My father-in-law stays with me who is dependent on me.... These taxes would leave me in more debts and would adversely affect the entire family and create an obstacle for us to settle down in Canada.”

Unlike the finance minister, local business owners in my riding and all across Canada do not have the luxury of tucking away millions of dollars for a rainy day. They are hard-working, visionary, risk takers. They are Canadians who make approximately $75,000 or less per year. The minister calls these individuals “fat cats”; I call them job creators.

My riding is home to many farms and ag operators or producers. When I talk about this, I am talking about small businesses. I am talking about families who work together. I am talking about parents, children, and perhaps grandparents, who are all part of the operation. Together, they work as a collective to make sure their business thrives.

The Liberal government has promised to target these hard-working families, who will now have their businesses scrutinized by bureaucrats here in Ottawa. The CRA tax ...”

Mrs. Carol Hughes (Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing, NDP)

November 28th
Hansard Link

Routine Proceedings

“...ized with eating disorders. The petitioners indicate that more than one million Canadians and their families suffer. They also indicate that sufferers of eating disorders have a long wait list if they...”

Mr. Peter Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby, NDP)

November 28th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“As you know, Madam Speaker, we now have a record debt load for average Canadian families, the worst in the industrialized world. If that is something the finance minister is proud ...”

Hon. Bill Morneau

November 28th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ut this morning. We are going to talk about how we are continuing to make a difference for Canadian families, a difference that has been enormous over the last couple of years and we will continue to ...”

Hon. Bill Morneau

November 28th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...re seeing 500,000 new jobs. I hope the member opposite is pleased with the fact that nine out of 10 families are seeing more money because of the Canada child benefit. Because of the positive economic...”

Hon. Bill Morneau

November 28th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...reach the lowest unemployment rate in a decade, they obviously do not want to talk about that. When families are doing better because they have more money in their pockets, they obviously do not want ...”

Hon. Bill Morneau

November 28th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ays more that can be done. We want to continue improving the lives of the middle class and Canadian families.”

Mr. Harold Albrecht (Kitchener—Conestoga, CPC)

November 28th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...want to thank my colleague for standing up for democracy and for the hard-earned dollars that young families are contributing through their taxes. The government continues to squander that.

When...”

Mr. Robert-Falcon Ouellette (Winnipeg Centre, Lib.)

November 28th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“..., “We will give him food and sustenance. We will provide him with something to feed himself and his families.” They had a treaty. They had a relationship with each other. It was not something to be ta...”

Mr. Ken McDonald (Avalon, Lib.)

November 28th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...se of this positive approach that we as a government are able to continue investing in middle-class families, in hard-working Canadians, and in small businesses.

The finance minister announced in October that, because of this growth, our government is going to reinvest in our Canada child benefit two years ahead of schedule by making annual cost-of-living increases to the CCB starting in July next year. For all the families in my riding of Avalon, the Canada child benefit gives them the extra money they need to ensure that raising their children is a little easier. For these families, knowing that they will receive an increase in their monthly benefit will mean that they will have the comfort they need to grow and thrive.

As of July 2017, the Canada child benefit monthly payments in my riding have totalled over $3.8 million, helping over 13,000 kids and their families. This is the type of investment that truly matters to Canadians, especially to the constitu...”

Mr. Jean-Claude Poissant (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food, Lib.)

November 28th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...t that currently applies to cash tickets for deliveries of listed grains.

We want to see farm families succeed. That is why we are working so that all family business owners retain the ability t...”

Hon. Kevin Sorenson (Battle River—Crowfoot, CPC)

November 28th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... that gives absolutely no indication as to when it will stop. The debt is continuing to grow.

Families, small businesses, the middle class and those struggling to join it cannot perpetually operate their households in the red. They cannot perpetually, year after year, continue to spend more than they have.

Millionaires and billionaires spend. They have no problem sometimes accumulating debt if they see that it will pay off in the end. They typically borrow money and know they will have to pay off that debt. We have a millionaire Prime Minister and finance minister who are having more fun now because they are borrowing money that the future generation will have to pay off.

Families cannot operate this way. When annual economic growth is moderate or high, families know they have to save for a rainy day, but not the Liberals. The Liberals borrow money during prosperous times, and why not? It is not their money. They are borrowing money that other people will have to pay back, including my grandchildren.

Families scrimp and save because they know that things can happen that cost money. If the furnace breaks down, given the climate in this country, a new one must be purchased. That is when a family tries to find savings to pay off that furnace. Families do not borrow money to buy a new furnace with no intention of ever paying that money back, ...”

Mr. Darrell Samson (Sackville—Preston—Chezzetcook, Lib.)

November 28th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... $5.2 million per month.

I wonder if my colleagues can tell us how many children in their own families receive the Canada child benefit.”

Mr. Alupa Clarke (Beauport—Limoilou, CPC)

November 28th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“Mr. Speaker, Christmas is a holy day where families come together to share love, happiness, and stories. In Beauport—Limoilou, thousands of families will get together to celebrate Christmas. This Christmas season, I look forward to welcomin...”

Mr. Francesco Sorbara (Vaughan—Woodbridge, Lib.)

November 28th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...aughter Enza pledged to learn more about mental health, hoping to prevent such heartbreak for other families.

Enza and Benny Caringi co-founded Hats On For Awareness.[Translation]

This org...”

Mr. Gord Johns (Courtenay—Alberni, NDP)

November 28th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...ersity president Dr. Ralph Nilson and his team for their work in registering children of low-income families in this important program, but we still have more work to do.

I call on community groups and volunteers to follow the lead of the VIU, as only a fraction of eligible children have been registered for this incredible program. I urge the government to increase its funding for these local initiatives and make it easier to register children into this program so we we can create a path to health and prosperity for low-income families. One child living in poverty is one child too many.”

Hon. Denis Paradis (Brome—Missisquoi, Lib.)

November 28th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...ent.

Our governments announced $290 million to connect our communities, and more than 100,000 families will benefit. This is great news for all rural regions of Quebec.

Within a few weeks,...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

November 28th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...n the wealthiest 1%. He delivered on a Canada child benefit that is helping nine out of 10 Canadian families and reducing child poverty by 40%. He strengthened the CPP for a generation with a historic...”

Ms. Karine Trudel (Jonquière, NDP)

November 27th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“... forest resource is nearby, and we already have sawmills. This bill would help create jobs and keep families in the region.

The exodus of young people and families is a problem we deal with every day in Saguenay—Lac-Saint-Jean. Developing secondary and tertiary products could not only help create and maintain jobs, but also help keep our families in the Saguenay—Lac-Saint-Jean region.

I would like to point out three other importan...”

Mr. Joël Lightbound (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance, Lib.)

November 27th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...he education and training they need to find good jobs and build good lives for themselves and their families. Our plan is working. Youth unemployment is now the lowest on record.

To conclude, th...”

Mr. Bob Saroya (Markham—Unionville, CPC)

November 27th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“.... One thing was common, Canadians are overwhelmingly concerned about how their businesses and their families will make ends meet.

My constituents of Markham—Unionville are concerned about the Liberal government's economic update. The cycle of debt and deficit is not the key to success. Sensible budgeting and limited government are what will allow our economy to flourish. The same free market principles that allow small businesses to be successful can be applied to our economy. The free market allows for optimal allocation of resources, incentives to work hard, and more freedom.

This is why I stand here today to speak against the government's out-of-control spending and huge deficits that will leave our children to pick up the bill. I stand today as the voice of taxpayers, the average Canadian, and fight every day to leave money in the hands of the people who earned it, not to be foolishly spent by the Liberal government. Businesses have to find ways to stretch a dollar but the government throws it away. We saw this foolish pattern in the previous budget, the fall economic statement, and now in the budget implementation bill. This jut confirms to Canadians that the government cannot be trusted with our nation's finances.

Let me highlight what the record shows.

First, budget 2017 projected a $28.5-billion deficit for the 2017-18 fiscal year. This is almost triple the Liberal promise of a small $10-billion deficit.

Second, the 2017 fall economic update confirmed the government was still spending double its promised small $10-billion deficit.

Third, the Liberals have broken their promise to balance the budget in 2019 and have no plan to return to balanced budgets. This is simply irresponsible.

Finally, under the Liberal government, more than 80% of middle-class Canadians are paying more taxes today than they were paying in 2015 under the former Conservative government.

It is clear that the Liberal government does not have the best interests of Canadians in mind. Bill C-63 shows us that the finance minister is good at spending other people's money. It is a shame that the government continually attacks those who create wealth, are entrepreneurial, and want to work hard to succeed. We saw this just a few months ago when the finance minister introduced tax planning using private corporations.

Canadians are scared to do business at home. There is no incentive and they are taxed out of the market. Almost every day I hear another example of an entrepreneur, a doctor, a small corporation leaving our country to do business south the border.

This trend cannot continue. We need to allow a healthy environment for businesses to flourish for our economy and in turn our country to be successful. On top of businesses leaving, the debt and deficit continue to rise. It is like the finance minister cannot help himself. The previous Conservative government did right by Canadians.

According to Finance Canada, there was a surplus of $3.2 billion at the end of 2015. The Liberals cannot accept the fact that we balanced the budget in 2014-15, and we did so ahead of our original schedule.

The last economic outlook given by the Minister of Finance showed that revenues were holding up better than expected. GDP growth in the last quarter of 2015 was also higher than expected. (1300)

The previous Conservative government created jobs during the worst economic downturn since the great recession. Canada had the best job creation and economic growth record among G7 countries.

The previous Conservative government balanced the budget. After running a targeted simultaneous program that created and maintained approximately 200,000 jobs, it kept its promise to balance the budget, and it left the Liberals with a $3.2 billion surplus at the end of 2015.

The previous Conservative government lowered taxes. We reduced taxes to their lowest point in 50 years, with a typical family of four saving almost $7,000 per year.

The previous Conservative government created approximately 1.3 million net new jobs, the most per capita in the G7. These were high-quality jobs, with 80% of them full-time and another 80% of them in the private sector.

The Prime Minister and the finance minister were lucky enough to inherit good fortune in the form of a balanced budget and a recovering economy thanks to the Conservatives. However, their carelessness and mismanagement spent this good fortune very quickly.

Here we are now halfway through the Liberal government's mandate and all we can see is that the Prime Minister is giving with one hand while taking with the other. This is not sustainable, this is not responsible, and Canadians are concerned.

In order to feed their greedy spending, the Liberals have raised taxes on hydro, gasoline, home heating, health and dental benefits, employee discounts, personal savings, life-saving therapies, and of course local businesses.

The government is hurting the very people it claims to want to help. Job creating businesses will not invest in the Canadian economy if they do not know the cost of doing business. Saddling businesses with higher taxes, changing the rules of the game when they are not looking, and handing borrowed money from one politician to another is not going to create jobs. Mom and pop shops will face higher taxes, which will put many out of business.

It is high tax hypocrisy for the Prime Minister and finance minister to force middle-class Canadians to pay for the government's out-of-control spending while their family fortunes remain untouched. Too many Canadian families are already struggling to make ends meet. They cannot afford to be taxed further.

I a...”

Mr. Matt DeCourcey (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs, Lib.)

November 27th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...of Canadians receive more in a simpler, more generous, and tax-free Canada child benefit that helps families with the monthly cost of child care and has lift hundreds of thousands of children out of p...”

Mr. Gérard Deltell (Louis-Saint-Laurent, CPC)

November 27th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...he middle-class family is paying more taxes. According to a Fraser Institute study, 80% of Canadian families are paying, on average, $840 more than they did under our government.[English]

Let me read a statement by Mr. Charles Lammam, director of fiscal studies at the Fraser Institute, on measuring the impact of the federal personal income tax changes on middle-income Canadian families. He said:

The federal government has repeatedly claimed they've lowered income taxes for the middle class while in reality, taking their major income tax changes into account, they've actually raised taxes on the vast majority of middle-class families. [Translation]

The Fraser Institute is speaking out against the Liberal government's flawed measures that are costing middle-class families more money, among others.

The Liberal government did away with the child fitness and ...”

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux (Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons, Lib.)

November 27th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ucts. Through measures such as the Canada child benefit, we see money being put into the pockets of families so they can spend it on our small businesses.

Would the member agree that the proacti...”

Mr. Ken McDonald (Avalon, Lib.)

November 27th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...nada child benefit that was changed under the government, and the increase in payments that went to families. I know in my riding of Avalon, 9,280 households received cheques, averaging $5,180 per month, for a total from July 1, 2016 to June 30, 2017 of $47.9 million that went to families in my riding. These are families that needed that money. They did not tuck it away in a bank account and save it. They spent it. That shows the way that the economy is going now, and the unemployment rate, which is the lowest in a decade.

Could the member comment on how that is affecting families in her riding?”

Ms. Rachel Blaney

November 27th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... for day care.

I encourage the government to listen to the people of Canada, to listen to the families, and to hear what they are saying about how expensive child care is. It has not created one child care space in this budget, nor in the last budget. This is really needed. This is about being a feminist country that supports women entering the workforce, and supports families. It is good that they get some money, but the reality is that the money does not come even close to covering the cost of day care.

It is the government's responsibility to work, on all fronts, to support families.”

Mr. Kevin Waugh (Saskatoon—Grasswood, CPC)

November 27th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...o Ms. Meghan Markle. The couple became engaged earlier this month.

With the blessing of their families, the couple is planning to wed next spring. Following the nuptials, the couple will reside ...”

Mr. David Anderson (Cypress Hills—Grasslands, CPC)

November 27th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...iety and denigrate what it means to be Canadian.

Today we mourn for the worshippers and their families. We extend our heartfelt condolences to the people of Egypt, and we unequivocally condemn t...”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

November 27th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ith the Canada child benefit putting an average of $2,300 more after-tax income into nine out of 10 families' pockets. What we are seeing is an improved economy, helping middle-class Canadians. That i...”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

November 27th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...and, that the policies we have put in place are making an enormous positive difference for Canadian families. By introducing the Canada child benefit, we are helping nine out of 10 families do much better. By indexing that benefit, we will see it keep up with inflation. We are als...”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

November 27th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... to talk about our economy, which is performing really well. There is very good growth for Canadian families, and the situation for the middle class is much better. We will pursue our policy to improv...”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

November 27th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...g that we believe was absolutely the right thing to do. We did raise taxes on the top 1%, including families like mine—”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

November 27th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...s we put in place are making a better situation for our economy and a better situation for Canadian families. Middle-class Canadians are feeling much more secure two years into this government than th...”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

November 27th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...nts.

We will work on behalf of Canadians to make sure that our economy stays strong and their families stay strong, for today and for tomorrow.”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

November 27th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... we would take a look at the Canada child benefit and increase it significantly while helping those families who needed it most.

These promises were kept to make sure that our economy would grow...”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

November 27th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...h is growing the economy, making sure we have jobs that are helping Canadians, and making sure that families are doing better. That is what we will continue to focus on.”

Hon. Jean-Yves Duclos (Minister of Families, Children and Social Development, Lib.)

November 27th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...vernment that believes the employment insurance system has a role to play in providing an income to families going through hard times and to communities that are suffering.

Since 2016, we have i...”

Mr. Alexandre Boulerice (Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, NDP)

November 27th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...urn of Ciné-cadeau. We are all very excited to see Asterix and Obelix again.

However, for the families of Davie shipyard workers, the holidays are unlikely to be happy. Those workers delivered A...”

Hon. Carla Qualtrough (Minister of Public Services and Procurement, Lib.)

November 27th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...Mr. Speaker, our government is always concerned about the impact of job losses on workers and their families. We know that the people at Davie do excellent work.

Our government has been in touch...”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

November 27th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... Canadians to improve our economic situation and to make things better for the middle class and for families across Canada.

Fortunately, our policies are working. We have the highest rate of eco...”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

November 27th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...nomic growth and the lowest rate of unemployment in a decade. This is a very good news for Canadian families. We will continue to work for them in order to improve our situation in the future.”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

November 27th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...We are going to continue to do that, because we know that not only are they helping middle-class families, they are actually helping our economy to grow. That is why we are so proud of what has bee...”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

November 27th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...inking about how we could means test the Canada child benefit, providing much more for middle-class families. Those policies ushered in a rate of growth that the previous government could only have hoped for in its wildest dreams. We have seen a positive situation for families across our country.”

Hon. Carla Qualtrough (Minister of Public Services and Procurement, Lib.)

November 27th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...Mr. Speaker, our government is always concerned about the impact of job losses on workers and their families. We recognize the excellent work of Davie employees. Over the past few weeks, our governmen...”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

November 27th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...member just listed.

We know that higher costs associated with housing in the north leave many families with core housing needs. This is why last week, building on funding committed in budget 201...”

Mr. Peter Fragiskatos (London North Centre, Lib.)

November 27th
Hansard Link

Points of Order

“... previous government have a tax applied to it? Our CCB has no tax applied to it and 90% of Canadian families are doing better as a result.”

Mr. David Sweet (Flamborough—Glanbrook, CPC)

November 24th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...t and the pain, the suffering. We have felt the consequences most directly as many, too many, other families have.

Our heart aches thinking about what could have been, what should have been, had...”

Mr. Bob Saroya (Markham—Unionville, CPC)

November 24th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ost every day who are confused about this legislation and are worried about what it means for their families. The Liberal government cannot recklessly continue to push through this legislation.

We know that marijuana is a dangerous drug. We know that it is damaging to the human body and addictive. We know it causes harmful effects on youth brain development and greater incidents of psychosis and schizophrenia. However, despite all of these side effects, the Liberal government is set to ensure that marijuana will be legal by July 1, 2018.

I oppose this legislation entirely. I choose to listen to the concerns raised by the scientists, doctors, and law enforcement officials. I want to advocate for the voices that are not being heard with respect to this legislation, those who say it is being rushed through without proper planning or consideration for the negative consequences of such complicated legislation.

The passing of Bill C-45 would lead to negative repercussions at the global level. I have spoken before to this concern, but it is an important one. If this legislation passes, Canada will be in violation of three international treaties. Therefore, how can Canada hold other countries to account on their treaty obligations when Canada does not honour its own?

There are various issues regarding this legislation, which has led me to conclude that it is thoughtless, irresponsible, and rushed. The only goal it has is to reach the arbitrary deadline of July 1, 2018. The Liberal government is not listening to the medical professionals. It is not listening to our police forces. It is not even listening to the concerned Canadians, who believe that this bill is fundamentally flawed and is being rushed through Parliament in order to meet this arbitrary and irresponsible deadline. For these reasons, and many more, I am entirely opposed to this legislation. The science is clear that marijuana is dangerous.

I want to touch further on the issues with respect to our children and families. The last thing we want is youth consumption to increase. We do not want our children to ha...”

Mr. Tom Kmiec (Calgary Shepard, CPC)

November 24th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...vide timely life-saving assistance in the face of disaster.

We share in the grief of affected families and let us offer a helping hand in their time of need.”

Ms. Pam Goldsmith-Jones (West Vancouver—Sunshine Coast—Sea to Sky Country, Lib.)

November 24th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...voted to the lives of children who live with life-limiting conditions and to supporting hundreds of families since 1995, believing that whether life is measured in weeks or months, all children deserv...”

Ms. Pam Damoff (Oakville North—Burlington, Lib.)

November 24th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...ism against gender-based violence to reflect on the impact of gender-based violence on individuals, families, and communities. Status of Women Canada will be joining the Canadian Football League at th...”

Mr. Joël Lightbound (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance, Lib.)

November 24th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...is look back at measures they put forward, such as doubling the TFSA limit and income splitting for families, which we know benefited the 5% or 10% of the wealthiest Canadians.”

Mr. Gagan Sikand (Mississauga—Streetsville, Lib.)

November 24th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... of sexual violence in her lifetime. Gender-based violence has a devastating impact on individuals, families, and communities. Recent high-profile events continue to shine a light on the immediate nee...”

Mr. Sven Spengemann (Mississauga—Lakeshore, Lib.)

November 24th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...educing homelessness and poverty.[English]

Can the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Families, Children and Social Development share with this House how seniors like those in my riding...”

Hon. Carla Qualtrough (Minister of Public Services and Procurement, Lib.)

November 24th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...dam Speaker, our government is always concerned about the impact of job losses on workers and their families.

We recognize the excellent work of Davie employees. Over the past few weeks, our gov...”

Mr. Bob Saroya (Markham—Unionville, CPC)

November 24th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...easily become an organized crime network, and this could happen next door to anyone.

Canadian families expect safe and healthy communities in which to raise their children. We are parliamentaria...”

Mr. Gérard Deltell (Louis-Saint-Laurent, CPC)

November 24th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...zation, of drug use in Canada.

This is all so sad. Not only will marijuana be normalized, but families will be rent apart, bonds will be broken, children will be cast into an abyss of darkness a...”

Mr. Kelly McCauley (Edmonton West, CPC)

November 24th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... to legally have up to seven joints. We hear that the solution to youth using marijuana is to allow families to grow seven pot plants of unlimited height in every single household and apartment in the...”

Mr. Ziad Aboultaif (Edmonton Manning, CPC)

November 24th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...t of this bill is not something as harmful, as unfair, and as much of a risk as it presently is for families and people. Therefore, if I have 20 seconds, I would like to list the following problems: i...”

Ms. Sheri Benson

November 24th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...ing shelters are a different group of people now, including more people over the age of 50 and more families. In many communities the largest demographic using shelters is indigenous people.

Thi...”

Mrs. Bernadette Jordan (South Shore—St. Margarets, Lib.)

November 24th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...y our advisory committee on homelessness. Chaired by the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Families, Children and Social Development this advisory committee brought together housing and homelessness experts, local and regional service providers, and individuals with a lived experience of homelessness. Selected from hundreds of nominations, the 13 members of this advisory committee represent Canada's regional, cultural, and linguistic diversity.

The advisory committee held a series of regional round tables across the country with stakeholders, service providers, and indigenous partners, in which they explored in greater depth the ideas and the recommendations we heard throughout the national housing strategy engagement process. They also undertook targeted engagement with homelessness experts and with communities and other stakeholders from across Canada. I am pleased to say that several members of Parliament attended these round tables and saw first-hand the work being done by this exceptional group of people.

I will also note that the advisory committee's work was augmented by an online feedback tool hosted by Employment and Social Development Canada, which was available from July 17 to September 15, 2017.

I am sure I speak for everyone in the House when I say that I am looking forward to the committee's “What We Heard” report, which is expected to be publicly released in spring 2018.

Even without that report I can say that the people who participated in our consultations did not just identify problems, they also identified opportunities for innovation and proposed solutions that focus on measurable outcomes. All of this information and insight was invaluable as our government sought to create a national housing strategy that signalled a meaningful re-engagement by the federal government in housing.

Make no mistake. If ever there was a time for meaningful re-engagement, it is now. For too many Canadian families, a decent home is simply not affordable. Across Canada, 1.7 million families are in housing need, living in homes that are inadequate or unaffordable. Another 25,000 Canadians are chronically homeless.

On top of this, many groups, including seniors, indigenous peoples, women fleeing domestic violence, people with disabilities, refugees, veterans, and those with mental health and addiction challenges continue to face significant barriers in accessing and maintaining affordable housing.

Even before the national housing strategy, our government had signalled that we understood the need for an active federal government in addressing housing needs across Canada. That is why we made unprecedented housing investments in budgets 2016 and 2017.

The national housing strategy, however, takes our commitment even further. It is an ambitious $40-billion plan to help ensure that Canadians have access to housing that meets their needs and that they can afford. It is a key element of our government's plan to help grow and strengthen the middle class, promote inclusive growth for Canadians, and lift more Canadians out of poverty. (1340)

It includes clear goals, such as removing 530,000 Canadian families from housing need, and reducing chronic and episodic homelessness by half over the next decade. It will meet the needs of vulnerable populations and will be central to our effort to ensure that all Canadians have the safe and affordable housing they need and deserve.

What does the national housing strategy mean for Canada's homeless? For starters, we will be investing $2.2 billion over 10 years to tackle homelessness through a redesigned and expanded federal homelessness program. Thanks to this investment, we will reduce chronic homelessness by 50%. Just as importantly, we will empower local communities to deliver a combination of housing programs and responsive and preventive measures.

Our redesigned homelessness program will launch on April 1, 2019, following the conclusion of the current homelessness partnering strategy, and it will be based on the work currently being done by the advisory committee on homelessness.

Our government also recognizes that homelessness is not an issue that exists in isolation. If we want to help vulnerable populations, we need to think of housing in a more holistic way. That is precisely what the NHS does, with complementary initiatives that reaffirm and redesign the federal response to homelessness. This includes a program like the Canada housing benefit, a jointly funded $4 billion program that will provide affordability support directly to families and individuals in housing need, including people currently living in social housing, peopl...”

Ms. Emmanuella Lambropoulos (Saint-Laurent, Lib.)

November 24th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...epresenting marginalized populations, including people who had experienced homelessness, low-income families, aboriginal people living off-reserve, seniors, people with disabilities and newcomers.

These events generated a series of recommendations on strengthening the federal government's response to homelessness. For example, participants recommended that the homelessness partnering strategy be renewed and expanded, and that the “housing first” approach of the program be more flexible and responsive.

The message was clear. Canadians want improved housing conditions, especially those who need it the most.

The homelessness partnering strategy was also part of the consultations. Budget 2017 includes a total investment of $2.1 billion through the national housing strategy to increase funding for the homelessness partnering strategy. We have also committed to work with stakeholders, provinces and territories and aboriginal organizations to revamp the program to better reduce and prevent homelessness. (1410)

To that end, we created an advisory committee on homelessness chaired by the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Families, Children and Social Development for Housing and Urban Affairs. It includes members who are...”

Mrs. Carol Hughes (Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing, NDP)

November 23rd
Hansard Link

Routine Proceedings

“...as seven are diagnosed with eating disorders, that more than one million Canadians suffer, and that families have been negatively affected. It also indicates that the damage it causes can affect the b...”

Mr. Joël Lightbound (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance, Lib.)

November 23rd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...g from that tax cut.

In addition, thanks to the Canada child benefit, nine out of 10 Canadian families are receiving more in child benefits than they did under the previous system. We also estim...”

Mr. Joël Lightbound

November 23rd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...ada child benefit with our government to find ways to make it more progressive and to better target families who need it the most. The government stopped sending cheques to millionaire families like the previous government did.

The minister also looked at the increased limit for the tax free savings account. Hon. members will recall that the Conservatives increased the TFSA limit to $11,000 and did so with great fanfare. The American who came up this concept in the first place said that this was absolutely crazy, and that it would put the government in a fiscal straitjacket. However, when the Conservative government's then finance minister was asked what he would do for future generations, when the government was starved of money for carrying out its duties, he said that we should leave that problem to Stephen Harper's granddaughter to solve.

We are not leaving any problems for anyone's granddaughter. We are dealing with issues that affect Canadians today, and that is precisely what we did when we introduced the Canada child benefit.

I am very proud to say that in our fall economic statement last month, we took steps to further strengthen the Canada child benefit by proposing to index it to inflation almost two years ahead of schedule, starting in July 2018. This will ensure that as the cost of living rises, so does the Canada child benefit, which is important to Canadian families. This is our focus on this side of the House.

A strengthened Canada child benefit means additional support to help pay for books, winter jackets, and skating lessons. These are the kinds of things Canadian families need.

The added confidence the Canada child benefit brings to families has been shown to have an immediate impact on economic growth. Canada is the fastest-growing economy in the G7. We are not stopping there, and neither is the Minister of Finance. In the fall economic statement, we also announced that we would provide more support for low-income workers.

Starting in 2019, the government will enhance the working income tax benefit, or WITB, by an additional $500 million per year.

This will put more money in the pockets of low-income workers, including families without children and the growing number of single Canadians. This enhancement will be in addition to the increase of about $250 million annually that will come into effect in that year as part of the enhancement of the Canada pension plan.

By these two actions alone, the government will boost the total amount spent on the working income tax benefit by about 65% in 2019, increasing benefits to current recipients and expanding the number of Canadians who receive this much needed support.

When we compare this to the former government's measures, such as the increase to the TFSA contribution limit and income splitting for families, which, as the parliamentary budget officer indicated at the time, benefited the wealthiest...”

Mr. Joël Lightbound

November 23rd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...of the $11 billion federal investment in home care and mental health care. This means that Canadian families can look forward to better health care support, particularly in the urgent priorities of ho...”

Mr. Joël Lightbound

November 23rd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...oo busy showering tax breaks on the wealthy to worry about social housing needs, inequality, or the families in my riding who were having trouble making ends meet, like my own family did when I was a ...”

Mr. Joël Lightbound

November 23rd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...d will work with the Ethics Commissioner.

As far as talking points are concerned, for me, the families that I represent in my riding, and the food banks that I have visited, the Canada child ben...”

Mr. Joël Lightbound

November 23rd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...it offensive when members say that this is a talking point, because for me when I was a kid and the families I represent, this is not a talking point. It is more money at the end of the month and repr...”

Mr. Kyle Peterson

November 23rd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...s and dads, so they can pay off debt, buy hockey equipment or healthier food for their children and families.

Everywhere we look, there are signs of progress for the middle class. Over 500,000 jobs have been created since 2015 and the unemployment rate is nearly the lowest it has been in a decade. Canadian economic growth has accelerated sharply since the second half of 2016. Over the last four quarters, the Canadian economy has had its fastest rate of growth in more than 10 years, and growth is forecast to be 3.1% in 2017, significantly above expectations at the beginning of this year.

These gains, coupled with a better-than-expected fiscal outcome in 2016-17, have resulted in a real positive improvement to our budget outlook. In fact, Canada's fiscal outlook has improved by over $6.5 billion annually, on average, compared to what we were expecting in March. The federal debt-to-GDP ratio has been firmly placed on a downward track, with Canada's net debt-to-GDP ratio projected to remain the lowest in the G7. Our government and the finance minister are committed to preserving Canada's low-debt advantage for current and future generations.

The actions the government has taken are having a real positive impact on our economy and for Canadians.

I would now like to go into more detail about how the government's recent fall economic statement proposes to keep us on this positive track.

Canada's fast-growing economy is giving our government the ability to reinvest the benefits of growth back into the people have who contributed most to that success. This is why we are strengthening the Canada child benefit, to ensure it continues to play a vital role in supporting families for years to come. The CCB will be strengthened by making annual cost of living increases s...”

Mr. Kyle Peterson

November 23rd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...in his public duties? How else would Canada lead the G7 in growth, at 3.7%? How else could Canadian families be so confident in the economy, if the finance minister were not doing his public duties pr...”

Mr. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, CPC)

November 22nd
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“Mr. Speaker, I rise to speak to a matter of deep concern for the tens of thousands of families who each year experience the most horrific of circumstances, that of finding a loved one missing. Anyone who has experienced the tragic loss of a family member or close friend will tell us that closure is an important part of the healing process, but for so many Canadian families with missing loved ones, this process cannot even begin. Canada has many national days of o...”

Mr. Robert Oliphant (Don Valley West, Lib.)

November 22nd
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...of Nigeria, especially those injured and their loved ones. We extend our deepest condolences to the families of the victims of this heinous crime. An injury to one is an injury to all.

Today, mo...”

Ms. Joyce Murray (Vancouver Quadra, Lib.)

November 22nd
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...nize National Housing Day. Safe and affordable housing is central to our lives, our health, and our families. It is essential to vibrant communities and a strong middle class.

Vancouverites from...”

Mr. Alain Rayes (Richmond—Arthabaska, CPC)

November 22nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, the reality is that 81% of Canadian families are paying more taxes under this government.

My question is simple and perfectly vali...”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

November 22nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, the reality is that nine out of 10 families are better off since we introduced the Canada child benefit. Thanks to this very important benefit, families are now receiving an average of $2,300 more to help improve their situation. That is a significant and very positive change for Canadian families. We are going to continue to work for them.”

Mr. Alexandre Boulerice (Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, NDP)

November 22nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...infrastructure privatization bank? Done. Legalization of cannabis? Full steam ahead.

However, families who need help paying the rent will have to wait until after the next election. The Liberals...”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

November 22nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...pent on a national housing strategy. Today, we are unveiling how we will make a huge difference for families across this country. It is an important day for Canadian families. It is an important day for housing.”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

November 22nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...istoric role that has not been taken for 50 years in housing, making a huge difference for Canadian families. Important work and an important job are getting done today.”

Hon. Bill Morneau

November 22nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...role that has not been taken for 50 years in housing, distributing a huge amount of help to 500,000 families, allowing them to have more money in their pocket for housing, and a key to a house. This i...”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

November 22nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... are focused on making sure the economy grows. We are focused on making sure that it helps Canadian families.

Those two things are demonstrably having an impact. We have seen the highest level o...”

Ms. Marjolaine Boutin-Sweet (Hochelaga, NDP)

November 22nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...on to believe that they will do the same thing with the housing strategy. Some 1.7 million Canadian families are having a hard time finding places to live.

Will the government create a true part...”

Hon. Bill Morneau

November 22nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...e working for on behalf of Canadians, and that is having a real impact. The kind of impact Canadian families can see.

They can see it with more money in their pockets, because of the Canada chil...”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

November 22nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...eing that the work we are doing, investing in Canadians, is paying off. Canadians are doing better. Families are doing better. We are seeing a huge benefit to Canadian families. More money in their pockets means our economy is doing better. We will continue to focus o...”

Ms. Sheila Malcolmson (Nanaimo—Ladysmith, NDP)

November 22nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ttention to its recommendations, but nothing has changed. The Liberals have broken their promise to families to do everything in their power to help this vital inquiry succeed.

When will the Lib...”

Hon. Carolyn Bennett (Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs, Lib.)

November 22nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...t is able to do its work effectively.

Our government remains fully committed to ensuring that families get the answers they have been waiting for.”

Ms. Cheryl Hardcastle (Windsor—Tecumseh, NDP)

November 22nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...al disorders ineligible for the disability tax credit, despite having receiving it for years.

Families are desperate for help. When will the government stop making excuses and fix this problem?<...”

Mr. Pat Kelly (Calgary Rocky Ridge, CPC)

November 22nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... and disconnected. The government is raising taxes on diabetics, small businesses, and middle-class families, and it will not even pick up the phone to answer questions.

Why does the government ...”

Mr. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River–Parkland, CPC)

November 22nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...urderer refused to reveal the location of their remains.

Convicted murderers who re-victimize families by withholding the whereabouts of their victims' remains should not be eligible for parole. Will the Minister of Justice do the right thing and pass legislation that will fix our broken parole system to ensure closure for families like the McCanns?”

Mr. Peter Schiefke (Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister (Youth), Lib.)

November 22nd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...Each of these pillars is critical for my community of Vaudreuil—Soulanges where thousands of new families settle each year, making it one of the fastest-growing ridings in the country. However, they also apply from coast to coast to coast, and work to address challenges we face with our provincial and territorial partners.

Our aim is to set a framework that the provinces and the territories can expand on in ways that best suit them. Our plan will succeed because the cannabis act works with our partners while safeguarding the underlying principles protecting our youth and keeping money out of the hands of criminals.

Working with our provincial partners and, in particular, my community of Vaudreuil—Soulanges, and the Government of Quebec is the cornerstone of this new approach. Last week, the Quebec government's cannabis legislation was tabled in the national assembly. Its legislation is complementary to the partnership we have established to ensure safety and security for our young people and for our communities.

In Quebec, the government will be creating the société québécoise du cannabis, a parallel body to the Société des alcools du Québec. This model has worked in Quebec to support alcohol regulation and I am confident our partners will get the needs of Quebecers right in cannabis legalization as well.

The strict regulation of cannabis under the cannabis act is designed, first and foremost, to protect Canada's young people. This is particularly important to me as parliamentary secretary to the Prime Minister for youth, and also as a father of two young children. It is also a priority for the young families that choose to call my community of Vaudreuil—Soulanges home. I am sure all members in the ...”

Mr. Guy Lauzon (Stormont—Dundas—South Glengarry, CPC)

November 22nd
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...for Great Britain, it did create massive pressure on the social networks of the larger cities. Many families found themselves destitute, with thousands of children falling through the cracks. Many children began living on the streets, while others were placed in orphanages. For every child, there was a different circumstance that put him or her in need of care and support.

With so many children living on the streets or in orphanages, a movement emerged in which individuals, philanthropists, faith-based groups, and charitable organizations sought to care for these unfortunate children. For the most part, these people and organizations, often referred to as “child savers”, felt they were doing a good and noble thing for the children. Maria Rye brought the first group of British children to Canada in 1869, housing the children in a refurbished jail in Niagara-on-the-Lake until she was able to find families that would take them in.

Following Maria Rye's lead, approximately 50 individuals or organizations over the next eight decades brought or sent children to Canada. They believed these children had a better chance for a healthy, moral life in the vastness of rural Canada, where food, fresh air, land, and opportunities flourished. It is also common knowledge that healthy, strong children could be of great benefit as labourers in a very young and expanding country.

With everything they owned packed in small boxes, trunks, or bags, these children started their new lives in Canada. Canada was seen as the country of milk and honey and a new life seemed like a huge adventure to many of these children. Upon arrival from Great Britain by ship, these children were then put on trains and sent to communities that had receiving and distribution homes. Children stayed in these homes until they were distributed out to families that had applied for them. A contract or indenture would be drawn up for a set number of ye...”

Mr. Richard Cannings (South Okanagan—West Kootenay, NDP)

November 22nd
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...hoods were taken from them. What if we had a real, formal apology from the Prime Minister, with the families invited to attend? Does the member think that would be an appropriate action?”

Hon. Judy A. Sgro (Humber River—Black Creek, Lib.)

November 22nd
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...Though each story we hear is different, whether of a male or female, the separation of so many families was predominant. We now know that the scheme regularly amounted to nothing short of a betrayal, such as when temporary dislocation for a child became permanent, when children were separated, and ultimately when families were tom apart.

More than 100,000 unaccompanied children made the journey to Canada in the hopes of a better life. Though it remains difficult to fathom the courage that the children must have had, today we can salute them for what they endured on our behalf, both as they grew in a strange new land, and later as they fought in the two world wars on our behalf.

As a former minister of immigration, I had the pleasure and challenge of overseeing the government department responsible not only for immigration, but also for refugees and citizenship. People from all over the world journey to our shores. It strikes me that the diverse stories of the British home children are as relevant today as they were then.

In a rapidly changing world, they remind us that we are all, in our own ways, newcomers. As such, we remained united by the Canadian promise of safety and prosperity, and mindful that the wealth of our country derives in part from the diversity and tenacity of the citizens, like the British home children who travelled from afar seeking home, a safe place to live, food every day, and most importantly, an opportunity to grow.

Today, we have a long overdue opportunity to acknowledge the critical role these children played in the early stage of Canada's development as a nation. We owe it to these children and their families to tell their stories. (1840)

When we look at the farm fields all across Canada, we...”

Mr. Richard Cannings (South Okanagan—West Kootenay, NDP)

November 22nd
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...ldren and their descendants.

Who were the British home children? They were children from poor families in the United Kingdom who were taken from their families, orphanages, and state workhouses, and sent to Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. Canada received the vast majority of these children. Those countries assisted with transportation and immigration costs, because these children were seen as a virtually free source of labour on newly developing farms and homesteads.

British parish priests were given the authority to take children into care as wards of the state if it was determined that the family was too poor to support them, a practice called philanthropic abductions. Poor parents, unwilling to give up their children, had little choice. Once taken from their families, children were essentially branded orphans, regardless of whether their parents survived or not. Although parents could occasionally visit their children in the orphanages, some were shocked to discover that what they had considered a temporary placement had become permanent, or worse, that they had been shipped overseas. Most of these parents would never see their children again.

This practice began in 1869, and continued in Canada until the last shipment of boys and girls arrived on Vancouver Island at the Prince of Wales Fairbridge Farm School, near Duncan, in 1948. During its heyday, single shipments of children sent by steamboat across the Atlantic could reach as many as 200 boys and girls, some as young as five, during the earlier phase of the program.

There were more than 100,000 boys and girls sent to Canada during this time, and Statistics Canada has estimated that about four million Canadians are descendants of these children, about one in eight Canadians. If this is a truly representative chamber, that means that more than 40 of us here in the House of Commons are descended from one of the home children.

The organizations that sent the children to Canada said they would have better lives, but in fact, they were required to sign indenture contracts as labourers, and were only allowed to leave service upon reaching legal age. Although the contract stipulated a modest income, most were never paid. The contracts typically required that children be given food, shelter, adequate clothing, as well as regular access to school and church.

Often, many of these basic provisions were not met, with children being made to sleep in barns or unheated attics, or to endure Canadian winters without proper winter clothing. Contracts were seldom enforced, as neither the charities nor governments involved had enough staff assigned to do this. Most home children never finished school, as they were required for work. Beatings for the boys and sexual abuse for the girls was not uncommon, and very few were adopted by their host families. “We were here to work”, one adult home child recalled.

British home children made up a substantial portion of volunteers in both world wars, up to 10,000 serving in World War I alone. (1850)

Art Joyce's grandfather, Cyril William Joyce, was sent to Canada in 1926 as a boy of 16. His father George was a travelling salesman, and the family lived in the east end of London, the epicentre of poverty in that city. Cyril spent several years working as an indentured farm labourer in northern Alberta until reaching legal age.

He never spoke of it much with his wife and children, and spoke even less of his family in England. His mother had signed the emigration papers, and he never spoke of her again. Cyril was unable to loosen the bonds on these painful memories, and took his family secrets to the grave. That shame, that unwillingness to speak of his past, is a common theme with British home children.

Descendants of home children are left with a huge hole in their lives, not knowing their family history, not knowing the true experiences of their parents and grandparents.

Despite the fact that our governments paid to bring 100,000 of these boys and girls here, then abandoned them to their fates on isolated farms, most Canadians know nothing about this dark chapter in our history.

Art Joyce points out that, “not once in all my years of public schooling did I learn about Canada's home children.” I can say the same thing. He felt compelled to research his grandfather's history, and the stories of other British home children in a book called Laying the Children's Ghosts to Rest: Canada's Home Children in the West.

What have other countries done to recognize the British Home Children? Australia's former Prime Minister Kevin Rudd invited British home children and their descendants to Parliament House in Canberra for a public apology on November 16, 2009. Many of those in the crowd were in tears.

On February 24, 2010, British Prime Minister Gordon Brown publicly apologized to the families of the approximately 130,000 children who were sent away from Britain.

For the elderly survivors and their descendants, numbering now into the millions in Canada, Australia, and New Zealand, it was a long-awaited moment, one some thought might never arrive.

As Art's uncle Rob Joyce wrote upon hearing of Brown's apology:

It is a great day, I wish we could be reading this with Dad now; that would have made it even better. I understand Dad better now than I ever did, and why he was sad at times for reasons I never knew. An understanding that, like the British Government’s apology, has come much too late.

On the subject of apologies, I would only add that while this House did issue a unanimous apology a few months ago, that apology was made unannounced. To my knowledge no one from the British home children community was present in the House to hear the member for Montcalm put forward his motion.

It would be very meaningful to these families if the government would issue a formal apology, given by the Prime Minister, with family members invited to be present, as we have done for so many other government apologies. The British home children who were taken from their families, lost their childhood to hard labour, and lived with the shame for the rest of their lives deserve no less.

Having a British home child day in Canada would be one more positive step on the road to healing those families. The day chosen, September 28, is coincidentally Art Joyce's birthday.”

Mr. Mark Strahl (Chilliwack—Hope, CPC)

November 22nd
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...ndividuals who were shipped from Great Britain to Canada between 1869 and 1948, and torn from their families to serve mainly as cheap labour once they arrived in Canada.

Today, in honour of my g...”

Mr. Nick Whalen (St. John's East, Lib.)

November 22nd
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...mmigration has mainly been a positive force. It has helped make Canada more prosperous and diverse. Families have been reunited, and protection has been offered to generations of people from around th...”

Ms. Rachael Harder (Lethbridge, CPC)

November 22nd
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“... way.

For some of them, they had a very positive experience. They were taken into homes, into families on farms, and were given a positive experience or encounter with Canadian society. They wer...”

Hon. Michelle Rempel (Calgary Nose Hill, CPC)

November 22nd
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“... military who have fought to contain this threat. This can be the only response to people and their families who have faced U-Haul vans, suicide bombs, a shooting in their place of work and of their f...”

Mr. Gordon Brown (Leeds—Grenville—Thousand Islands and Rideau Lakes, CPC)

November 21st
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“... courtesy of the Carolyn Sifton Foundation, and provides school supplies, clothing, and support for families at Christmas.

Volunteers, who are always needed, are the backbone of the agency, and ...”

Mr. Bruce Stanton (Simcoe North, CPC)

November 21st
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...l memories and hockey moments.

To his children Denise, Pierre Junior, Renée, David, and their families, I extend our deepest sympathies and pay tribute their dad and papa, Pierre Pilote.”

Mr. Alexander Nuttall (Barrie—Springwater—Oro-Medonte, CPC)

November 21st
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...Hindu Canadians have also helped build our country into the greatest place to live, work, and raise families.

On behalf of the people of Barrie—Springwater—Oro-Medonte, I would like to thank and...”

Hon. Andrew Scheer (Leader of the Opposition, CPC)

November 21st
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...is the one who is causing so much confusion and raising taxes for small businesses and middle-class families.

Why then, when Canadians are looking for answers, does the Prime Minister respond wi...”

Hon. Jean-Yves Duclos (Minister of Families, Children and Social Development, Lib.)

November 21st
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...league on her question.

I wish to remind my colleague that our government takes poverty among families and children very seriously. I would like to remind her that, across Canada, the families of six million children are currently receiving a Canada child benefit that is better and w...”

Hon. Harjit S. Sajjan (Minister of National Defence, Lib.)

November 21st
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ence policy, our government is committed to providing unprecedented support to our people and their families. This government is committed to ensuring that our military members receive their fair comp...”

Mr. Jean-Claude Poissant (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food, Lib.)

November 21st
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ways been very clear and have said all along that we will continue to support our farmers and their families, as well as Canada's agricultural interests.

My hon. colleagues opposite should speak...”

Hon. Kevin Sorenson (Battle River—Crowfoot, CPC)

November 21st
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...distribute marijuana as long as he or she has less than five grams.

I have already heard from families with children who have been using marijuana and now have developed schizophrenia. They are ...”

Ms. Cheryl Hardcastle (Windsor—Tecumseh, NDP)

November 20th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...t can cost more than $40,000 a year to care for a child with a severe disability, yet some of these families have a total income of barely that much, which brings me back to my earlier point.

Some persons living with disabilities find themselves having to hire lawyers to assist them in navigating the complex web of programs available to them from the various levels of government. To me, this is just unacceptable. I see this bill as starting new momentum. When doctors undertake due diligence in completing evaluations on behalf of their patients so they can receive modest assistance, does it not make sense that this form be acceptable to apply to all programs available to the patient, instead of their having to start over again each time? We have to be smarter.

I am confident that as Canadians, we really do not want to force this vulnerable population into spending the scarce resources at their disposal to access programs that exist to provide them with assistance that is, rightfully, there for them.

I would now like to quote one of my constituents, Debra Sandre, who was able to provide me with a very candid overview of her lived experience.

She said, “I was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis in February of 2014 at the age of 30. Getting a diagnosis like that is hard, stressful, scary and many other adjectives, especially at this age.

“When trying to work out treatment, doctor's visits with specialists and all the other things to adjust to the new reality of living with a permanent disability it can be very difficult to figure out what resources may be available to you. Once you figure out what services and government assistance you may be entitled to, you then have to apply or prove your disability over and over again. And while proving this over and over you also have to incur the cost of having your doctor fill out the paperwork. This process can and should be easier for people who need the services, and we definitely do not need the added stress of applying for them.”

I really appreciate Debra allowing me to quote her here. I have to say that I could not agree with her more.

When a person attempts to access a benefit for the first time, the quality of that experience, whether it be onerous, overly complicated, or easy and efficient, defines the government for them. As far as they are concerned, it is the government, because these services are the interface between the service provider and the person assessing them. Therefore, those of us in government really need to think about the nature of that experience. We need to always be cognizant of how the delivery of these services is experienced by the people who need them.

Fortunately, for our purposes here today, the improvement of the quality of government services delivery falls within the mandates of two ministers in charge of such things.

In the mandate letter for the Minister of Families, Children and Social Development, we find this:

Work with the Minister of Public Services and Procurement to set transparent service standards so that Canadians get timely access to the benefits to which they are entitled.

In the mandate letter for the Minister of Public Services and Procurement, it says:

Work with the President of the Treasury Board and the Minister of Families, Children and Social Development, who is responsible for Service Canada, to establish new performance standards and set up a mechanism to conduct rigorous assessments of the performance of key government services and report findings publicly.

Bill C-348 deals with what many would call the low-hanging fruit, the first and simplest issues to be dealt with by a government interested in improving the way it delivers important services to its citizens. This bill has the potential to set a new course in how we manage our bureaucracy in a manner that would be a sensible way to make a difference in people's lives.

I am well aware that private member's bills rarely make it into law, which is why I am determined to propose something modest and achievable.

This bears reiterating: currently, people must apply separately to each program and have to endure the ordeal of proving their disabilities each time. Bill C-348 would create a once-stop shop, so to speak, a streamlined approach that would allow individuals to apply for all federal programs at once: the Canada pension plan disability benefit; the disability tax credit; the registered disability savings plan; veterans disability pensions, where applicable, of course; and the opportunities fund. All operate as stand-alone programs with distinct and separate application processes. (1110)

This really makes it cumbersome for people living with disabilities to access the federal supports they may be entitled to. We want to try to fix this problem, to the extent we are able, while operating within the constraints of private members' legislation.

Members will note that incorporated in this bill is its own internal review mechanism, which is in keeping with the mandate letters I quoted from earlier. Here is what the bill stipulates in proposed subsection 8.1(1):

Within 18 months after the day on which this section comes into force and every two years after that, the Minister shall undertake a review of the effectiveness of the application process provided for under paragraph 8(2)(b) and prepare a report setting out his or her findings and recommendations.

We all want to make sure that legislation actually works. In this case, we want to know that it genuinely makes the application process simpler for persons living with disabilities. We need to analyze its strengths and challenges and seize the opportunities and synergies that would become apparent when applying this practical directive. This would allow for the valuable input of our public service, which has the expertise and insight to respond to this directive.

Those following this issue will know that having in place a monitoring mechanism to ensure that the government's accessibility legislation was being implemented as to its intended capabilities was a major part of what Canadians told the government during its consultations over this past year.

I envision a time when we will have more streamlined access and coordination with provinces so that when a person is deemed eligible for one disability program, it opens access to another: gateways, not hurdles; bridges, not silos. Our real job here in this place is to continually move forward to remove the barriers to participation in a quality life. This would be the first step in a real opportunity to set the tone, the new approach, that would be a springboard for further discussion and action at all levels of government.

The internal review would ensure that we engage meaningfully to maximize our resources and enrich the Canadian experience in this modest way. I am sure now that those listening are contemplating the potential reach of this type of bureaucratic direction and what implications this could very well have. I certainly welcome the gained momentum that persons living with disabilities, and their families, are eagerly awaiting from this government.

As I have already mentioned, this is the ...”

Mr. Robert Kitchen (Souris—Moose Mountain, CPC)

November 20th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...nt I would like to raise. It is not just disabled persons who deal with this issue, but often their families as well. Many times caretakers come from the family of a disabled person, and many times they are not talked about or given recognition. (1135)

Being a caretaker is not an easy job, and I commend all those who undertake the role. The bill would make it easier for caregivers and families to ensure they would be taking advantage of all programs available to them without having to comb through various websites to find that information. It would avoid hours of searching, determining if a service or program would be applicable, disseminating this to their family member, and then completing the multitude of applications.

Furthermore, Bill C-348 would provide for a single, comprehensive application that would access all programs across the federal government for persons with disabilities. This seems so logical that I am surprised it has not yet been done.

While I understand these programs involve a number of government departments, centralizing the application process through the Department of Employment and Social Development would be a huge benefit to persons with disabilities and their families. It would save much time, effort, and frustration. It is also a real and achievable goal. I...”

Mr. Matthew Dubé (Beloeil—Chambly, NDP)

November 20th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... at the very least, things have started to move, although not quickly enough for the needs of these families who pay the price in dignity and travel logistics every time they attempt to travel.[Transl...”

Mr. James Bezan (Selkirk—Interlake—Eastman, CPC)

November 20th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...n being incarcerated, will have the opportunity to return to their communities and radicalize their families, their friends, and the people they interact with. That is completely unacceptable. That ju...”

Mr. Majid Jowhari (Richmond Hill, Lib.)

November 20th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...onstituents are Canadians from an immigrant background. Of these, the majority are youths and young families under the age of 30. For this reason, I am proud to say that through this set of amendments, our government is taking action to ensure that all youth involved in the criminal justice system are afforded the enhanced protections provided by Canada's Youth Criminal Justice Act, while also holding them accountable for their actions.

The Youth Criminal Justice Act, or YCJA, is the federal law that governs Canada's youth aged 12 to 17 who commit criminal offences, including terrorism offences. The YCJA recognizes that the youth justice system should be separate from the adult system, and based on the principle of diminished moral blameworthiness of youth. It emphasizes rehabilitation and reintegration, just and proportionate responses to offending, and enhanced procedural protections for youth. The act also recognizes the importance of involving families, victims, and communities in the youth criminal justice system. The YCJA contains a number ...”

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith (Beaches—East York, Lib.)

November 20th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...rk and 224 return to school. The organization has also sponsored and supported three Syrian refugee families.

Recently, our government has committed over $1 million in funding over 29 months to ...”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

November 20th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...s for Canadians. Canadians have a higher level of confidence because they have more money for their families. We will continue to work for Canadians because that is what we were elected to do.”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

November 20th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... of unemployment to the lowest it has been since the great recession so that Canadians and Canadian families can actually do well and see the fruits of the advantages for them and their families.”

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, CPC)

November 20th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...t appropriate support is needed to disengage and reintegrate foreign terrorist travellers and their families. Unbelievable.

Does the minister realize that it is his job to keep Canadians safe an...”

Ms. Emmanuella Lambropoulos (Saint-Laurent, Lib.)

November 20th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...nity to work with young people in my riding, Saint-Laurent, and build good relationships with their families.

Today being National Child Day, would the Minister of Families, Children and Social Development tell us about our government's new initiatives to help children and families?”

Mr. Gérard Deltell (Louis-Saint-Laurent, CPC)

November 20th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“.... Speaker, FM93 and QMI Agency reported last week that the former chief of staff to the Minister of Families, Children and Social Development now works for CN, which is a clear conflict of interest. Why? Because we know the Canadian government and CN are currently in a dispute.

The Minister of Families, Children and Social Development says he is not dealing with the Quebec Bridge because he is the minister of families. Wait a second, though—the Minister of Families, Children and Social Development has commented on this file 19 times. More to the point, his own news release says that he hosted a work meeting about the Quebec Bridge with stakeholders on August 31, 2016.

Can the Minister of Families, Children and Social Development tell us whether—”

Mr. Colin Fraser (West Nova, Lib.)

November 20th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...k diligently to make the world a safer, more peaceful, and more prosperous place for them and their families.

This past weekend, the Minister of National Defence wrapped up the ninth annual Hali...”

Hon. Erin O'Toole (Durham, CPC)

November 20th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...e plane, let alone beside their parent. Not only is that incredibly unfair to thousands of Canadian families, it is a sign that our security measures are flawed. When will the minister commit to a red...”

Mr. Gérard Deltell

November 20th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, in answer to the question I asked earlier about the Minister of Families, Children and Social Development's conflict of interest, the minister said that he carefull...”

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC)

November 20th
Hansard Link

Routine Proceedings

“...ome of the benefits, only adding to the grief and stress.

On behalf of the Cormiers and other families in my constituency, such as Greg and Jaime Sawchuk who lost their son Vaughn, and thousands of other Canadian families that have lost an infant child, I table the petition calling upon Parliament to look for wa...”

Ms. Irene Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe, NDP)

November 9th
Hansard Link

Routine Proceedings

“...t. There were 4,000 Canadian soldiers killed and almost 12,000 wounded. Canadian soldiers and their families paid a horrendous price for a battle that was later known for this senseless slaughter. All four divisions of the Canadian Corps took turns in the assault on the ridge. One battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry, lost most of its junior officers in the first hour of the assault on October 30.

This year we also mark the 100th anniversary of Vimy Ridge. Approximately, 100,000 Canadian soldiers participated in the battle, fighting valiantly to capture the ridge, marking a strategic turning point for the allies in the war. The success of the assault is attributable to the careful preparation by the Canadians and the use of the creeping barrage. The precise and timely use of aimed shellfire forced the Germans to take cover while 15,000 Canadian troops followed behind the barrage and eventually overran and captured enemy positions before the German troops were able to react. The price was heavy: 3,600 Canadians lost their lives, and 7,000 were injured.

In August 1942, 75 years ago, almost 5,000 Canadian soldiers took part in the daring pre-dawn landing at Dieppe, Puys, and Pourville. The raid resulted in heavy losses. More than 900 Canadians lost their lives, and nearly 2,000 were taken prisoner. This summer, Canadians had the honour to be in Dieppe, along with the minister, the staff of Veterans Affairs, and four Canadian veterans who landed on that beach 75 years ago. The people of Dieppe, Pourville, Puys, and France have not forgotten the sacrifice of Canadians all those years ago. Our veterans marched proudly along the town promenade to the applause and tears of the people who remain so grateful to them. I was taken by the fact that there was a young French soldier, armed and in his fatigues, who looked to be about 21, who wept openly when our veterans passed.

These battles left scars on the soldiers, families, and communities, scars that never healed and should never be forgotten.

We should also remember the people on the home front who made incredible and important contributions to the war effort and in support of Canadian troops and personnel. Sadly, many are unknown to us, like the women in Stratford, Ontario, who worked in the rail yard repairing the locomotives and railcars that took the supplies to the troops at the front during World War II. Most are remembered only in a photograph taken while they laboured for the war effort.

Men and women continue to serve this country, and we would be remiss if we failed to recognize their contributions, their bravery and valour. They include those who served in the Korean War, during the Cold War, in peacekeeping missions around the world, and in the war in Afghanistan and those who serve here at home.

We must also recognize those who have served this country with honour, despite facing unique challenges to that service, including those from the LGBT community, indigenous people, and individuals who have experienced military sexual trauma. We honour their service and their dedication to Canada. (1025)

Of course there are the families of serving members and veterans that welcome home family members forever scarred, and they support, advocate and care for their loved ones.

On November 11, I invite all members of the House, as well as all Canadians, to honour the valour, devotion, and loyalty of the men and women who have served Canada. They deserve our ongoing support and gratitude, and to be treated with the greatest respect.

It is essential that this week's reflections translate to concrete actions for tomorrow. The transition to civilian life can be difficult and can come with great and many challenges. The road to healing is not a seamless one. Thus, we must listen to our veterans and their families to ensure they receive the support, help, and recognition they need and deserve.

We m...”

Mr. Michel Boudrias (Terrebonne, BQ)

November 9th
Hansard Link

Routine Proceedings

“...est of their days.

“Duty” is also a word that will always carry profound significance for the families and descendants of our fallen soldiers. Those people have paid the ultimate price so that o...”

Mr. Kevin Waugh (Saskatoon—Grasswood, CPC)

November 9th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ey want to be educated, and most of all they want a sustainable future for themselves and for their families based on their own vision and their own priorities.”

Mr. Bob Saroya (Markham—Unionville, CPC)

November 9th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... for this.

As it stands, the proposed legislation is not what is best for Canadians. Canadian families expect safe and healthy communities in which to raise their children. Elected representativ...”

Ms. Yvonne Jones (Labrador, Lib.)

November 9th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...we remember him. We remember all our veterans. We continue to feel their loss, and we support their families throughout our country.”

Mr. Greg Fergus (Hull—Aylmer, Lib.)

November 9th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...an organization that specializes in research, awareness, information, and support for men and their families.

As hon. members know, I am a proud supporter of Bow Tie Thursdays. That is why I am ...”

Mrs. Karen McCrimmon (Kanata—Carleton, Lib.)

November 9th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...nparalleled bravery and selflessness.

To all those who have sacrificed so much, including the families who supported them, I say, and all of us say, “Thank you”.

Canada is so very proud an...”

Mr. Alain Rayes (Richmond—Arthabaska, CPC)

November 9th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ave a sense of the additional pressure that this government is inflicting on our soldiers and their families, these Canadians who make the ultimate sacrifice for their country?”

Hon. Kent Hehr (Minister of Sport and Persons with Disabilities, Lib.)

November 9th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...aker, our government is fully committed to our Canadian Armed Forces members and veterans and their families. We continue to build upon the supports we have in our mandate letter, including reopening offices, investments in front-line staff, delivering on financial security, improving supports for mental health. I will let the member know that we are investing in a centre of excellence for mental health for our veterans and their families to get the help that they need. We are standing by our veterans and their families, unlike the Conservatives, who ignored them in the 10 years that they were in office.”

Mrs. Cathay Wagantall (Yorkton—Melville, CPC)

November 8th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...l be laid to commemorate Canada's fallen. As Canadians, we can never thank these soldiers and their families enough.

God bless the families of our fallen, God bless our servicemen and women, God bless Canada.”

Mr. Fayçal El-Khoury (Laval—Les Îles, Lib.)

November 8th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...of their own. Even though time has passed, on this Remembrance Day, our thoughts are still with the families who are grieving. Our soldiers and other Canadians continue to fulfill their duty to protec...”

Hon. Diane Lebouthillier (Minister of National Revenue, Lib.)

November 8th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ing our government has done in the past two years. We created the Canada child benefit for Canadian families who need support. We gave more money to our families. We worked with low-income workers to help them keep a larger portion of their hard-earned ...”

Hon. Diane Lebouthillier (Minister of National Revenue, Lib.)

November 8th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...hings our government has done over the past two years. We enhanced the Canada child benefit for the families that needed it most. We lowered taxes on the middle class. We are working to lower small bu...”

Hon. Diane Lebouthillier (Minister of National Revenue, Lib.)

November 8th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...rnment's record is far more solid than that of the previous Conservative government.

Canadian families in need are receiving the Canada child benefit, which is actually helping families. Low-income workers will get to keep more of their hard-earned money because we have increa...”

Hon. Diane Lebouthillier (Minister of National Revenue, Lib.)

November 8th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ur government has always taken a compassionate approach and helped those in need. We are supporting families in need through the Canada child benefit. That is what we are doing.”

Hon. Kevin Sorenson (Battle River—Crowfoot, CPC)

November 8th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...g and has okayed it.

Why are the Liberals going after disabled Canadians and the middle-class families that look after them? When is this foolishness going to stop?”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

November 8th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...nced over the last year is the best growth in a decade and is making a real difference for Canadian families. They are doing better and putting more money into the economy, and we are all better.”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

November 8th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... new jobs have been created in our country. That is very important for our economy and for Canadian families. Our economy is humming along. This is all very good news.”

Mr. Marc Miller (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Infrastructure and Communities, Lib.)

November 8th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...rate our belief in this every day through the services and support we deliver to veterans and their families. We remain committed to a pension for life option, and will announce further details later ...”

Ms. Anne Minh-Thu Quach (Salaberry—Suroît, NDP)

November 8th
Hansard Link

Routine Proceedings

“...nt two petitions. The first one has to do with affordable housing in Canada.

Over 1.6 million families do not have access to affordable housing and are spending more than 30% of their income on ...”

Ms. Julie Dzerowicz (Davenport, Lib.)

November 8th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...o I am blessed to serve and who always inspire me with their passion for life, their love for their families, their love of community, and their desire to do their part to make our community, our country, and our world a better place.

In talking about the budget implementation bill, I would like to focus on what our budget this year does for women, for seniors, and, if I have time, for workers.

On women, our budget this year produced the first-ever budget gender statement, an assessment of how gender was considered in budget 2017 measures. For me this is vital to do, because I believe it is important to be transparent on how budgetary measures and spending are impacting women. This budget gender statement will not be a panacea for gender equity, but it will help the Canadian government assess and target how we can best allocate our resources so that both our men and women are supported equally. It is a long time coming, as there are many other countries that have already done this, but I am so glad we are doing it now and that we have committed to doing this on an ongoing basis.

One of the biggest stresses for Davenport parents continues to be the high cost of day care. Therefore, I was pleased to see that over $7 billion over a 10-year period was committed in budget 2017 to support and create more high-quality, affordable child care spaces across Canada. I know that our Minister of Families, Children and Social Development has worked hard with all the provinces to create a framework to foster fully inclusive early education and child care services across the country while respecting the needs and circumstances of each jurisdiction. Under the agreement, the federal government will send billions of dollars to the provinces and territories to focus on creating new child care spaces for families. Our plan is anticipated to create up to 40,000 new, affordable, accessible spaces across Canada over the next few years.

This is a good beginning. Indeed, this is a great beginning, and I think we need to go further and do more. Until we close the gap in women's participation in the workforce, until we ensure that every single family in Canada has access to affordable child care in this country, we have not finished our job.

There is currently a 10 percentage point gap between the labour force participation rates of men and women in Canada. According to the International Monetary Fund and a large body of research from a number of places around the world, the more women who enter the workforce, the more productive its economy will be. The best way to boost women's participation rates is to ensure not only affordable day care but also maximum flexibility for women in the workforce.

At this point, too many families in my riding still have to make a choice between either having one spouse at home to take care of the kids or having both parents work to earn enough to cover the high cost of day care in downtown Toronto, where the monthly costs are around $1,200 per month. Therefore, while we have made enormous, laudable progress, our work is not yet done.

One of the key areas I am very proud of that does support families and is helping with some of the costs of day care is our Canada child benefit. This is a huge benefit for working middle-class families in Davenport. I asked for the numbers to date with respect to the amount of money going to Davenport families, and what I received was this: from July 2016 to June 2017, there were a total of 9,210 payments, with an average payment of $5,880 for the year. The total amount that went to Davenport families over that one-year period was $54,164,000. That is an enormous amount. I know that Davenport families are very happy to have received this. I know that it goes a long way to support them, to support their lives, and to support their families.

I also should note that in the recent fall economic statement, which was released on October 24, the government announced that it would strengthen the Canada child benefit by indexing it to an annual increase in the cost of living, effective July 2018, which is two years earlier than planned. This will put more money in the pockets of Canadians immediately to help with the ever-increasing cost of living.

There is great progress and support for both women and families in our budget this year. (1545)

Now I want to move on to seniors. In the cold air of...”

Hon. Judy A. Sgro (Humber River—Black Creek, Lib.)

November 8th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...tion some of their stories.

Two weeks ago, I had the pleasure of hosting the hon. Minister of Families, Children and Social Development in my riding of Humber River—Black Creek, and as we walked through Yorkgate Mall, we encountered a constituent who was expecting her first child. The hon. minister and I took this opportunity to explain the financial opportunities this new mother stood to gain from our government's new Canada child benefit. This constituent, about to be a new mother for the first time, was overjoyed with a sense of relief to know that there would be financial help from the government and she thanked us for making a difference in her life and the life of her baby.

It would be a good idea to dig even deeper into the numbers on how the Canada child benefit is helping ridings like mine and many others throughout Canada. As of July 2017, there were a total of 12,250 payments provided in the riding of Humber River—Black Creek, which directly impact more than 20,000 children, who are so much better off as a result of the Canada child benefit. Their moms have extra money to be able to invest in everything from winter clothes to assisting with dancing or piano lessons, things they certainly could not do before. With some families, that money is putting more food on the table.

The average payment to a family is $770, and families in my riding have already received a total of almost $10 million dollars. That is $10 million dollars more that has gone into the riding of Humber River—Black Creek to help the single moms, the families, the children to have a better quality of life. That is all part of the budget implementation act. It is making a difference in their lives in that one riding. Repeat that throughout our country and think how much better off so many families and children are. These numbers cannot be ignored and do make a significant difference.

It is stories like these that allow me to rise today and speak confidently that the bill would help make a positive difference for Canadian families. The investments our government has made in people, in our communities, and in our economy are working. Canada has the fastest growing economy in the G7 and we are reinvesting the benefits of that growth back to the people who contribute most to that success.

Because of Canada's strong economic growth, our government's bottom line is better and we can, as a result, do even more to help the middle class and those working hard to join it. With lower taxes on small business, more support through the Canada child benefit, and an enhanced working income tax benefit, it will be an enormous help.

One of the things I have often heard from some of the parents or families who come into my office is that if they go to work, they will be worse off because everything they make will get clawed back. The working income tax benefit will help those families so they can go out and get a second job and not be penalized for it. (1600)

When the Canada child benefit was first introduced in July 2016, the extra money in parents' pockets had an immediate effect on consumer confidence and economic growth. Canada, as I said, has the fastest growing economy in the G7, giving our government the flexibility to reinvest a lot of these benefits.

With the increased cost of living increases to the CCB starting in July 2018, two years ahead of schedule, for a single parent with two children making $35,000—and I have a lot of them in my riding of Humber River—Black Creek—the strengthened CCB will mean $560 more next year, tax free, for books, skating lessons, or warm clothes for winter. The added confidence these increases bring to families is proven to have an immediate impact on economic growth.

Because the economy is growing so well, we are allowing low-income workers, including families without children and a growing number of single Canadians, to keep more hard-earned money f...”

Hon. Judy A. Sgro

November 8th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...rangements. We just have to recognize that we are in the 21st century. Many women are working, many families experience pain and difficulty together and need to find ways for their employers to give t...”

Mr. Dean Allison (Niagara West, CPC)

November 8th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...o do in stimulating the country, such as universal child benefit and other that obviously will make families better off. We do not have a problem with that. The challenge we have is the instability of...”

Mr. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.)

November 8th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...eading the G7, and we have created more than 500,000 jobs since it was introduced. There are 12,000 families or 24,000 kids in my riding who receive a total of $8 million per month tax-free. This is an enormous boost to the Guelph economy. The budget implementation act will now index these funds two years ahead of schedule due to the strong growth we have in our economy.

Economic opportunity is the best way to address income inequality. This legislation will take the next steps for our innovation and skills plan, an agenda that focuses on people and addresses the changing nature of the economy to ensure that it works for all Canadians. Bill C-63 will enact several key parts of our plan, including $600 million in new financing for clean technology firms, and $400 million to put in place the venture capital catalyst initiative.

The second point that the poverty elimination task force is looking at is affordable housing, with the goal that everyone in Guelph and Wellington can find and maintain an appropriate, safe, and affordable place to call home. The government will invest more than $11.2 billion over 11 years through the national housing strategy to provide low-income Canadians with improved access to adequate and affordable housing. This is the most significant investment in housing that has ever been made in the history of Canada.

Through the rental construction financing initiative, the government will also offer more than $2.5 billion over the next four years in low-cost loans to support the construction of new rental housing to help increase the supply of rental housing. Budget 2017 also proposes a total investment of $2.1 billion over the next 11 years to expand and extend funding for the homelessness partnering strategy beyond 2018-19. Our national housing strategy will be announced over the next few weeks. We will be meeting with members of the Guelph and Wellington poverty elimination task force to discuss implications for Guelph and how we can work together.

The third point is food insecurity. Everyone has to have access to affordable and healthy food in a dignified manner. We have a shared objective federally. In fact, the agriculture committee that I sit on has repeatedly heard from witnesses on the food policy, addressing the nutritional food that Canada needs to focus on, and working with partners like food banks to reduce food waste and to improve food distribution within our communities. (1630)

The Canada child benefit has been mentioned a lot today. It has helped lift 300,000 children out of poverty. Thanks to this benefit, by the end of this year, it is estimated that child poverty will be reduced by 40% from where it was in 2013.

For a single parent with two children and $35,000 of income, the acceleration of the Canada child benefit will contribute $560 toward the increasing cost of feeding children. This increase means more nutritious food for lower-income children and families, allowing for a more engaged and active student population in our schools.

To address...”

Ms. Linda Duncan (Edmonton Strathcona, NDP)

November 8th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...er, I would like to thank my colleague for her very thorough listing of measures for which ordinary families are waiting.

It appears the government feels it has a lot of money to spend. It is going to send hundreds of millions of dollars over to China to develop infrastructure around the world, and yet, it cannot seem to find the time, the money, or the heart, to provide pharmacare.

The Liberals say we are all in this together, and yet, they vote against every single private member's bill and motion we table. That includes calls for the right to affordable housing, and the right to affordable medicines, so people do not have to decide whether they are going to pay their rent or buy their medicine.

Could the member speak to the fact there are many working families, and many people trying to get into the middle class who are not benefiting yet from the go...”

Mr. Matt DeCourcey (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs, Lib.)

November 8th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ment this funding will build a high quality early learning and child care system that New Brunswick families can rely on.

While I am on the subject of supporting families, let me remind the House that Fredericton welcomed more than 500 Syrian refugees, more per capita than any city in Canada.

With an aging population, one-third of which is expected to be over the age of 65 by the 2030s, support for New Brunswick seniors is essential.

During our first year in government, we restored the eligibility age for old age security and the guaranteed income supplement back to 65. We increased the GIS top-up benefit for single seniors by up to $947 per year. We enhanced the Canada pension plan as well.

Budget 2017 further ensures that seniors continue to receive the support they deserve by committing $125.1 million to improve home care for seniors in New Brunswick.

Over the next 11 years, we will invest $3.2 billion to support affordable housing priorities, including initiatives to support safe and independent living for seniors.[Translation]

Over these 11 years, we will invest an additional $5 billion to establish a national housing fund to help seniors and the most vulnerable. (1700) [English]

New Brunswick is the ideal place to rollout bold and transformative approaches that will enable healthy aging. The federal government's $16.6 million investment in the University of New Brunswick's Centre for Healthy Living is an excellent example.

AGE-WELL, Canada's technology and aging network, recently partnered with the New Brunswick Health Research Foundation and Fredericton's York Care Centre to open a new national innovation hub in Fredericton.[Translation]

AGE-WELL is a network of federally funded centres of excellence that advance innovation in the field of technology and aging in the interest of all Canadians.[English]

The federal government's first health care deal will enable seniors to live longer, healthier lives in their own homes, and reduce financial and administrative burdens on our already over-stretched health care system

As chair of the Atlantic growth strategy subcommittee on innovation, I can assure the House that the federal government is committed to empowering Atlantic Canadian entrepreneurs through innovation. Under the Atlantic growth strategy, the government is taking bold action to create more middle-class jobs, strengthen local communities, and grow the economy. The AGS will enhance and enrich Atlantic Canada's innovation ecosystem.[Translation]

Recently designated community of the year for startups in Canada, Fredericton has built a well-earned reputation as an entrepreneurial hub and a centre of innovation.

Thanks in part to the University of New Brunswick's essential role, the innovation ecosystem of this city is attracting a larger number of creative entrepreneurs.[English]

In our 150th year of Confederation, as we prepare to once again take on a more active and dynamic role in the world, we are committed to the vision of Canada's new defence policy. To meet this commitment, the federal government is investing in an agile, multi-purpose, combat ready military, operated by highly trained and well-equipped women and men.

Over the next 10 years, defence spending will increase by more than 70%, which means that 5th Canadian Division Support Base Gagetown, Canada's second-largest military base and home of Canada's army, will take on an even bigger role as an economic generator in our local economy.

Earlier this year, I took part in a ribbon cutting ceremony for a new tactical armed patrol vehicle facility, a $26 million investment by this federal government. When we add this $26 million investment to the $38 million investment in critical infrastructure upgrades at Base Gagetown last year, we get a clear picture of just how big an economic generator Base Gagetown is to the Fredericton region and to all of New Brunswick.[Translation]

This investment in infrastructure is certainly important, but the federal government's investment in the Canadian Armed Forces is even more important.[English]

For example, since January 1, all troops deployed on international operations have been exempt from federal income tax on their CAF salary up to a pay level of lieutenant colonel. This is in addition to existing allowances that compensate for hardship and risk. Other investments include $198.2 million over the next 10 years to implement a new total health and wellness strategy, providing a greater range of health and wellness services and programs.

There is also an increase of $6 million per year to modernize family support programs, such as military family resource centres, and a new 1,200-person Canadian Armed Forces transition group that would help CAF members and their families transition back into CAF following illness or injury, or into civilian life at the conclusion of their military service.

Budget 2017 would continue to improve the lives of veterans by focusing on three important themes: ensuring the financial security for ill and injured veterans, investing in education and career development to help veterans transition into post-military life, and supporting families.

In the 150th anniversary of Canada's Confederation and with Remembrance Day just a f...”

Mr. Alain Rayes (Richmond—Arthabaska, CPC)

November 8th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...rnment should get its own house in order. A Fraser Institute report showed that 81% of middle-class families have been paying more tax during the Liberals' two years in office than they were paying under the former Conservative government at the end of its term in office. On average, each family is paying $840 more per year.

The Liberals answer by telling us not to worry, because the economy is growing. We know that the economy is growing right now despite the Liberals, not because of them. The measures being taken by the Liberal government now will not really have an effect until a few years from now, and the positive growth we are seeing is a direct result of our Conservative measures taken by the previous Canadian government.

The Minister of Finance also confirmed that the Liberals will borrow $20 billion this year to pay for their spending spree. This is on top of the $25 billion they borrowed in the first year of this government's mandate. They answer by telling us again not to worry and that the budget will magically balance itself, but no one knows when. The truth is that by announcing a $20 billion deficit again this year, the Liberals are breaking another election promise they had made, which was to not exceed a $10 billion deficit in the first two years, and that is already a huge amount, all things considered. Now it is going to be double that for each year.

That is not all. The government broke a second promise because the Prime Minister promised to balance the budget by 2019. Now, we have learned that he has no plan to ever balance the budget. If I understand the Liberals' message correctly, that means that the Minister of Finance is racking up debt twice as quickly as planned and that the deficit will continue to steadily grow for several more years. There is no escaping it. Someone will have to pay the bill at one point or another. That someone will be our children and grandchildren and all middle-class Canadians.

By way of evidence, first, the Liberals eliminated the universal child care benefit. Then, they did away with the children's fitness tax credit and the children's arts tax credit. They also eliminated the post-secondary education and textbook tax credit, not to mention the fact that they did away with income splitting as soon as they took office. That is not all. Next, they cancelled plans to reduce the small business tax rate and employment insurance contributions, while increasing payroll taxes and creating a new carbon tax.

That is still not all. We must not forget that the Liberals eliminated income splitting; halved the TFSA contribution limit; scrapped the public transit tax credit, even though they claim to be a green government; introduced an Uber tax; and raised taxes on beer, wine, and spirits. Finally they tried to impose a tax on health and dental benefits and even on employee discounts for retail and restaurant workers, who need a bite to eat and are trying to save a few dollars on each meal at the end of their shift. Now that is really meanspirited.

The Liberal government's strategy involves trying to smother the flames of its out-of-control spending by asking the middle class to come to the rescue. (1715)

The problem with this Liberal government is that it seems to be completely out of touch with Canadians. It seems to belong to a different class, the small percentage of wealthy people. This leads it to make decisions that make no sense to most Canadians who are living from paycheque to paycheque. When these Canadians found out that the Prime Minister and his family spent their vacation on a private island at the enormous cost of $215,000 and that taxpayers would have to foot the bill, no one could understand it. How can the Prime Minister believe that he acted responsibly? How could he have made that decision without seeing that it was problematic, contradictory, and hypocritical? How can he be concerned about the growing tax burden on Canadian families when the measures that have been put in place do not affect his family fortune?

Maybe the Liberal government needs to be reminded that the interest on the debt exceeds $15 billion per year. I am not talking about the deficit; I am talking about the interest on the debt. Those billions are gone and will never be invested. Increasing the deficit by $50 billion will not help us deal with the debt, which has grown that much in just two years. The $15 billion annual interest on the debt could pay for three tunnels between Quebec City and Lévis, three Champlain bridges, or 187,500 kilometres of repaired roads, which is the equivalent of 12 trips across Canada and back from coast to coast. It could pay for 40 huge multi-purpose arenas, four major hydroelectric dams, 500,000 daycare spaces, 11,500 affordable housing units, 2,500 MRI machines in hospitals, 75 F-18 fighter jets, 1,625 water treatment plants on reserves, or 300 rail bypasses for places like Lac-Mégantic. As an aside, we are still waiting for the results of that study.

The Liberals will reply that they created the Canada child benefit, but that benefit, which gives families a maximum of $560, is a smoke screen. Indeed, for every $560 a family receives, it will hav...”

Mr. Alain Rayes

November 8th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...er went to a private island to spend taxpayer money. This government cancelled income splitting for families, which allowed them to save on taxes. This government is irresponsibly putting our families, children, and grandchildren in debt, without any plan to return to a balanced budget.

<...”

Mr. Mark Warawa (Langley—Aldergrove, CPC)

November 7th
Hansard Link

Routine Proceedings

“...m honoured to present two petitions today.

The first is a petition from an association called Families For Justice. It is a group of Canadians who have lost a loved one killed by an impaired dri...”

Ms. Kamal Khera (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Revenue, Lib.)

November 7th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... knocked on doors we listened to Canadians, how they were struggling to find jobs and pay for their families, or working extremely hard to make ends meet. We listened to them and we invested in Canadians, in our communities, and in our country.

That is why the first thing we did as a government was to lower taxes for the middle class and raised them for the wealthiest 1%.

We introduced the Canada child benefit that helped nine out of 10 families and lifted over 300,000 children out of poverty.

These investments made by our government in our people, in our communities, and in our economy are now bearing fruit.

We have been able to add nearly 500,000 new jobs in our economy in the last two years. Just this past October, 89,000 full-time jobs were created. The steady rate of job growth has led to the unemployment rate dropping to 6.3%, the lowest level in over a decade.

Additionally, due to the historic investments made by our government, youth unemployment is also at the lowest level in decades. In Brampton West, I had the privilege this summer to visit many local organizations taking part in the Canada summer jobs program. This program helps provide essential experience for youth all across Canada. Our government doubled the funding and doubled the number of jobs for students. In Brampton West, organizations were able to hire over 150 youth through the summer jobs program. That is real change.

Our economic policies have also made a mark on the international stage. Canada has seen the highest growth rate of all G7 countries, with our economy growing at an average rate of 3.7% over the last year. As a result of of this strong economic growth, our government is able to invest more in Canadian families and our communities.

In our fall economic statement, we announced a number of measures aimed toward ensuring that those in the middle class and those working hard to join it share in the success we achieve as a country.

We announced further action to strengthen the Canada child benefit. When it was first announced, the Canada child benefit helped provide more money to nine out of 10 families and lift 300,000 children out of poverty. This was significant for the people of Brampton West.

Starting in July 2018, the Canada child benefit will increase with the cost of living, two years ahead of schedule. In my riding of Brampton West, this means that a single parent of two making $35,000 will receive over $560 more next year tax-free for books, for skating lessons, or for warm clothes for winter for their children.

Additionally, our government announced an enhancement of the working income tax benefit. By letting low-income workers take home more money, the working income tax benefit offers real help to over 1.5 million Canadians. Our government is doing more to help those working hard to join the middle class by enhancing the WITB by an additional $500 million per year starting in 2019. These changes will encourage more Canadians to enter the workforce and further boost our economy. (1040)

Now, let us talk about our job creators. Small businesses are the backbone of our economy and they help create jobs in our communities and throughout the country. That is why in our fall economic statement we announced that the small business tax rate would be cut from 10.5% currently to 9% in 2019. This will provide small businesses with up to $7,500 in tax savings per year to reinvest in their businesses. For a local small business in my riding of Brampton West, such as AJ's Bar and Grill, this means more money to hire new employees and expand its services.

The steps we have taken since being elected have helped create this environment of growth and optimism. Bill C-63 looks to build on our policies and bring more prosperity for middle-class Canadians.

This budget implementation act would support the middle class and those working hard to be part of it by protecting the rights of federally regulated workers when they seek flexible work arrangements from their employers. Some of the ways we are helping Canadian families balance work and family responsibilities are by providing greater flexibility for annual vacation days and holidays, more bereavement days in the event of losing a loved one, and more unpaid leave for family responsibilities. These changes would greatly impact the young families in Brampton West who are just starting out in their lives.

Our government also recogn...”

Ms. Kamal Khera

November 7th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...them for the wealthiest 1%. We introduced the Canada child benefit, which has helped nine out of 10 families in Canada and has taken 300,000 kids out of poverty.

With respect to my hon. member's...”

Hon. Judy A. Sgro (Humber River—Black Creek, Lib.)

November 7th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ure that is going to provide flexibility. The changes in Bill C-63 would allow more flexibility for families when they need an opportunity for some special time for a variety of issues.

Could my...”

Hon. Judy A. Sgro (Humber River—Black Creek, Lib.)

November 7th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... be interested to hear more about the tweaking of flex leave and the areas where we can better help families throughout Canada.”

Mr. Andy Fillmore (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Democratic Institutions, Lib.)

November 7th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...using, every other goal our citizens strive to achieve becomes secondary. Without adequate shelter, families struggle to raise their children, to get educated, to find and keep employment, and even to...”

Mr. Peter Schiefke (Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister (Youth), Lib.)

November 7th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...priorities, those that will have the biggest impact on our economic growth, namely investing in our families, lowering taxes for the middle class, and supporting the success of our SMEs.

I am also proud to say that employment was up in October, particularly for young people between the ages of 15 and 24. As the Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister for Youth, I am honoured to see that our plan to help young people is also working. Programs, such as Canada summer jobs, are working. They are giving 35,000 more young Canadians across the country work experience every summer.

The strength of our economy shows that more young people than ever are finding jobs and kick-starting their careers. We are helping young Canadians get the skills they need to succeed through new investments in innovation and job training. In September, we announced a $73-million investment to create 60,000 new student work placements over five years in co-operation with universities, colleges, and polytechnics. (1145) [English]

To see that our investments in young Canadians are working is enough, in my view, to support the measures of the second budget implementation act as part of this government's broader economic strategy. However, our plan does not stop with our young people.

This government's strategy is comprehensive and focused on areas that matter most for our middle class. That is why our first-ever act as government was to lower taxes on the middle class and increase them on Canada's top 1%. It is why we introduced the more generous and tax-free Canada child benefit, and most recently indexed it to the cost of living as it continues to rise. For the same reasons we recently committed to lowering the tax rate for small businesses in Canada to 9% over the next 15 months. Because of these bold policies, Canada is now the fastest growing economy in the G7. We have the most competitive small business tax rate and the lowest overall tax costs for small businesses. With nearly 99% of companies in Canada being small businesses, it is important to ensure that we build an economic system that works for them, allowing them to grow and flourish for years to come. However, there is always more work to be done, and better is indeed always possible.

Therefore, to continue on the incredible success that we have seen in the last two years, we must work to implement key portions of the 2017 budget. Bill C-63 would do just that. Allow me to highlight some key points that will mean the most to my community of Vaudreuil—Soulanges.

The budget implementation bill no. 2 takes steps to implement our innovation and skills plan, which focuses some of our investments where they matter most in helping Canadians navigate the changing landscape of the 21st century economy. By doing so, we will create a labour force that works for Canadians.

Bill C-63 seeks to implement a $1 billion innovation and skills plan as part of budget 2017, with $600 million toward new financing for clean tech firms. This is welcome news and goes beyond the bold steps this government has already taken to protect our environment and grow a green economy in 2017 and beyond.

We have already tripled investments in clean tech since forming government only two years ago. This goes hand in hand with the government's commitment to a clean growth economy, including the $2 billion low-carbon economy fund and the $21.9 billion in green infrastructure outlined in budget 2017. By prioritizing clean growth, the proposed budget implementation bill pushes our government's plans for a green economy further than ever before.

By seeking a balance for our economy, Bill C-63 will keep our support on track for the middle class and those working hard to join it. It aims for balance in other areas of our economy as well. The budget implementation bill seeks to put in place measures to ensure that Canadian workers will have greater flexibility in achieving a healthy work-life balance, helping those with families and sick loved ones to spend more time at home when they need to.

I am lucky to be the father of two beautiful children, Ellie and Anderson. I am lucky to serve my community and build a better country for my children at the same time. I am also lucky to have an incredible partner in helping meet these challenges and finding that balance between my responsibilities as an MP and as a father.

This is challenging. It is a challenge that many Canadians, including those in my community, know all too well. More Canadian families than ever before must find new and innovative ways to strike that balance as parents who work to support their children and who spend time with them at home.

That is why this government extended parental leave in Canada from 12 to 18 months at 33% of the parent's income. The budget implementation bill takes the next steps in our plan and would give Canadians more flexibility in federally regulated industries to have a better work-life balance, allowing more room to take vacation and holidays when they need them, to take care of a family member, and to prepare to grieve after losing a loved one.[Translation]

Canadians deserve the opportunity to live and work in a way that best accommodates their aspirations, their families, and their choices. It is our duty as MPs to help them any way we can.

Bill C-63 contains significant measures that are necessary to securing the future Canadians expect. Those measures include strengthening our green economy, more flexibility for federally regulated employees, and the implementation of certain measures in budget 2017.

I encourage all members of the House who share these values to support Bill C-63 and, in so doing, support the middle class, our small businesses, and our economy.

I encourage those who are still unsure to take a look at our government's economic update. We have the lowest overall tax rates for small businesses and the fastest economic growth in the G7. We have cut taxes for the middle class and provided support to middle-class families. Wages are up and child poverty is down. We have invested in our economy, and we have helpe...”

Mr. Peter Schiefke

November 7th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... brought in the Canada child benefit, which is putting more money in the pockets of nine out of ten families and that money is not taxable.

In my riding of Vaudreuil—Soulanges, that represents $72 million for families. I am sure that the numbers are roughly the same in my hon. colleague's riding.

We ha...”

Mr. Paul Lefebvre (Sudbury, Lib.)

November 7th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...nadians who have a hard time making ends meet with more money to invest in their children and their families.

In my riding of Sudbury alone, we are seeing 7,100 payments a month, benefiting over...”

Mr. Richard Cannings (South Okanagan—West Kootenay, NDP)

November 7th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...$900 million over five years, it leveraged more than $4 billion in retrofit investments by Canadian families. The government got five times the economic impact from its investment. When homeowners inv...”

Mr. Gord Johns (Courtenay—Alberni, NDP)

November 7th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ght by their villages. They can be part of this great story of Canada. They just want to feed their families. They want to grow an economy that works for everybody, and be a partner in this nation. Th...”

Ms. Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.)

November 7th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...e Canada child tax benefit has put more non-taxable dollars in the pockets of thousands of Canadian families. When the Canada child tax benefit was established, the additional money in parents’ pockets had an immediate effect on consumer confidence and economic growth. The increased confidence this money gives families had an immediate impact on economic growth. This is excellent news.

The credit also benefits all children, unlike the tax credits for child fitness and children’s arts proposed by the previous government. In Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, 10,300 families are receiving more money thanks to the Canada child tax benefit. Also, 18,870 children dire...”

Ms. Linda Lapointe

November 7th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...olleague said, this is a key element of our budget and our platform.

I care about helping the families and businesses in my riding succeed. I am proud to say that, since coming into effect, the Canada child benefit has helped 18,830 children in my riding by giving 10,300 families an average of $530 per month tax free.

When families have more money in their pockets, the whole economy benefits. Jobs are up in Quebec and acr...”

Mr. Michael Levitt (York Centre, Lib.)

November 7th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...enth-Day Adventist Church. Angie's efforts have been felt throughout our community, bringing youth, families, and seniors together in common cause.

I want to also recognize the other 14 award wi...”

Mr. Bill Casey (Cumberland—Colchester, Lib.)

November 7th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...th the successful resettlement of new Canadians in Cumberland County, Nova Scotia. When the refugee families landed here from Syria in 2016, the community welcomed them with open arms. One volunteer, ...”

Mr. John Oliver (Oakville, Lib.)

November 7th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...e haven for women and children in crisis and providing education to build a future without abuse in families.

This afternoon, I am co-hosting Hope in High Heels on the Hill in support of the fig...”

Hon. Andrew Scheer (Leader of the Opposition, CPC)

November 7th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...convincing performance yesterday.

The Liberals love picking on local businesses, middle-class families, and even the sick. However, when the Minister of Finance and the Liberal bagman try to hid...”

Mr. Jacques Gourde (Lévis—Lotbinière, CPC)

November 7th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ng money in tax havens and weaseling out of their tax obligations here at home. Unlike middle-class families, they are not paying their fair share.

Why are the Liberals going after people with d...”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

November 7th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...tuation where our economy is growing faster than it has grown in a decade. This is helping Canadian families to succeed.”

Hon. Steven Blaney

November 7th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...e House of Commons seems to have inadvertently misled the House, since we know that eight out of 10 families in Canada are paying more in taxes. I am calling on the hon. member to withdraw her statement. I am seeking unanimous consent to table the Fraser Institute report that shows that Canadian families are paying more in taxes under the Liberals.”

Mr. Todd Doherty (Cariboo—Prince George, CPC)

November 6th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“....

Before I move onto this, it is appropriate that I send our thoughts and prayers to friends, families, colleagues, and first responders who attended the church shooting in Sutherland Springs, Texas. Our thoughts and prayers are with the friends, the families, and all first responders in that entire community. Just as they are grieving, we are grieving with them.

I thought about what I would say on the fall economic statement. Today, I will talk about our legacy because, at the end of the day, all of us will be remembered for something. In preparing for this speech, I stumbled across a couple of quotes that I thought I would enter into the records. The first is, “No legacy is so rich as honesty.” That was by William Shakespeare. Over the last two year, we have seen the Prime Minister's actions, his direction and his choice of how he will move forward in his mandate or what he believes is his mandate.

I coached for a long time. I would always tell our kids, when I was coaching hockey, or baseball, or soccer or when I was working with youth groups, that they would go through this life once. At the end of the day, all they would have was their integrity, their legacy. I would ask them what they would like to leave behind, or what would be their brand as they moved through life. When I would worked in schools, I would talked to kids. I would ask them what a brand was. They would say that a brand was the swoosh on a Nike shoe, or it was the great big A&W sign or the bear for A&W. I would tell them that their brand was what people would say about them after they left the room. The kids talked about the the swoosh or all those other items. These are logos and marketing tools, but a brand is really what people say about us.

If we compare governments and prime ministers over the years, Prime Minister Harper took us from back row and second from the left to principled leadership and the front row. That will no doubt elicit jabs from the other side, but I want to offer this. We had a leader who was principled, who put his thoughts always on Canadians, how our policy would impact those who elected us, how we were seen on the world stage with respect to Canada as a collective as one nation, and I have the examples to back it up. (1205)

There are those of us who are more concerned about how we are perceived through the lens of others than how our actions are perceived and what our legacy will be. I will use a very recent example.

We have a young Prime Minister who has been in Vogue. He has been seen planking, photo bombing through Stanley Park in my beautiful province of British Columbia. He has been seen with his shirt off. Far be it for me to criticize.

We had a leader who was known for his principled leadership. Now there is a leader who is known for fancy socks or for showing up in question period in a Superman Halloween costume underneath his clothes. I was in the House that day. Many on this side were wondering if he had a new haircut. Somebody said that he was trying to be Waldo. I said no. I said that if we had learned anything over the last two years, it was that he believed he was Superman. I said he was trying to Clark Kent. The Prime Minister left part way through question period and returned quickly. Shortly thereafter in social media was the Prime Minister coming down the stairs showing the large Superman logo. He thought that was very novel and that it would be on the front page of newspapers.

At a time when fishers, farmers, and small business people are suffering, the Prime Minister is being investigated by the Ethics Commissioner. The finance minister is embroiled in an investigation, one that I do not know we ever have seen before. He seemingly has profited since being in office. He introduced legislation that would benefit the companies in which he had assets. We now know that there are more hidden businesses, numbered companies, in the Bahamas. The latest leak in the last 24 hours is that there are more questions. Canadians are hearing about questionable actions, which are leading to more questions.

I come back to our legacy. When I ran in the election, I had an opportunity to speak to a few members of Parliament, a few MLAs, and leaders within the community, who I hold in high esteem. They are really my mentors and I respect them. They put our constituents first. I think the world of Mayor Lyn Hall in my riding. During the course of the wildfires, he led his team with actions, not just words. He helped alongside myself and some of the MLAs as our community grew beyond our traditional population base. We welcomed 11,000 evacuees into our community and looked after them. We opened up our hearts and homes and looked after them.

With true leadership, MLA Mike Morris, MLA Shirley Bond, and MLA John Rustad did whatever they could to ensure that those in our communities were cared for. We do that every day, not just when there are emergencies. Why? Because we care more for how those in the community who elected us are doing than getting a picture on the front page of a newspaper, wearing new socks, walking a red carpet, or taking a selfie. We care about those who elect us. We care deeply about our communities. We care deeply about Canadians. (1210)

We have a government that campaigned on promises to Canadians, that said they were ready to lead. They said real change will be coming. Have we ever seen real change. The Liberals announced in their fall fiscal update that they have no plan to get back to a balanced budget. They have no plan, because it is not their money. They have no idea.

When I talk about my family finances, I do not refer to them as my fortune. In my riding of Cariboo—Prince George, there are very few people who can stand before a mike or a camera and talk about their family's fortune. They would probably say they are worried about their family's finances or how they are going to make ends meet. They would probably say they are worried about the fact that Canada does not have a softwood lumber agreement in place.

There is a further concern in terms of one of our number one industries within the province of British Columbia. This past weekend, Tolko, one of the largest mills in my riding and located in Williams Lake, had a massive fire. This added further insult to the fact that we lost 53-million cubic metres of fibre in the wildfires this past summer.

The Liberal government has dithered away any opportunity to get a softwood lumber agreement in place, and hundreds of people have been waiting to see their government stand up for them and fight. Now there is further uncertainty in our communities. There is further uncertainty in our communities because of what the government has done. The Liberals like to say that Canadians are far better off, but the reality is that hydro, gasoline, home heating, health and dental benefits, employee discounts, personal savings, life-saving therapies, and local businesses have all been attacked by them, regardless of what they say.

People at home are listening to this debate today. People in the gallery are listening. I can say that everyone gets talking points. Government members get talking points. When we ask the hard questions that Canadians want us to ask, time and time again the Liberals will stand up and give the same repetitive answer, which turns out to be a non-answer. Why is that? It is because they do not believe they have to answer to Canadians.

There is another quote that I want to mention, “All good men and women must take responsibility to create legacies that will take the next generation to a level we could only imagine.” What level are we talking about for the next generation? Under the leadership of Prime Minister Trudeau, what is the government going to leave to the next generation? The debt we are incurring today, the money we are talking about today, is not free money. It has to be paid back. Who is going to pay that money back? It will be my kids. It will be their kids. The next generation will have to pay it back. That will be the Liberal legacy.

I have stood in the House a number of times since the summer. I have talked about the wildfires and how our communities managed to rally together. (1215)

Speaking about legacies, there is a gentleman back home who is very sick. I believe he knew how sick he was during the summer. Regardless of how sick he was, he continued to fight the fires. He continued to lead teams all on his own. He is a local logging contractor whose name is Lee Todd. He is legendary in the Cariboo. However, he was sick, and I am not quite sure how sick, but he flew his personal helicopter to try to spot where the first fires were. He led other local contractors.

In the Cariboo, we do not take no for an answer and we do whatever we can to get things done. Regardless of whether it is prescribed, we just get it done. We do not ask for permission, many times we beg forgiveness afterward, but we get the job done. Nobody knows what tomorrow is going to bring but, for me, one of Lee's legacies is going to be that regardless of his own health and well-being, he continued to lead and do whatever he could. For example, he opened his shop and fed the firefighters and contractors who wanted to save our community.

I throw that in because, again, when we are talking about legacy and moving forward, we have to be reminded time and again that this House does not belong to us. It does not belong to the government or to those of us on the side. It belongs to Canadians. We were elected to be here and be their voices. We have talked about parliamentary privilege over the last year. That privilege is not so we can get to the front of line, ride in fancy vehicles, or attend fancy events. Parliamentary privilege is there to protect the rights of Canadians. This has been forgotten.

We have a Prime Minister and a House leader who wanted to change the standing rules of the House because they thought it would modernize them. They have invoked closure on debate, time allocation, time and again. I know what is going to come from the other side. They are going to start pointing fingers and saying that when those guys were in power this is what they did. Well, I can only speak about my experience. I am a new member of Parliament, as people know. I am fortunate that the good people of Cariboo—Prince George elected me. I have lived every day of being elected with the mindset of asking what my legacy is, because I may only get the chance to be elected once. We do not know how long this opportunity is going to last. Whatever we do, we should try to impact and change as many lives as we can.

Hopefully, people see that they have a fighter and I am fortunate enough to be elected in the next election. Whether it is my bill, Bill C-211, that calls on the government to develop a national framework with respect to post-traumatic stress disorder; our work in talking about the impacts of impaired driving on families, which loss never heals regardless of time; working with my colleagues on this side of the ...”

Ms. Elizabeth May (Saanich—Gulf Islands, GP)

November 6th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...gements for employees, or further in that division, the part that would guarantee time off work for families who are victims of family violence.”

Mr. Arif Virani (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Canadian Heritage (Multiculturalism), Lib.)

November 6th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...Over the last two years, I have heard from my constituents on issues that affect them and their families daily. I have heard their concerns and what they would like to see addressed by the government. I know that the positive measurers included in this proposed act will help to resolve my constituents' most pressing concerns.

Canada has the fastest growing economy in the entire G7, and as a government, we are dedicated to reinvesting the benefits of that growth back into Canada to better the lives of my constituents in Parkdale—High Park and, indeed, all Canadians. Our government will lower taxes on small businesses, offer more support to families through the Canada child benefit, enhance the working income tax benefit, and also advance indigenous reconciliation.

There have been 500,000 jobs created since 2015. Over 1.5 million low-income workers will receive support to advance their careers and provide for their families. Canada's unemployment rate has dropped from 7.1% in September 2015, just before the last federal election, down to 6.2% in September of this year. Youth unemployment figures across the country are also at historic lows. Building on this positive growth, our government is enhancing the working income tax benefit by $500 million, which will benefit 1.4 million Canadians. Additionally, to encourage entrepreneurship and innovation in our communities, we are lowering the small business tax from 11% to 9%.

This is a strong budget that will benefit people from coast to coast, including my fellow residents of Parkdale—High Park. This will be done by ensuring tax fairness, thanks to this new budget implementation act. It will put Canada's most skilled, talented, and innovative individuals at the heart of our future economy, creating more jobs both in the short term and the long term. We will also be implementing an agenda that addresses the changing nature of the economy to ensure that it will work for all Canadians.

This legislation allocates $400 million for the venture capital catalyst initiative. This will directly benefit start-ups, entrepreneurs, and small businesses in Parkdale—High Park and right around the country. It is the small business owners, like those in the neighbourhoods of my riding, like the Junction, Swansea Village, and Parkdale itself, and Bloor west village that not only stimulate our economy but also support the families living in our very community.

In the last couple of years, it has been a pleasure to engage in conversations time and time again with small business owners in Parkdale—High Park, who make up the fabric of the fantastic neighbourhoods where we live, and shop, and raise our families. I also held a town hall with small business owners at the end of September. I listened carefully to their concerns and relayed those concerns back to cabinet and the minister.

Our government has responded. As a result of this important feedback, we are determined to limit any changes in the tax treatment of passive income to 3% of Canadian businesses who hold more than $1 million in their corporate accounts. We have also decided not to move forward with measures relating to the conversion of income into capital gains.

I know that many of my constituents work long hours, and sometimes maintain more than one job to advance their careers and to support themselves and their families. Therefore, I will address the working income tax benefit, because this zones in on so many millions around this country, the hard-working Canadians, whether they live alone, with families, or are supporting seniors. In fact, the working income tax benefit is particularly zoned in on those living alone, who are now, according to the most recent census, the most common type of household in the entire country. For those people, it will alleviate the stress of managing the cost of housing and living expenses throughout a given month. For a single person balancing escalating costs, it will ease the transition back into the workforce. It will also reduce income inequality and help to reduce poverty in this country.

In addition to assisting working Canadians, we are acting on our priority of supporting communities' most vulnerable people: children and families in need of additional resources. We are doing so through this budget implementation act by enhancing the Canada child benefit. Once we heard from families across the country, our government took measures to cut taxes on Canada's middle class, as well as to introduce the Canada child benefit, a much-warranted change that creates tax-free benefits targeted to help those who need it the most. (1255)

The new Canada child benefit has already been tremendously successful. In fact, it informs a lot of the economic growth I referenced in the first part of my remarks. As the result of this very program, nine out of 10 families already benefit from the CCB, and 300,000 children have been lifted out of poverty as compared to the year 2014-15. The impact of these measures cannot be underestimated. This impact is being felt by families who contribute to our communities and local economy by investing back into communities with things like piano lessons at High Park Music, swimming lessons at the Parkdale Community Recreation Centre, or simply by purchasing healthier food for one's kids at the various farmers markets in my riding.

As a result of the enhancements to the Canada child benefit, in 2017-18, more than 1.2 million will have benefited in the province of Ontario, my home province, and they will continue to receive additional support. Why? Because our government has made a commitment to further strengthening the Canada child benefit to make sure it keeps pace with the cost of living. Starting next July, two full years ahead of schedule, the tax-free Canada child benefit amounts for families with two children will go up by approximately $200. It does not stop there. The following year, those families will see about $500 more.

One of the major concerns I have heard in conversations with many of the parents and families living in my riding of Parkdale—High Park is the cost of raising a family. In order to effectively address this, we are allocating more support for families, through the CCB, to help meet the numerous ongoing costs of raising a family. As the father of two young boys, I understand what it means to raise a family. I have also heard from countless people in my riding about those challenges. We are working in a targeted way to address the needs of those people in my community and in communities around this country who need the help the most.

The stats are quite overwhelming. In my riding alone, 10,290 children benefited from the Canada child benefit in July. The average payment that month was $510 per family, for a total of $3.255 million distributed to families in the riding of Parkdale—High Park. In addition to the benefits received by my neighbours through the new and enhanced programs I mentioned, this budget implementation act also includes measures that would entrench and fortify our commitment as a government and nation to reconciliation with indigenous persons.

As Canadians, we must continue to take a critical look at our past as we contemplate the future of our relationship with indigenous persons. It is vital for all of us to establish a spirit of reconciliation so that Canada's next 150 years leave a positive legacy. I am honoured, distinctly in my role as Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Heritage, to be working with the Minister of Heritage on advancing our government's efforts to preserve, restore, and revitalize indigenous languages. This goes beyond the celebration of our collective history. It is an opportunity to begin to correct the impact of harmful government policies like the colonial legacy of the residential school system has had on indigenous communities.

Recognizing this, the budget implementation act would invest $90 million over the next three years to support indigenous languages and culture. That includes $69 million in new funding to support things like language classes and culture camps, developing learning materials, and recording indigenous languages through the aboriginal languages initiative. Funding would also support the use of technology to preserve oral histories and the creation of other interactive educational materials. These investments would build tangibly on our government's commitment to working with indigenous persons to co-develop, in the spirit of true reconciliation, an indigenous languages legislation that would help to preserve, protect, revitalize, and promote indigenous languages in this country.

We are investing, as a government, based on the positive gains that have come as a result of Canada's fastest economic growth in nearly a decade, by enhancing the measures that support our small businesses, families, and hard-working people, and furthering our commitment to reconciliation. I urge all membe...”

Mr. Tom Kmiec (Calgary Shepard, CPC)

November 6th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...actively impede the success of the Canadian energy industry here in Canada, putting a lot of energy families out of work, while supporting the middle class in Asian countries.”

Mr. Randeep Sarai (Surrey Centre, Lib.)

November 6th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...growth back in the hands of the people who made it happen. We get to put money back in the hands of families.

I have always been proud of our government's Canada child benefit and what it does for Surrey Centre. In fact, the benefit ensures that $800 million a year tax-free goes to families in my riding. This measure goes a long way toward ensuring Surrey families will not have to make the choice between school supplies or new skates for their children. However, in the words of our Prime Minister, “better is always possible”.

One year ago, when I spoke regarding the implementation of the 2016 budget, I was happy to note that our government would be indexing the Canada child benefit to inflation starting in 2020. This year, I am even happier to note that we will be moving forward on this measure two years ahead of schedule. Thanks to the strengthened Canada child benefit, a single parent of two making $35,000 a year will receive $560 of richly deserved non-taxable dollars the next fiscal year..

Our commitment to families goes beyond finance. Bill C-63 would also create greater flexibility in the way employees c...”

Mr. Ben Lobb (Huron—Bruce, CPC)

November 6th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...anadian Legion launched their annual poppy campaign to raise funds in support of veterans and their families.

On the same day members of the Port Elgin Legion began preparing Christmas care pack...”

Mr. Geng Tan (Don Valley North, Lib.)

November 6th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“... of them, who first got involved as young mothers, are now grandmothers but are still helping other families' children to enjoy learning opportunities.

The committee is making a significant and ...”

Mr. Joe Peschisolido (Steveston—Richmond East, Lib.)

November 6th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...his centre is a one-stop shop for special programs, support services, and specialized resources for families affected by autism spectrum disorder and related disorders.[English]

Created through the vision of Sergio and Wendy Cocchia, and many others, the Hub is the first of its kind in North America.[Translation]

I am grateful to Sergio, Wendy, and everyone at the centre for the warm welcome they gave me and for everything they do for so many families. I wish them every success with their expansion plans, which will allow them to extend their specialized services to more families across British Columbia.”

Mr. Scott Duvall (Hamilton Mountain, NDP)

November 6th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“... to reflect the profound support across Canada to make the laws fair for Canadian workers and their families.

The collapse of Sears Canada focused attention on the depth of unfairness in our sys...”

Hon. Andrew Scheer (Regina—Qu'Appelle, CPC)

November 6th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...rings, Texas.

Regardless of the circumstances, cowardly, murderous acts like these, targeting families and friends, always leave us stunned and deeply saddened. (1415) [English]

These victims were simply gathering with their community to celebrate their faith, a faith that is focused on joyous acceptance of others and love for our fellow human beings. For millions of people around the world, including Canada, and for our friends in the United States, faith is the wellspring for our principles and can be such a force for good.

We pray that in time God will grant the families and friends of yesterday's victims the peace that was so cruelly taken from them by a madman this weekend.

On behalf of the Conservative Party and my caucus, I wish to extend our deepest condolences and sympathy to the victims and their families.”

Hon. Andrew Leslie (Orléans, Lib.)

November 6th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...seless and horrific act of violence in Sutherland Springs. We extend our deepest condolences to the families and friends of those killed, and we wish a speedy recovery to all those harmed.

That ...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

November 6th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...Mr. Speaker, if you will permit, on behalf of all Canadians, I extend my deepest condolences to the families and friends of those who were killed in Texas, and we hope for a speedy recovery for all of...”

Hon. Andrew Scheer (Leader of the Opposition, CPC)

November 6th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... fortune in a tax haven.

Why is the Prime Minister still making honest, middle-class Canadian families pay more while allowing his friends to avoid paying taxes in Canada?”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

November 6th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...le class. We have delivered a Canada child benefit that gives more money to nine out of 10 Canadian families to help with the high cost of raising kids. We did that by stopping to send child benefit cheques to millionaire families. On top of that, we are lowering small business taxes to 9%. We have put more money in the ...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

November 6th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... That is why we created the Canada child benefit, which gives more tax-free money to nine out of 10 families every month. That is why we are in the process of lowering the small business tax rate to 9...”

Hon. Navdeep Bains (Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development, Lib.)

November 6th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...Speaker, our government supports secure pensions. More importantly, we understand workers and their families and the dedication and commitment they make to various companies. It is important that we work with them.

With respect to the CCAA process, that process is designed to help companies in financial distress, so that they can restructure their affairs in order to come out of that restructuring process to help, preserve, and create thousands of jobs.

With respect to Sears, the current issue at hand, we are working with Sears Canada employees across the country, and Service Canada, in order to provide assistance and support to the workers and their families.”

Ms. Sheila Malcolmson (Nanaimo—Ladysmith, NDP)

November 6th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...eral government, like strangling bureaucracy and lack of resources. It is clear the Liberals misled families when they promised they were doing everything they could to help this inquiry succeed.

Will the Liberals support the families of missing and murdered indigenous women, and when will they stop blocking the inquiry's wo...”

Hon. Carolyn Bennett (Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs, Lib.)

November 6th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, the important work of the commission is crucial to getting the answers the families have been waiting decades for, and to ending this ongoing tragedy. We are absolutely committed to ensuring that the commission has all the support it needs to succeed. We have struck a working group to create and provide effective back-office support to the commission to ensure it is able to do its work effectively. Families must and will get the answers they need.”

Hon. Erin O'Toole (Durham, CPC)

November 6th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...n squeezing Canadian small businesses for more tax revenue. It has been taking away tax relief from families fighting diabetes, autism, and mental health issues.

However, what is the one group the Liberals have left alone? Their super-rich friends and those working hard to join them. When will the Prime Minister stop targeting hard-working Canadian families and start closing tax and ethics loopholes used by his friends?”

Hon. Diane Lebouthillier (Minister of National Revenue, Lib.)

November 6th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...r the middle class and for persons with disabilities. We increased the Canada child benefit to help families. We lowered the age of retirement, we increased the guaranteed income supplement—”

Ms. Jenny Kwan (Vancouver East, NDP)

November 6th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, children and their families who have been impacted for years by the no-fly list are on Parliament Hill today demanding an end to this human rights violation.

There are children as young as six being denied from boarding flights. Canadians want to see a properly funded redress system in the 2018 federal budget, and they want an end to the hundreds, if not thousands, of false positives that have occurred to date.

When will the government finally heed these calls and end this injustice for families once and for all?”

Mr. Matthew Dubé (Beloeil—Chambly, NDP)

November 6th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... every single time they try to travel. I would ask the minister if he wants to go in front of those families to tell them, “Do not worry, your child is not on the list.” These are the false positives ...”

Hon. Ralph Goodale (Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, Lib.)

November 6th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...the child as a primary factor for the Canada Border Services Agency when making decisions affecting families. The goal is to avoid children in detention as much as humanly possible. We are committed t...”

Ms. Marjolaine Boutin-Sweet (Hochelaga, NDP)

November 6th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ederal government for help increasing the supply of social housing units.

In Montreal, 25,000 families are waiting for social housing. The mayor is adding her voice to that of the Federation of ...”

Hon. Jean-Yves Duclos (Minister of Families, Children and Social Development, Lib.)

November 6th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...provide extraordinary opportunities to strengthen the Government of Canada's role in supporting our families in Quebec and elsewhere in Canada.”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

November 6th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ter year, members sit in this House and do important work on behalf of Canadians, work that impacts families and communities, work that shapes the course of people's daily lives.

Because of the ...”

Mr. Ken Hardie (Fleetwood—Port Kells, Lib.)

November 3rd
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“... prospered, as people from around the world have chosen this land to build better futures for their families. This week, our government moved to ensure that better future with a new strategy for our immigration program, one that is practical and compassionate, one that ensures we will have new workers to fill the jobs employers cannot fill, the expertise our innovators need to grow new businesses and create new jobs, and the families to strengthen our communities. That is what has helped build Fleetwood—Port Kells into the ...”

Ms. Jenny Kwan (Vancouver East, NDP)

November 3rd
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...ally close to the hearts of our community, as we continue to fight for and stand in solidarity with families of the missing and murdered indigenous women and girls.

The festival offers over 100 ...”

Mr. Robert Morrissey (Egmont, Lib.)

November 3rd
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...ur communities across the country continue to be safe places for Canadians to live, work, and raise families.

I am honoured today to recognize one officer in particular, Chief David Poirier of t...”

Mr. Joël Godin (Portneuf—Jacques-Cartier, CPC)

November 3rd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ses with their tax reform, the Liberals are trying to save themselves a few bucks at the expense of families of people with autism and people with type 1 diabetes. If they really want to find more cas...”

Ms. Kim Rudd (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources, Lib.)

November 3rd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...nd we do thank them very much for their service.

We understand that those employees and their families are working to have their contributions recognized. We are aware of the Senate motion broug...”

Mr. Jean-Claude Poissant (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food, Lib.)

November 3rd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...Speaker, our government is a strong proponent of supply management and supports producers and their families.

We are pleased to have invested $350 million in the industry in order to modernize a...”

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie

November 3rd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...raise our children. We would not choose spouses without knowing their values and whether we and our families could get along. We always need the best information possible when make these types of deci...”

Mr. Harold Albrecht (Kitchener—Conestoga, CPC)

November 3rd
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...emely low vacancy rate meant landlords were able to ask for premium rental prices. For lower-income families and individuals, this often made housing utterly unaffordable. Housing also became a dangerous proposition: desperate to find a roof over their heads, people took chances on unsafe, substandard housing and were unwilling to report poor conditions, for fear of losing what they had.

...

In late 2000... [the Mennonite Central Committee of Ontario] (MCCO) Program Director, invited several people with social programming experience to be part of a small working group that would explore how to respond to this need for affordable housing.

...

By May 2001, the working group invited 40 people including Mennonite and Brethren in Christ pastors, together with members of their churches who were community leaders in health and social services, into the discernment process to determine the will to respond collectively to this need and to determine what form the response would take.

A number of meetings later, and after securing commitment from churches and individuals, the incorporation of MennoHomes was complete.

While individuals in other churches and denominations as well as community members at large have been strongly supportive of MennoHomes, it has primarily been a Mennonite initiative and the Mennonite community in the Kitchener-Waterloo area has responded strongly to every capital fundraising drive and has a strong sense of this being “our” project.

...

Soon after the incorporation process was completed, the Region of Waterloo put out a call to groups interested in affordable housing saying they had funding available for family housing. MennoHomes made an “Expression of Interest” and was approved. The search for property on which to build began.

At this time, Faith Lutheran Church on Village Road in the Forrest Hill area of Kitchener was planning a change to their building to improve accessibility, and decided instead to build a new sanctuary. The project would be funded by the sale of a large piece of land at the back of their property.

...

However, as Pastor Hamp said, “We ran into a bit of a struggle with our neighbours. We had a lot of phone calls from neighbours worrying and complaining about what it would do to the neighbourhood, to house values.” A series of meetings with community members followed, with angry words and even threats, but the situation remained deadlocked and intense until finally one neighbourhood resident Wendy Shaw became a bridge between the two sides. She met with each of her 66 neighbours who had opposed the project and who planned to take their grievances to the Ontario Municipal Board. Wendy brought the concerns of the neighbours to MennoHomes. This resulted in MennoHomes changing the design and reducing the number of units, as well as guaranteeing long term, active involvement with the project to ensure that it would be well-integrated into the neighbourhood.

...

Tenants moved into the eight duplexes on Village Road in July and August, 2004. They were met by Dorene and were each given a hand-made quilt. One resident said of the quilts she was given, “I appreciate every hour, every stitch and every thought that was put into those blankets. I will cherish them for the rest of my life.”

Dorene met with the residents on a regular basis. “There were a number of new Canadian families and we wanted to make sure they were aware of various agencies in the community. As a board, we wanted to develop a sense of community among the families. We held a barbecue in the summer and a Christmas dinner (where we recognized Ramadan and other holidays).” A tenant said of the Community Worker role, “No matter what the need, whether it be a ride, food, clothing, community information, or simply a shoulder to cry on, she was there. Because many of us have been isolated from our families and hometowns, every bit of inclusion and support is meaningful.”

Therefore, we can s...”

Ms. Jenny Kwan (Vancouver East, NDP)

November 3rd
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“... services. Above the centre will be 180 units of affordable rental housing for indigenous youth and families. With over a decade of hard work and many partnerships, 50,000 square feet of land has been secured for the project, and fundraising efforts to fund the construction are under way. The organization has already raised $2.6 million to date for this project and is requesting $10 million from the federal government so they can complete it.

I hope that the federal government will join and be a partner of this initiative, especially when we consider the fact that in Vancouver, 34% of our homeless population is indigenous when it only comprises 2% of the general population. In fact, what we need is a national indigenous housing strategy. (1405)

I have mentioned that the rental vacancy rate in metro Vancouver has been sitting at below 1% for a very long time and that this situation leaves renters vulnerable. It has been estimated that in B.C., there are 117,000 rental households that cannot afford their homes. There is a backlog of over 80,000 rental units required to meet current needs. To meet future demands, 7,000 new units will need to be constructed annually.

In B.C., many non-profit housing societies, businesses, partners, and stakeholders have come together and are ready to work to solve our housing crisis. The B.C. Rental Housing Coalition has developed a comprehensive 10-year plan to address the province's housing needs. The plan includes the construction of new housing, funds to protect and maintain current housing stock, and income and other supports for individuals and families that need it. It has put its assets, equity, and expertise on the table and is inviting the provincial government and the federal government to come to the table as equal partners.

The coalition estimates that to meet B.C.'s current housing needs, annual investments of $1.84 billion are needed. The community housing sector is ready to chip in $41 million annually and requests $691.2 million in annual investments from the federal government. While this may seem like a big price tag, the cost of doing nothing is a lot more.

Homelessness in and of itself costs Canada $7 billion annually, $1 billion in B.C. alone. It is common knowledge that every dollar we invest in providing homes for those who find themselves homeless yields over $2 of savings in areas like health care, the justice system, and other social supports. It has also been found that every dollar invested by the government in housing construction also results in $1.52 of GDP growth. In addition, making housing more affordable would increase disposable income for the average household and generate more economic activity.

From the proposals, we can also see that housing will add value to our communities beyond the provision of homes. Investing in housing also protects our culture, history, and heritage. Investing in housing is caring for our elders and youth. Investing in housing is taking steps toward reconciliation and honouring our nation-to-nation commitments to indigenous peoples. Investing in housing is nurturing families and building communities.

Innovative ideas, experienced organizations, workable plans, and secured sites are ready and in place, and we are ready to get this going. The community is coming to us with assets and work plans. In some cases, the municipal and provincial governments are ready and have been doing their part. It is time the federal government stepped up and became a partner in all these important projects.

Instead, I am disappointed to see that the money has not flowed on the ground to build real units and house real people. The Liberal government says it has a housing plan, but 90% of that promised funding will not actually be spent until after the next election. This is not acceptable when people and families are desperate now. The government needs to invest now. Not only have we not started building, but existing affordable housing stock is being threatened by government inaction.

There are 34 housing co-ops in Vancouver East, with a total of 1,669 units. If the government does not renew operating agreements and ensure that support is in place for rent subsidies for low-income families, those families and individuals, I fear, will join the ranks of Vancouver's homeless population. This must not be allowed to happen.

Not to be forgotten are the needs of the many individuals in Vancouver who are dreaming of owning their homes and raising their families but are finding this dream further and further out of reach. Many of these people who canno...”

Ms. Rachel Blaney (North Island—Powell River, NDP)

November 3rd
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...rnment, which I find interesting. In the first hour, the parliamentary secretary to the minister of families said, “If we read the UN report on housing, it is not simply about embracing a set of rights, it is about creating those policies..”.

Of course, we need policies, but what he does not understand is that governments come and go, policies come and go, funding comes and go, yet the need for housing is constantly there. What Canada needs is a legislative framework. My bill would ensure a level of structure that would empower people.

The parliamentary secretary also kept repeating that the right to housing was simply a slogan. I find this to be extremely troubling for a government that claims to be implementing the right to housing “through a wide range of federal, provincial, territorial, and municipal laws, policies, programs, and administrative measures.” Is the government saying that the right to housing is not a human right? It is not clear to me. The parliamentary secretary to the minister of families kept repeating, as late as yesterday at committee, that human rights are crucial in housing.

Bill C-325 is about dignity. Human rights are that, moral principles. When our fellow citizens do not have a place to sleep or to go to the bathroom, these are incredibly dehumanizing experiences. A home is more than physical space. Housing is intrinsic to the sense of security for families and the stability needed to prevent marginalization. All of us look at a home as an anchor ...”

Mr. Richard Cannings (South Okanagan—West Kootenay, NDP)

November 2nd
Hansard Link

Routine Proceedings

“... healthy and ecologically balanced environment is inextricably linked to the health of individuals, families, and communities. They therefore call on the House of Commons to enact legislation to imple...”

Mr. Joël Lightbound (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance, Lib.)

November 2nd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...d hundreds of thousands of children out of poverty. As a result of our CCB, nine out of 10 Canadian families are getting more in benefits than they did under the previous system. Compared to the previous system of child benefits, the CCB is more generous and better targeted to those who need it the most. [Translation]

In the fall economic statement released on October 24, the government announced that it would strengthen the Canada child benefit by indexing it to annual increases in the cost of living effective July 2018, which is two years earlier than planned.

What this means, in practical terms, is that for a single parent with two children and income of $35,000 the enhanced Canada child benefit will contribute an additional $560 in the 2019-20 benefit year towards the cost of raising his or her children. That means more money for books, winter coats, and skating lessons, for example. The added confidence that the Canada child benefit brings to families can have a positive impact on economic growth, as we have seen in the past.

Our government has also enhanced the Canada pension plan in order to provide Canadians with financial security when they retire from their hard work life. Enhancing the Canada pension plan ensures that Canadians will have more money in retirement so they are less worried about saving, can focus more on enjoying the good times with their families, and do not have to worry about financial issues.

Starting in 2019, we will be enhancing the working income tax benefit, or WITB, by an additional $500 million per year. This will put more money in the pockets of low-income workers, including families without children and the growing number of single Canadians. The enhancement will be in add...”

Mr. Joël Lightbound

November 2nd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...inciple residence exemption is available only to Canadian residents, individuals, and trusts.

Families are able to designate only one property as the family's principle residence for any given y...”

Hon. Steven Blaney (Bellechasse—Les Etchemins—Lévis, CPC)

November 2nd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...s of our most vulnerable seniors.

Why attack the middle class, which accounts for 8 out of 10 families, according to the Fraser Institute? The government is taking away more benefits than it is ...”

Hon. Pierre Poilievre

November 2nd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... the member is absolutely right, that different people start with different wealth depending on the families into which they are born. That is why we need to guard against them using that wealth to ac...”

Mr. Luc Berthold (Mégantic—L'Érable, CPC)

November 2nd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... claims to the contrary, it has increased personal income tax for the vast majority of middle-class families.

Given all the facts, the Liberal government’s rhetoric, and its promises, it is clea...”

Mr. Alexandre Boulerice (Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, NDP)

November 2nd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...use it is not sustainable.

The Liberals are not doing what we need in our communities to help families: create more public transit; build bridges, roads, arenas, and pools, and everything that makes the lives of our citizens easier; increase the possibility of business and trade and help people to get start-ups and have the numeric infrastructure and Internet connections. High speed Internet in some regions is still a big problem. It is not there.

We are worried about the way the Liberals are not doing what they promised to do. They are not spending on infrastructure and they are not creating growth in our economy.

This may surprise the House, but I am also worried about the fact that, in his last economic update, the finance minister's document said that the public debt charges that they were expecting, the interest we are paying on our debt, will increase from $24.2 billion for 2017-18 to $32.8 billion 2022-23. In five years, there will be an increase of $8 billion in the interest on public debt charges. That is a lot of money, and it will probably get worse.

Those numbers, the provision or the prediction, are based on a really low interest rate. The actual interest rate, or the provision, is about a 25-point increase per year or less. However, all the experts say that the interest rates will go higher than that, so those numbers are wrong. The economic situation is that the Bank of Canada will be in a position to increase the basic interest rate much more. Therefore, those figures will get worse, and we will pay much more than that. People who are listening to this should look at those numbers. It is not what experts say will happen.[Translation]

I want to say it again. It may surprise the House to hear that the NDP finance critic is worried about this, but in the economic update delivered last week, we learned that the projected interest charges are basically unrealistic. Between 2017 and 2018, we will be paying $24.2 billion in interest on the debt. That is a lot of money. In 2022-23, so five years later, we will be paying an estimated $32.8 billion in interest on the debt. That is an increase of over $8 billion in five years in interest alone. That probably will not happen; it could be even worse.

Those forecasts are based on current interest rates and very small yearly increases in interest rates for the next few years. Everyone agrees that, considering the current economic situation, the Bank of Canada will not be able to keep interest rates as low as they are at the moment. Interest rates will likely go up by over 25 basis points per year. The figures presented are unrealistic, and after the next federal election, we will be worse off than the Liberals are claiming today.

With regard to last week's economic update, I would like to take this opportunity to draw the attention of the House to something that I find very worrisome as a progressive and as someone who believes in public services. It has to do with what is known as direct program spending. The government has allocated $139.1 billion for direct program spending for 2017-18, $140.1 billion for the following year, and then $140.2 billion for the next. The Liberals have basically frozen this spending. They are increasing direct program spending by only $1 billion from 2017-18 to 2018-19. The following year, in 2019-20, that amount will go up by only $100 million, which is next to nothing.

With federal employees' labour contracts and collective agreements, which the government must obviously respect, and with inflation, which means that everything will cost more, we know full well that a spending freeze means cuts. The government cannot give the federal employees who provide services a 1.5% raise while failing to increase direct program spending. That will mean austerity measures and cuts to services for Canadians. That is not what the Liberals were elected for. It does not bode well for the future. Cuts and austerity measures may be imposed on public services, which are already barely meeting their obligations and the needs of Canadians.

The Liberal government tries to come across as progressive and Keynesian, but it is nothing but a facade, and the cracks will start to show in the next few years as the Liberals face a difficult choice: either reduce services, or run an even higher deficit than projected.

I just wanted to draw people's attention to this, because it is something we will have to keep a close eye on.

I want to say this in English as well, in order to bring it to the attention of the people who are listening. In the economic update last week, the direct program expenses outlook for 2017-18 were $139.1 billion. The following year they would be $140.1 billion. The year after that they would be $140.2 billion. It is almost a freeze in the direct spending in program expenses of the Liberal government.

We all know that we have to respect the working contracts of civil servants, people who work for the federal government. Those contracts, that collective bargaining, includes increased wages of at least 1.5%. We also have normal inflation. With the increase of wages and inflation, those numbers mean the Liberal government will have to impose austerity. It will have to impose cuts in public services because it is not sustainable. We cannot increase the wages of public servants, but we all agree it is normal to do. We have to respect those contracts, but those numbers worry the NDP. We do not want a policy of austerity. Even the International Monetary Fund's recent study said that austerity was not working. This is not something we want, not something we propose, and this is not something, a progressive party movement, we want to see from the federal government. (1125)

After these warnings, the only thing left to say about the budget implementation bill is that there is not much to it, and what there is is extremely disappointing. It offers no plan for investing in affordable social housing. It does not restore the eco-energy retrofit program as promised. It does not propose a national daycare program, the program that families in Quebec and across Canada would probably find the most useful.

In the NDP's opinion...”

Mr. Gérard Deltell (Louis-Saint-Laurent, CPC)

November 2nd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...f our society.

Since taking office, the Liberals have cut the tax credits that we created for families, including the arts and fitness tax credits. The Liberal government also did away with the ...”

Mr. Scott Duvall (Hamilton Mountain, NDP)

November 2nd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...k people making less than $45,000 got? What if they do not have any children? What about one-income families, a married person with no children who is making $80,000? What about a family with two inco...”

Mr. Alexandre Boulerice

November 2nd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“.... People without children have been completely abandoned by the Liberal party. Yes, we need to help families, I have a family, I like families, but there are people who decide not to have children. If they do not have any children and...”

Ms. Julie Dabrusin (Toronto—Danforth, Lib.)

November 2nd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ld benefit is one direct means our government is using to address this issue by directing it at the families who need it the most. It is non-stigmatizing, portable, and progressive, which means that t...”

Mr. Darrell Samson (Sackville—Preston—Chezzetcook, Lib.)

November 2nd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...n support them. An important part are town halls and meetings with various legion members and their families. Many of them are also military members or veterans.

I am happy to mention that a couple of months ago I was appointed to the veterans committee. It is very important to me and I am very happy to be taking part in it.

In my riding we have many seniors. We hold a lot of records for the number of veterans and seniors. From 2011 to 2016, we had a 33% increase of seniors, the greatest in the country for those 65 years and older. That identifies the need to support our seniors.

In our riding, while the number of seniors over the last five years has increased, the numbers of youths have decreased by about 5%. That is not a good formula. We have to make things happen. I strongly believe that this budget will allow us to do that.

Also in my riding are a lot of young families with many young kids. We need to create infrastructure to allow us to support those individuals.

It is extremely important to talk about our veterans. Many things are happening, although more needs to be done. This morning I met with the ombudsman of veterans affairs and the ombudsman of the Canadian Armed Forces. We now have an opportunity to drill deeper on some of the issues.

One thing our government has promised, and we will fulfill, is a lifetime pension. The details, as we indicated in the budget, are being worked out. We hope to launch it before the end of the year.

The other piece about veterans is their transition after release. It is probably the most difficult and challenging piece. Our government has already done many good things in this area, but we need to do a lot more. We need to make sure that it is a seamless process for a military member who is being released for whatever reason. Whether it is for medical reasons or not, we must make sure that we do it right.

We are not doing it right. Approximately 10,000 military members are released each year, and 27% of them have challenges transitioning. More importantly, 60% of that 27% are not on medical release. We have a lot of work to do in this area and we will be concentrating a lot of our energies here.

The government has put an educational component in place with respect to the military. When veterans are released after six years they will receive $40,000 for transition and rehabilitation, and after 12 years they will receive $80,000. Those represent investments in creating that transition that is so important, and we have so much more to do.

We have also invested in family resource centres. It is crucial for more interventions in the short term to support our veterans.

The federal government cannot solve it all. The provincial government and the municipal government also have some responsibility. They are on the ground. The family well-being fund brings veterans into the community. This allows different organizations to apply for funding for services in their communities for veterans. That is extremely important. (1200)

The other one, of course, is the centre of excellence we have talked about for PTSD and medical issues. We need to do more in that area, and we need to do it quickly. We have committed to that type of centre. What is the centre? It cannot be just bricks and mortar. There have to be services. We have to keep data and have tracking. We have to know what is happening in other countries so that we can take best practices and apply them here.

We just announced the joint suicide prevention initiative, which is another great example of our government taking a horizontal approach to supporting our military and veterans. We have the Minister of National Defence and the Minister of Veterans Affairs working together to tighten the seamless approach we want.

The second piece I want to talk about is seniors. I spent a lot of time this summer visiting every seniors residence in my riding talking about some of the services and what we are trying to do. We have already changed the retirement age to 65. Some of them are now seniors and are recognized as seniors, whereas under the former government, they were not. We know that is extremely important as well.

We also put in place for seniors compassionate care benefits. Any family member or relation of someone who has a terminal illness can apply for extra weeks of compassionate care benefits. It has gone from six weeks to 26 weeks, which is extremely important.

The accessibility tax credit is another one that is extremely important. If we want people to stay in their homes longer, we may have to make some adjustments. I am sure some members have seen the television ads about the chair that goes upstairs. That is an example. We have to do all kinds of different things structurally to make sure people can stay in their homes longer. The national housing strategy will also greatly help seniors. The investment in the national health care program is another one that will assist in that area.

The third point I want to talk about is youth. As I said before, we have fewer youth in my riding than five years ago. We need to change that trend. Last year I had a youth council, and I will continue that this year. It is an opportunity for them to help us as a government, to help us as MPs, understand some of their needs.

We have put in place the working income tax benefit for those families making low incomes. They can use that money for education. We have created an employment strategy that will help 33,000 youth develop job skills and will create 15,000 green jobs. We have doubled the number of summer jobs in the last two years for young people.

I cannot leave without talking about the CCB. All of us in this chamber, all 338 MPs, have families in their ridings that have received extra funding to use for education, sports, and all kinds of challenges these families have. In my riding alone, Sackville—Preston—Chezzetcook, the families of more than15,000 kids are receiving money tax-free. That is a major investment. I am hearing that at the door. Nine out of 10 families across this country are receiving more money; 300,000 kids are now out of poverty. That is ...”

Mr. Tom Kmiec (Calgary Shepard, CPC)

November 2nd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...erta.

Who are the victims of these types of government decisions on that side? Alberta energy families are the victims of this decision to finance infrastructure projects, pipelines overseas in Asia, helping middle-class Chinese workers and middle-class Bangladeshi workers, instead of Canadian middle-class workers. That is shameful. They are the victims of this type of decision-making.

It goes on. Those are not the only countries. We have to look at it more broadly as well. Speaking of Canada's foreign interests, what kind of interests could we possibly have in financing this bank with half a billion dollars? Let us look at it.

Our ally Japan, with whom we would like to have a better relationship and a free trade agreement, heads up the Asian Development Bank. Do we choose to go there? No, we are going to go to the bank controlled by the biggest shareholder, the Chinese Communist Party, where a 76% vote is necessary to approve a project and where the Chinese government holds the biggest stake. It has been said that it is not a multilateral bank but a vehicle to pursue China's interests. Why are we financing China's foreign policy?

It has been said of the appointment process at the AIIB, which is the acronym for this bank, when compared to the World Bank, when compared to Japan's ADB, the development bank I just spoke of, that China has veto power over the appointment of the AIIB president. That type of influence does not exist at these other multilateral bodies of which Canada is a part.

I have to ask this question. Why are we giving away half a billion dollars of middle-class Canadian taxpayers' dollars? We taxed people in Alberta, people who did not have jobs, energy families, convenience store workers, restaurant workers, to then give the money to middle-class workers in China to literally build a pipeline over there. These projects have been approved over there.

We crow about projects being approved here, but in this budget the government is going after the energy industry again. It is repealing one of the tax credits that the energy industry uses. It is in subclause 19(1) of this budget implementation legislation. The government is phasing out the first $1 million and no longer will the CDE be able to be reclassified into a CEE.

This is another kick in the shins to energy families. It is a kick in the shins to Albertans, who are the victims in all this. They are the ones...”

Mr. Gérard Deltell (Louis-Saint-Laurent, CPC)

November 2nd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... that is not true. Just one month ago, the Fraser Institute released a study indicating that 80% of families pay $840 more in taxes today due to this government's bad decisions.

Not only will the soon to be implemented carbon tax result in higher taxes for Canadians, but the tax credits introduced by our government were abolished. The first on the government's chopping block were the family tax credits, including credits for children's sports and arts activities. It also eliminated the tax credit for the purchase of textbooks.

It even eliminated a green credit introduced by the Conservatives. The late Hon. Jim Flaherty, a former Conservative finance minister, introduced a tax credit for users of public transit. It was an effective way of encouraging and helping people to use public transit in their community. The Liberals, who continually boast about being environmentally friendly, eliminated the public transit credit. (1230)

Over the past few months, we learned that the government wanted to attack the most vulnerable and most disadvantaged among us: the sick. It decided to impose stricter eligibility criteria for the tax credit for people with diabetes or mental illness. It is despicable for a government to go after sick people.

Our government created a tax credit to help people suffering from type 1 diabetes. Earlier, an NDP member was talking about his wife who has diabetes. We know it costs a lot of money, around $15,000 a year. Our government created a tax credit to help those people, give them some breathing room, and ease their suffering. This government is making the eligibility criteria stricter.

When we were in power, 80% of the people who applied for the tax credit got it. Today, under the Liberals, 80% of people who apply for it do not get it. Attacking the sick is unbecoming of a government and that is what the Liberal Party is doing.

These people crow over their lofty principles as they claim to have created the Canada child benefit to help children. The Prime Minister takes the floor every day. Yesterday, it was funny, he was so proud to be providing numbers. He talked about the number of children in the ridings of Richmond—Arthabaska and Glengarry—Prescott—Russell, as if he himself had invented family allowances.

Remember that this government implemented a new system, the Canada child benefit, but they forgot a small detail in the budget: inflation. They forgot to calculate inflation. That meant that in the end, Canadians were going to have less money in their pockets than they had under our program, the universal child care benefit. Each had their own point of view and their own game plan. We supported children.

The Prime Minister rises in the House to say that 23,283 children today receive such and such amount. However, children also benefited from our measures when we were in power. The big difference is that we had a balanced budget, which is not currently the case with the Liberals.

When we run a deficit, we are forcing our children and grandchildren to pick up the tab. Sure, this is a family-friendly measure designed to help children. I hope it helps them, anyway, because they are going to have to pay for it later thanks to a Liberal government that cannot balance the budget. This government may be focused on families and children, but it is also making them foot the bill.

I also remember the Liberals promising to change the tax system and make the rich pay more. They were going to be like Robin Hood, robbing from the rich and redistributing that wealth to the least fortunate among us. That is what the Liberal government said it would do. Two years on, what do we see? The exact opposite has happened.

As we said earlier, 80% of families are paying $840 more to the Liberal government. The richest Canadians were supposed to pay ...”

Mr. Chandra Arya (Nepean, Lib.)

November 2nd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...at was taxable. Under the Canada child benefit, we are giving more tax-free money to nine out of 10 families than the previous government did. The member also mentioned that we had not considered infl...”

Mr. Gérard Deltell

November 2nd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...pleased to read the document I am holding.

This Fraser Institute document reports that 80% of families are paying $840 more with the Liberals in power. That is the reality. The member spoke abou...”

Mr. Gérard Deltell

November 2nd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... was to let people decide for themselves. This was why we had so many tax credits to help children, families, and those who used transit, those who used buses and metros in big cities. If they wanted ...”

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.)

November 2nd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...edicated to helping some of the most vulnerable and to making life a little easier for middle-class families and those working hard to join them. This is an example of our government listening to Canadians.

This past summer I had an opportunity to participate in a fundraiser run by the YWCA Niagara Region. Prior to that fundraiser, it invited me back to the cardboard house, which was in the Pen Centre, a local mall in St. Catharines. I looked back again through the statistics, and many of them were too high. A lot more work needs to be done. The one statistic that caught my eye was that child poverty in Niagara was no longer 25% but 15%. As I said, that number is still too high, but it is a 40% reduction in child poverty in St. Catharines and the Niagara region within two years. We cannot argue with statistics. It's basic math: the more money we put into the hands of middle-class families and of those who are struggling, the more we reduce poverty. This is the result we get when we listen to Canadians and put in place a plan that is in the best interests of the country.

Reducing poverty and bolstering the middle class was a central tenet of our plan. It was at the core of budget 2016 and continues to be a core guiding principle of budget 2017 and the budget implementation act we are debating today. We do not have to look far to see supportive statements indicating that our plan is working, but I think one supportive statement in particular bears discussion. The Governor of the Bank of Canada is responsible for setting the monetary policy of our central bank. His job is essential to the successful operation of our economy, and his opinion holds enough weight to shift the entire stock market. He is independent, but was appointed on the advice of the former government. During his remarks of July 12, he noted that our economy was strengthening and the economic outlook strong. However, it is interesting to see his reasons for making those remarks. He credited our government's commitment to targeted stimulus spending as the reason for continued growth in our economy. He noted specifically that the Canada child benefit was “highly stimulative”. (1300)

We cannot ask for much more validation than that. The Bank of Canada governor, appointed by the previous Conservative prime minister, has credited our plan for growing the economy, which is exactly what we said it would do.

Perhaps the opinion of the Bank of Canada governor is not enough, so let us hear from Greg from St. Catharines.

I ran into Greg on the streets of St. Catharines. He said hello to me and said “Thank you, Chris.” I was perplexed by that and asked why he had said that. He told me that it was because of the Canada child benefit.

Greg's daughter and grandson live with him. While his daughter works, he takes the opportunity to spend a lot of time with his grandson. It is evident the money his daughter receives from the Canada child benefit makes life easier for the entire household. They have more money for groceries, activities, making things just a little easier day by day. These are real constituents benefiting from our plan.

If the governor's comment and Greg's story are not enough, perhaps we should talk about Laura.

Laura is a a single mom in St. Catharines. She works full time, but despite working full time and being a single mom, she gives a lot back to the community. As many parents can attest to, life is hard enough when they have kids. Obviously, as we have talked about on all sides, it is more difficult when there is just one parent. However, for all the single parents out there, life is not always so easy. The CCB helps supplement her income, allowing her to put money where it needs to go, allowing kids to be kids, to play sports, and enjoy outing with friends.

Again, the proof is in the testimonials, and the proof is crystal clear that our plan is working. Bill C-63, which would implement the next phase of budget 2017, will continue to improve the lives of everyday Canadians.

I want to turn for a moment to talk about poverty on a wider scale.

Last week, the finance minister tabled the fall economic update, which included further measures to boost the Canada child benefit. This will continue to contribute positive results to the economy.

However, the minister also made note of a new commitment to the working income tax benefit. Addressing poverty on a wide scale requires addressing the core of the problem. While it was announced that 450,000 new jobs were created since late 2015 and we had the strongest economy in the G7, we must dedicate resources to those Canadians who are down on their luck and need help. The working income tax benefit does just that.

Utilized as a refundable tax credit, the working income tax benefit provides important income support, helping supplement the income of low-income earners. By allowing low-income workers to keep more of their paycheques, the benefit encourages people to enter the workforce and allows them to establish a level of stability, decrease their need for social assistance, and to get back on their feet to break the cycle of poverty.

This has been our goal since the election, advancing an agenda that would serve to expand the middle class and make the lives of Canadians families a little easier.

To recap, today we are debating legislation that would implement the next phase. Our CCB has been successful in its intent to reduce poverty of over 300,000 children. We have witnessed the impact it is having on middle-class families and, as such, we have committed to bolstering it further by tying it to inflation a year ea...”

Mr. Garnett Genuis

November 2nd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...udget implementation act. I certainly would take issue with the government's policy with respect to families and I disagree with the member's statement about their impact. However, of course I cannot ...”

Mr. Steven MacKinnon (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Public Services and Procurement, Lib.)

November 2nd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...nment's wider plan to promote greater work-life balance. It will also help ease the burden of young families and our families in general. This is a well represented group in my riding of Gatineau. A recent study found that the population of Gatineau is younger, and that its income and rate of growth is higher than the Quebec average. The riding's people work hard and have helped build Canada through their participation in the federal public service. The people of Gatineau have worked hard in the forestry and resource sectors. They have created wealth. My constituents work, and most importantly, live and raise their families in the riding of Gatineau.

Our government's efforts and policies are appropriate for the people of my riding and have a positive impact on the citizens of Gatineau. It is very difficult to achieve work-life balance today. There are problems with transportation, and there is stress. Even with two incomes, our families' debt levels are higher than the national average. The government must take action.

Our election platform and the bill before us today are meant to ease this burden. I would remind the House that we cut taxes for the middle class. When we talk about the middle class, this includes the people of Gatineau. One of the first things we did was to cut taxes for the middle class. We dropped the retirement age. Mr. Harper wanted to raise the eligibility age for retirement to 67, but we brought it back down to 65.

As the Prime Minister said yesterday, the Canada child benefit and the enhancement we just announced in the fall economic update will help all Canadian families. It will give them room to make some choices, whether regarding child care, registration in cultural activities, leisure activities, and so on. The Canada child benefit is the most important social program of my generation for future generations, for the families and children in Gatineau and across Canada.

We enhanced the Canada pension plan. I applaud the Quebec finance minister' initiative, which will adapt the Canadian reform to Quebec society. The Canada pension plan will get a boost from coast to coast thanks to the federal government's efforts. This means that young workers and young families can rest assured that they will have a better and more secure retirement. What they save now will be returned to them at the end of their working lives. (1345)

Of course, there is also the working income tax benefit. Just like everywhere else, some people have trouble getting off social assistance. They find it difficult to choose between getting back into the job market and continuing to receive social assistance. Thanks to measures we just announced, this tax credit will be enhanced, which will make it easier for people to choose to go back to work and contribute more to society because they know they will get a tax credit, they know the government supports them, and they know that, financially, going back to work makes sense.

The bill we are talking about today will make life easier for people working in federally regulated industries. There will be more flexibility around vacation and annual leave. People will have up to 10 days of bereavement leave if they lose a loved one, and they will have an additional three days of unpaid leave to attend to family responsibilities. That is one way we are showing compassion for our workers and for people who are having a hard time balancing work and family responsibilities. Those responsibilities can be toward our parents, our children, or even ourselves. We have introduced important measures.

Our government will continue to make life easier for Canadian families. It will also continue to make it easier to raise a family and to deal with the stress associated with two incomes, the stress caused by personal debt, and the stress caused by job insecurity in our country.

We are well aware of these realities in Gatineau and elsewhere. As the member for Gatineau, I will continue to urge my government to take action and do what is necessary to help families in Gatineau and Quebec find work-life balance.

I will close on a more personal note. ...”

Mr. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, CPC)

November 2nd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“Madam Speaker, the member opposite talked about wanting to lessen the stress on middle-income families. One thing this bill will absolutely do, and the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of...”

Mr. Garnett Genuis (Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan, CPC)

November 2nd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...reasing taxes precisely on the groups it talks about helping.

When we talk about children and families, I want to very quickly ask the member this. Does he think it is fair to the next generatio...”

Mr. Robert Kitchen (Souris—Moose Mountain, CPC)

November 2nd
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...to do whatever possible to make this happen, as these incredible athletes, coaches, volunteers, and families provide a tremendous benefit for all Canadians.

I am so proud of all those who partic...”

Mr. John Brassard (Barrie—Innisfil, CPC)

November 2nd
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“... including a father of nine from North Bay.

I trust I speak for all members when I say to the families who have lost loved ones or those who were injured to please know they have our deepest sym...”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

November 2nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... for their parents, it is intensely personal. They care about our country and they care about their families.

We will not play the games of the opposition. We are going to work on behalf of Cana...”

Hon. Bill Morneau

November 2nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ived the Canada child benefit, an average of $700 per family, it is not a game. It is helping their families. That is what we are working to do, and we will continue to do so.”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

November 2nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...hat we would focus on them, and not focus on playing games that are not to their advantage or their families' advantage. Happily for them, our country is in a much better situation with higher growth and a better situation for their families across this country.

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

November 2nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...w we get to do the important work for Canadians. This really is not a game. It is very important to families across the country.”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

November 2nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...r, thinking about counting for the member for Milton, there are 25,630 children in her riding whose families are getting on average $520 more through the Canada child benefit. Those are the numbers th...”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

November 2nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...he Ethics Commissioner. We believe that is important. It is important also to focus on how Canadian families are feeling right now. They are seeing the highest growth rate they have seen in a decade. ...”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

November 2nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, our strategy is to continue improving the lives of Canadian families and the middle class across the country. That is what matters. That is why we introduced th...”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

November 2nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...he Canada child benefit, an average of $430 per family, we are proud that we are able to help those families.”

Hon. Bill Morneau

November 2nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...e in our economy. We have seen, in two years, a very positive change for middle-class Canadians and families across our country. That is what we are here to do, so we will continue to do the good work...”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

November 2nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...a child benefit, on average $520 per family. This is what we are doing for Canadians. We are making families better off so that they can actually move forward, to have confidence—”

Mr. Darrell Samson (Sackville—Preston—Chezzetcook, Lib.)

November 1st
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...s produce from the Sackville Community Food Garden.

This was the first season for the garden. Families have been using it to grow their own fruits and vegetables, all while contributing towards ...”

Hon. Erin O'Toole (Durham, CPC)

November 1st
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“... opposition and all Canadians were horrified by the attack yesterday.

Our hearts are with the families of the eight people killed in that terror attack. Our prayers are with the families of 11 people injured in that senseless act of violence. It was a violent attack in the name...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

November 1st
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... month tax free, because the Conservatives chose to send those child benefit cheques to millionaire families and we send them to the people who actually need them. The economic growth we have seen in ...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

November 1st
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ing have been receiving an average of $430 per family a month to help with the high cost of raising families, of buying new clothes, and after-school activities. These are the things that are making a difference for families in his riding, that we have increased because, unlike the former government, we do not—”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

November 1st
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...-working Canadians have.

We are always looking for ways to continue to help workers and their families and prepare them for their retirement. That is what we are going to continue to do. This go...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

November 1st
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ivered Canada child benefits that went to every family across the country, including the wealthiest families. We did not think that was fair, and we got a lot of grief from the Conservatives who disagreed with us on that.

We think doing more for the families that need it and less for the families that do not is a way of growing the economy. It worked. The Canada child benefit, lowering ...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

November 1st
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ding who are doing better because of the Canada child benefit. This is an average monthly cheque to families of $540. This money is being delivered to those families.

The Conservatives gave cheques to everyone. We are giving them to those who need it ...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

November 1st
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...dle class and raising them on the wealthiest 1% or delivering the Canada child benefit, which helps families directly, including in North Island—Powell River where 14,350 young people will be receiving larger cheques every month. It will help with the high cost of raising families. This is a $600 cheque, on average, to families every month, and it is making a real difference for the folks in the member's riding.”

Ms. Marilyn Gladu (Sarnia—Lambton, CPC)

November 1st
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...mental health issues are the latest victims of a clampdown on access to the disability tax credit”. Families I met with told me how the Liberals had taken thousands of dollars from RDSPs used for savi...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

November 1st
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...lp. That is why our government has always taken a compassionate approach and helped individuals and families in need.

The hon. member for Mégantic—L'Érable will be pleased to know that in his ri...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

November 1st
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, we believe in real collaboration to support families, to build sustainable communities, and to create robust economies.

We are committed t...”

Mr. Garnett Genuis (Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan, CPC)

November 1st
Hansard Link

Routine Proceedings

“...ns. They write that the government's elimination of the family tax credit has stripped thousands of families of a much-needed tax break and that it is imperative that the family tax credit, or a simil...”

Mr. Alupa Clarke (Beauport—Limoilou, CPC)

October 31st
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ty of Quebec for sending buses as quickly as possible. My thoughts are with these seniors and their families in these difficult times. I hope that most of them have family who can take them in. I have...”

Mr. Rhéal Fortin (Rivière-du-Nord, BQ)

October 31st
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...Elliott Trudeau invoked the War Measures Act and had 500 innocent people arrested in front of their families, people like Gérald Godin, a humanist if ever there was one, the epitome of an open and mod...”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

October 31st
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...nd that our economy is doing well and that people in their ridings are finding themselves and their families in a better situation. That is what we are going to continue to focus on. That is what we w...”

Ms. Sonia Sidhu (Brampton South, Lib.)

October 31st
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...House today to acknowledge and recognize the profound impact this disease has on patients and their families.

In addition to supporting programs that prevent diabetes, including healthy eating a...”

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Development, Lib.)

October 30th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“Mr. Speaker, I thank the minister for the bill. I know families in my riding of Whitby will appreciate the passenger bill of rights, particularly with rece...”

Mr. Wayne Stetski (Kootenay—Columbia, NDP)

October 30th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...dents living near the arena were evacuated from their homes for five days. My heart goes out to the families of the workers who died and to the citizens of Fernie.

It is estimated that there are...”

Mr. Bernard Généreux (Montmagny—L'Islet—Kamouraska—Rivière-du-Loup, CPC)

October 30th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...rothers Gervais and Jean-Guy Pelletier, who run Pellerat Farm in Saint-Roch-des-Aulnaies with their families, took home top honours in the 128th edition of Quebec's national order of agricultural meri...”

Mr. Raj Grewal (Brampton East, Lib.)

October 30th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...e still not been brought to justice. Mothers lost sons, gurdwaras were burned down, and entire Sikh families were wiped out.

Acknowledging the malicious intent underlying the massacre is the fir...”

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.)

October 30th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...ognize the Pink Ladoo Project and its volunteers, such as Harbir Singh. The organization encourages families to stand up against sexist customs by sharing examples of those who already have. The stori...”

Mr. Murray Rankin (Victoria, NDP)

October 30th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...tive services takes a great deal of effort, so let us thank the volunteers, the veterans, and their families. This year, I will not be able to attend Remembrance Day services with my legion friends. I...”

Ms. Rachel Blaney (North Island—Powell River, NDP)

October 30th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ing many medium-sized and rural communities, air transportation provides a vital link that connects families and communities and promotes economic growth.

As a representative of the third larges...”

Ms. Irene Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe, NDP)

October 30th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ted to the cancellation of rail services across the country.

Canada has a growing population, families with children, disabled Canadians, and senior citizens who need to travel. At the same time...”

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada, Lib.)

October 27th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...after consuming alcohol or drugs. I am continually frustrated and deeply saddened by the stories of families who have lost loved ones as a result of impaired driving. Mothers and fathers should no lon...”

Hon. Steven Blaney (Bellechasse—Les Etchemins—Lévis, CPC)

October 27th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“Madam Speaker, an important witness that the minister did not hear from in committee is Families For Justice.

Families For Justice is a group of traffic accident victims. They want a deterrent. They want the government to send a strong message that Canada does not tolerate impaired driving. One way of doing that is to impose a minimum sentence of five years for impaired driving causing death. We can see that this works as a deterrent since the prison population is decreasing.

Why did the minister not listen to Families for Justice and implement a five-year minimum sentence for impaired driving causing death?<...”

Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould

October 27th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... the opportunity to work with him.

I have had the opportunity to meet with several members of Families for Justice. I would like to acknowledge the significant loss they have suffered and recogn...”

Mr. Pierre Paul-Hus (Charlesbourg—Haute-Saint-Charles, CPC)

October 27th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...estroy anyone and everyone who does not share their ideology. These men promote hatred within their families and in public. How is it possible that these criminals are allowed to return to Canada and ...”

Mrs. Sherry Romanado (Longueuil—Charles-LeMoyne, Lib.)

October 27th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...n and women who made the ultimate sacrifice, the men and women who serve our country today, and the families who serve alongside them.[English]

This year again I will be supporting my local legion by volunteering at the poppy drive and taking part in various Remembrance Day events. I urge every member of the House to do the same. The funds raised through the poppy campaign help the Royal Canadian Legion continue the great work that it does. I encourage all Canadians to proudly wear their poppies over their hearts as a visual pledge to never forget.

I speak on behalf of my fellow military families. (1110) [Translation]

We will remember them.”

Mr. Joël Lightbound (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance, Lib.)

October 27th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...te, we are lowering taxes for nine million Canadians. We are giving more to nine out of 10 Canadian families, on average $2,300. That is how—”

Hon. Navdeep Bains (Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development, Lib.)

October 27th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... why we enhanced and strengthened the Canada pension plan.

With regards to the challenges the families are facing at Sears Canada, we understand how difficult this is for the workers, their families, and the many communities involved. That is why, through Service Canada, we have engaged wi...”

Mr. Jonathan Wilkinson (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Lib.)

October 27th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...upport local action at the community level to help fight climate change and to ensure that Canadian families enjoy a clean and healthy environment, including project like the pollinator gardens being ...”

Mr. Kelly McCauley (Edmonton West, CPC)

October 27th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ed to take from the government before it will realize that its endless taxation is hurting Canadian families?”

Hon. Marc Garneau (Minister of Transport, Lib.)

October 27th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Madam Speaker, I thank my colleague for his question.

As always, our thoughts are with the families and friends of the victims of the Lac-Mégantic disaster. I want to assure the people of Lac...”

Mr. Darren Fisher

October 27th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...know what sickle cell disease is. It is a disease affecting approximately 5,000 Canadians and their families. The number of Canadians diagnosed with the disease continues to increase. The Sickle Cell Disease Association of Canada now estimates that one out of every 2,500 children will be born with this disease.

Sickle cell is the most common genetic disease in the world. Sickle cell refers to the presence of abnormal hemoglobin resulting in crescent-shaped red blood cells. Unlike normal, doughnut-shaped red blood cells, sickle cells struggle to move easily throughout the body's circulatory system, and struggle to deliver oxygen to the organs. Sickle cells have a very limited lifespan compared to healthy red blood cells. The diseased sickle cells become stiff and break apart as they die, clogging the vessels and starving the body's ability to deliver oxygen to the organs. As the organs are starved for oxygen, patients experience extreme pain, especially in their bones.

I was reading an anonymous Q and A with sickle cell patients the other day where one participant, a young person, explained the nature of sickle cell pain so vividly. It really put the nature of the illness into perspective and I am going to share it now.

This person said, “You know the way the sky and the atmosphere changes gradually just before a major storm? That's how I feel my body changing just before an onset of pain crisis. It sucks knowing that it's coming and there's nothing you can do about it. When the pain hits you it takes everything away from you—you have no thoughts, desires, knowledge of anything, everything within you is focussed on trying to get rid of the pain. Then the pain takes over. Completely. It might just be your arm, or your feet, or hips, or chest, but it chokes the life out of you, literally... The strongest painkillers don't really “kill” the pain—it only keeps it at bay and temporarily stops it from choking the life out of you. I am sure you've noticed the labored breathing just before the pain relievers take effect. It's not for show. You struggle to breathe, to live.” (1315)

Most of these people are experiencing lifelong debilitating pain. Some people affected by sickle cell anemia are confined to their homes, requiring around-the-clock care. Many folks with sickle cell are receiving regular blood transfusions and are taking pharmaceuticals to manage chronic pain. Numerous blood transfusions are not uncommon for someone with this disease. This speaks to the importance of donating blood. Canadian Blood Services calls donating blood “giving the gift of life”, and it could not be truer. By donating blood, we could be giving someone who suffers with sickle cell disease a longer lifespan.

This disease primarily affects those with diverse ethnic backgrounds: African, Caribbean, Mediterranean, Middle Eastern, South American, and South Asian. In Canada, sickle cell disproportionately affects members of the African Canadian community.

Some time ago, I met with the Black Health Alliance and learned that black people were overrepresented among people with illness. I learned that discrimination could be one of the major reasons why sickle cell anemia lacked awareness. That lack of awareness results in individuals being underserved by the medical community.

I have heard loud and clear from folks, like my friend Rugi Jalloh, president of the Sickle Cell Disease Association of Nova Scotia, of the discrimination those patients with this disease experience. This disease can be debilitating and obvious, or debilitating and hidden.

These are folks like 16-year old Canadian Adeniyi Omishore, who says, “This disease is very limiting and many on the street look at me weirdly....Some kids in school even make fun of me.” Contrast that with this anonymous statement by a Canadian sickle cell disease patient who said, “A good hospital stay is whenever I'm not perceived as a drug seeker/junkie. A 20 year old black kid asking for heavy doses of narcotics always triggers an alarm. I've been refused care many times because of this.”

This shows the importance of increasing sickle cell disease awareness across our country, awareness for all health care providers to recognize and understand this disease, and the importance of recognizing discrimination and how it affects people with sickle cell. Time and again, when learning about this disease, I have heard that folks have gone to the hospital for care only to be turned away and treated as junkies looking for a fix. For someone to be turned away at the emergency room because he or she may appear to be an addict and not someone in major pain, we must do better. There are organizations across the country working hard to raise awareness.

The Sickle Cell Disease Association of Canada remains focused on building awareness of sickle cell disease. It is working to enhance methods of identification, diagnosis and treatment. It also partners with universities and researchers to help toward a cure.

The Sickle Cell Foundation of Alberta is doing great work by helping patients deal with the condition and helping improve their quality of life.

The Sickle Cell Anemia Association of Quebec is working to raise awareness among at-risk groups of this disease. It is promoting research and education, and working to support sufferers and their families.

The Sickle Cell Association of BC, led by Adobie McAllister, is working on an education handbook for sickle cell patients to help better inform them of treatments and to help handle their concerns.

The Sickle Cell Association of Ontario has educated the community about sickle cell and aims to reduce the incidence of sickle cell within at-risk communities. Its initiative on poverty deserves recognition also as chronic illness and poverty often go hand in hand.

As I mentioned, in my home province of Nova Scotia, the Sickle Cell Association of Nova Scotia, led by Rugi Jalloh, is working hard to support individuals with sickle cell and their families financially and morally. I met with this society and I was blow away by its incredible advo...”

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Development, Lib.)

October 27th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...ng about this disease. (1355)

I am going to go back to the individuals, their caregivers and families living with this condition. I encourage people to use this day and every day to advocate, t...”

Mr. Bill Blair (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada and to the Minister of Health, Lib.)

October 27th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...peak about declaring a day of awareness, it is important to keep in mind those young kids and their families who have been affected by this disease and to remember those who are working tirelessly in our communities to make a difference and support them.

Because of the nature of these kids' illness and the way they suffer, they miss, on average, 50 days of school each year. They are unable to participate in many things most kids take for granted. To have the opportunity to spend time with each other and experience the fun of a summer camp with people who understand the limitations their health condition places on them is extraordinary. It is a great privilege for the House to have an opportunity to call on all Canadians to keep at the forefront of their thinking those children, their families, and those who support them.

Now I will go to my prepared remarks. We welcome the chance to add our voice in support of Bill S-211. I want to reassure Canadians living with sickle cell disease that the government and the people of Canada support them and have their backs. This act respecting national sickle cell awareness day is a testament to our national commitment to increase awareness of sickle cell disease and to improve diagnosis and treatment as we work to find a long-term cure for those affected by this disease.

Sickle cell disease is a devastating disease, as I said, that cannot be ignored. It is diagnosed more than 100 times each year in this country when a baby is born with this rare blood disorder. Those children join the other 5,000 Canadians already living with this disease and the hundreds of millions of people like them suffering around the world.

These are people who learn to cope with tremendous pain from a disease that, to date, has eluded a cure. The pain episodes they experience are due to bone marrow necrosis. These are people who suffer frequent painful attacks that send them to hospital for blood transfusions and drug therapies to manage their disease. They are far more susceptible to infection and have an increased risk of stroke and vision loss. Perhaps most alarming is that these people expect to live shorter lives than other Canadians, because sickle cell disease can lead to serious bacterial infections and tissue death, which can frequently result in an early death. Life expectancy is calculated to be 30 years less than it is for most Canadians. Aside from the terrible loss of loved ones, Canadian society as a whole is shortchanged when this happens. First and foremost, we lose the valuable contributions of these individuals to our economy and our communities. We also pay the high cost to cover their frequent stays in hospital, an average of $20,000 per week for a one-week stay, and there are generally many more weeks than one.

This does not begin to capture the debilitating impact this disease can have on those individuals living with sickle cell disease and their families and friends. Few of us can imagine how harrowing the diagnosis of sickle cell disease must be, yet it is a reality that a significant proportion of the population knows only too well. Approximately 5% of the world's population carries the gene for sickle cell, which means that it is bound to surface in some Canadian families and communities. (1405)

In fact, given Canada's multicultural composition, it is sad...”

Ms. Julie Dabrusin (Toronto—Danforth, Lib.)

October 26th
Hansard Link

Routine Proceedings

“...s for Child Care. They are seeking high quality, affordable child care and relief for middle-income families by raising the child care expenses deduction upper limit to $28,000 per year, which is in l...”

Mr. Gérard Deltell (Louis-Saint-Laurent, CPC)

October 26th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...One of the ministers I highly respect and personally like is the member for Québec, the Minister of Families. Yesterday, he and the Minister of Transport said that they should not meddle with Quebec's Bill 62, which is a brave and responsible position to take. As an aside, I would like to commend the member for Québec, the Minister of Families, and the Minister of Transport, both experienced government ministers, who said that this concerned Quebec and not Ottawa. That is what we Conservatives have been saying all along. However, I have to say that this is an important distinction in light of what thePrime Minister said yesterday about how this law makes no sense and so forth. However, oddly enough, a week earlier, before the by-election in Lac-Saint-Jean, he was saying that the provinces' jurisdictions had to be respected. I will now get back to the matter at hand.

The member for Québec and Minister of Families said in an interview that the Prime Minister had told him to just focus on families and not worry about Quebec, because he is not the minister for the Quebec region. This is outrageous. He may not be minister for the Quebec region, but he is their MP. Who will stand up for the Quebec region and the province of Quebec at the cabinet table, if the member for Québec is on the record as saying that the Prime Minister told him that is not his job and to just focus on families?

What is wrong with this government? This is an outrage. It is an insult to the memor...”

Mr. Jacques Gourde (Lévis—Lotbinière, CPC)

October 26th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... that we are.

Since this Liberal government took office, no one has been spared. The regions, families, companies and every sector of the economy are hurting. It is important to point that out. ...”

Mr. Don Davies (Vancouver Kingsway, NDP)

October 26th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...e a government that would bring policies forward that would actually help the millions of women and families on the ground in this country. The NDP has pushed for a policy of affordable child care, as...”

Mr. Tom Kmiec

October 26th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... but they want energy jobs, pipelines, and development of the oil sands. I come from a riding where families who live there work in the oil sands business. They work in energy, and really that is the ...”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

October 26th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...to get to the very important work we are doing on behalf of Canadians, making a real difference for families today and tomorrow.”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

October 26th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...e that is the best in a decade. What they have also seen is more jobs, more jobs for them and their families. The level of confidence in our country is going up. That is what is allowing us to continu...”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

October 26th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...e doing for Canadians, the work that we will continue, no matter what, making a real difference for families today. Things like the Canada child benefit and the working income tax benefit make a real ...”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

October 26th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... Canadians. We have been very clear: it is very important that we improve the situation of Canadian families. It is very important that we continue to have a very good level of growth. Those are our g...”

Mr. Kyle Peterson (Newmarket—Aurora, Lib.)

October 25th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...bers of the Canadian Armed Forces, veterans, and emergency first responders, and importantly, their families.

Cadence is a mental health service provider providing an innovative approach to heal...”

Mr. Raj Grewal (Brampton East, Lib.)

October 25th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...r, and it is strengthening the Canada child benefit by providing more after-tax dollars to Canadian families. We are also reducing the small business tax rate from 11% to nine per cent.

We are n...”

Mr. Pierre Breton (Shefford, Lib.)

October 25th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...rk of a group of volunteers who have dedicated themselves to helping people with epilepsy and their families for the past three decades.

Épilepsie Montérégie is celebrating its 30th anniversary ...”

Mr. Glen Motz (Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner, CPC)

October 25th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...h sides of the aisle. I stand by my election promise to be a tireless advocate for the hard-working families, farmers, and small businesses in my southern Alberta riding. Sectors like agriculture and ...”

Mr. Anthony Housefather (Mount Royal, Lib.)

October 25th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...eal's Jewish community.

Founded originally by English Jews from the Sephardic community whose families originated in Spain and Portugal, today it is one of Montreal's most diverse synagogues, serving Canadian Jewish families who can trace their origins back to almost every country in the world where Jews have lived...”

Ms. Jennifer O'Connell (Pickering—Uxbridge, Lib.)

October 25th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“... Remembrance Day, and, indeed, every day to honour and remember the fallen and support the military families.”

Hon. Andrew Scheer (Leader of the Opposition, CPC)

October 25th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ent certainly has spent a lot of effort making sure that money is put in the pockets of billionaire families like the finance minister and his own family fortune. Yesterday, we saw the Prime Minister ...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

October 25th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... were talking with me were grateful for the Canada child benefit that helps nine out of 10 Canadian families, grateful that the first thing we did was lower taxes on the middle class and raise them on...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

October 25th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... raised them for the wealthiest 1%. He has put more money in the pockets of nine out of 10 Canadian families by delivering a Canada child benefit that is not only lifting hundreds of thousands of kids...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

October 25th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...re doing to protect forestry workers, about what we are delivering for agricultural communities and families, and about what we are delivering directly to Canadians and the nine out of 10 families who need help with the Canada child benefit.

These are the kinds of things that peopl...”

Mr. Gérard Deltell (Louis-Saint-Laurent, CPC)

October 25th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...at the Liberals are in power, and it is the finance minister who says so. Furthermore, middle-class families are paying $800 more because of this government. Even worse, the finance minister forgot to...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

October 25th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...rst thing we did. We then implemented the Canada child benefit, giving more money to nine out of 10 families without sending any child benefit cheques to millionaires, like the Conservatives did.

<...”

Mr. Charlie Angus (Timmins—James Bay, NDP)

October 25th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...incial foster care to get help. There is something fundamentally wrong in a nation where indigenous families have to give their children away, while we have a finance minister who cannot remember that...”

Mr. Sean Fraser (Central Nova, Lib.)

October 25th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...e government has a lot to be proud of, including the Canada child benefit. Under the Conservatives, families got the same whether they earned $25,000 a year or $2.5 million. That is not right.

Our government has stopped giving Canada child benefit cheques to millionaires, and gives more to 9 out of 10 Canadian families. As I hear jeers from across the aisle, I know this program is lifting 300,000 Canadian chi...”

Mr. Scott Duvall (Hamilton Mountain, NDP)

October 25th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... commit to changing bankruptcy and insolvency laws to protect Canadian workers, retirees, and their families, yes or no?”

Ms. Brigitte Sansoucy (Saint-Hyacinthe—Bagot, NDP)

October 25th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...uations of first nations, the working poor, children, unemployed workers, people with disabilities, families, and refugees in order to make them less vulnerable?”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

October 25th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...nefit is indexed to the cost of living. This will help put more much-needed money in the pockets of families in the coming years and reduce child poverty by 40%. We are also giving more assistance to ...”

Mr. Anthony Housefather (Mount Royal, Lib.)

October 24th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...rug-related offences on our roads. Too many Canadians die, too many Canadians are injured, too many families across the country are hurt every year because of impaired driving accidents. The crashes that ensue, because someone has consumed alcohol or drugs and taken to the road, are not acceptable under any circumstances.

If I were starting from scratch and writing alcohol-related legislation, there would be no tolerance whatsoever for anyone who is caught driving with alcohol or drugs in his or her system. Nobody can drive safely when marijuana or other drugs have been consumed, no matter how little. No one can drive safely when alcohol has been consumed, no matter how little.

It is true that due to the constraints of our testing, we cannot test at certain levels, which means we have to set per se limits. We need to have certain thresholds which one cannot pass in order to create an offence, in addition to when an officer suspects impairment. From my point of view, no Canadian should be driving if he or she has consumed drugs or alcohol.

I would like to talk about the two of the most contentious issues related to this legislation. Our committee held extended hearings. We sat for many hours over a period of two weeks and listened to witnesses from across the spectrum. The two areas about which I heard the most concern were mandatory screening and minimum mandatory sentences.

The constitutionality of mandatory screening was questioned, and I want to go back to the recent speech made by my colleague from Lethbridge. I thought it was very interesting to hear her question the constitutionality of minimum mandatory screening. I want to point out that she, along with most of her colleagues, voted in favour of the private member's bill of the member for Bellechasse—Les Etchemins—Lévis, Bill C-226, that was recently before the House. It proposed mandatory screening. I find it funny to hear the member question the constitutionality of mandatory screening when that was the entire premise of Bill C-226, which she voted in favour of earlier this year.

Why, despite constitutional questions raised, do I support mandatory screening? Because at committee we heard there was only one way to deter drunk driving, that there was only one way to deter drug-impaired driving. That was to scare people into really believing they would be caught. Minimum mandatory sentences and what will happen after the fact, will not deter people; it is the idea that police may actually catch them in the act.

At committee, we heard from witnesses from Colorado, Australia, and from other jurisdictions where mandatory screening was introduced. They told us that mandatory screening had a huge deterrent because of the heightened probability of being caught.

Since mandatory screening was introduced in Australia, Finland, Sweden, France, and Ireland, there was an incredible reduction in the number of deaths related to alcohol. In Finland, where mandatory screening was introduced in 1977, a study noted that the number of drivers impaired by alcohol had decreased by 58%. According to a report published in Ireland, deaths caused by impaired driving decreased 19% in the first year following mandatory screening.

We know that mandatory screening really works. It has been proven to work across the globe. Some groups, such as the Canadian Bar Association and the Barreau du Québec, asked questions about the way mandatory screening would work. At committee, we introduced a provision into the preamble of the bill to reassure Canadians that any check needed to be done in line with the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. (1040)

Police officers are able to do a lot of things when they make a legal stop, including asking someone for a breath test, under common law. We are now codifying what existed already under the common law. We are seeing that without reasonable suspicion, we can ask for a breath test, provided it was a lawful stop. The committee and all of us want to ensure we follow those rules and have asked, as part of this law, that the minister undertake a review of what has happened in three years to ensure mandatory screening is carried out properly.

Other measures and amendments on minimum mandatory sentences were introduced at committee. While I am very pleased that maximum sentences have increased for the very serious offences under the law, we did not introduce new minimum mandatory sentences. This was the one and only area where I saw divergence between ourselves and members of the official opposition.

The committee heard from groups, such as Mothers Against Drunk Driving, that there was no proof in any case that minimum mandatory sentences actually stopped people from driving impaired. When asked specifically, MADD stated that it did not favour increasing the minimum mandatory sentences that existed. However, I note that the committee, on an amendment from a Liberal member, reinserted minimum mandatory sentences in the one place it had been removed in the bill, which was for the most serious offence of driving while impaired causing bodily harm, and extended the maximum sentence.

I am not one of those people who believe there should never be minimum mandatory sentences. For the most serious offences, there needs to be minimum mandatory sentences. However, I also note that this has to come under a thorough review to determine exactly the right standards and the right duration of those sentences, because we also know there are drawbacks. When there is a minimum mandatory sentence, one does not plead out. People are very reluctant to plead out because they know they will go to prison for a certain minimum term. Therefore, it clogs the court system, which is already clogged, and causes difficulties under Jordan, where people are acquitted because they do not get a speedy enough trial.

We also know that minimum mandatory sentences are not really a deterrent. They do reassure families and victims, but they do not deter people from the behaviour. I would rather wait, before we change what the minimum mandatory sentences were, the committee having reinserted the exact same minimum mandatory sentences that exist now in law, to see what the review of the Minister of Justice has to say. Certain minimum mandatory sentences already in the Criminal Code have been found unconstitutional and others may need to be inserted. I would rather wait for a thorough review before changing them for impaired driving offences.

Finally, I want to thank the dozens of witnesses who appeared before committee. It was heart-wrenching to hear the testimony of parents who had lost children in impaired driving accidents. It was heart-wrenching to hear about the beautiful people whose lives were prematurely shortened and whose mothers would never become grandmothers, would never see their kids graduate from college, and would never see their kids have families of their own or have successful careers. It was awful. The people who came before committee to be heard deserve commendation. They chose not to just sit back and suffer, but to make changes to improve our laws, to fight to improve our laws to improve Canadian society. I want to herald the parents who had the courage to come before the committee. While they supported the thrust of the bill, I do not support their call for longer minimum mandatory sentences at this time.

From what I heard, we really need to work on what we do to help the victims their families. That issue of concern needs to be addressed. However, I support the thrust of the bill and...”

Mr. Mark Warawa (Langley—Aldergrove, CPC)

October 24th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...It suggested that impaired driving causing death be called what it is, vehicular homicide, and Families for Justice said it wanted mandatory minimums. They felt that, if someone knowingly drives a vehicle while impaired and kills someone, a first offence should be at least five years. Five years is actually one-third of that; it is about a year and a half. With statutory release, after one-third of a sentence people qualify to be released.

Families for Justice asked for five years. In the additional three and a half years after the initial one and half years of being locked up and receiving treatment and programs, people would be supervised to make sure they were not driving while impaired. It was very reasonable, and it is actually where Canadians are.

The last government said yes, and it introduced legislation. All the leaders running in the last election were asked if they would support the legislation, because there was not enough time to get it passed in the last Parliament. The Prime Minister wrote a letter to Markita Kaulius saying that he would support that.

Moving forward into this Parliament, that was another broken promise. The Prime Minister did not support that. There have been two pieces of legislation. One was a Conservative private member's bill, and one was a Liberal private member's bill. They were not good enough for him. He wanted to be in front, leading the parade on this, so those were shut down. We now have Bill C-46.

As per the promise the Prime Minister made to Markita Kaulius and to Families for Justice, in Bill C-46, there were to be mandatory minimum sentences. I was honoured to ...”

Mrs. Karen Vecchio (Elgin—Middlesex—London, CPC)

October 24th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...er very much for sharing that.

Today we are speaking about safe roads for Canadians and their families. It should be a simple discussion, but we must recognize that with the ramming through of t...”

Mrs. Karen Vecchio

October 24th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...rd the legislation? Why are we not getting all our ducks in a row so we can make sure that Canadian families are safe on our roads?”

Mr. Kevin Waugh (Saskatoon—Grasswood, CPC)

October 24th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... rates, if not the highest, of impaired driving in this country, as per Statistics Canada 2015, and families suffer as a result. I just talked about two of many families in my province. In 2016 alone, there were 6,377 incidents of impaired driving in our provin...”

Hon. Mike Lake (Edmonton—Wetaskiwin, CPC)

October 24th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...t has been an honour to serve alongside Greg, Camille, Bill, and John. May God bless them and their families as they embark on their next adventures.”

Mr. Rémi Massé (Avignon—La Mitis—Matane—Matapédia, Lib.)

October 24th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...right to vote, the foundation of our democracy.

Let us not forget the support we get from our families, who often make significant sacrifices to allow hon. members to defend the interests of the...”

Hon. Andrew Scheer (Leader of the Opposition, CPC)

October 24th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister keeps raising taxes on middle-class workers. Families are paying more for things like bus passes, their kids' sports, piano lessons, tuition, and...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

October 24th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ying what the Conservatives are selling. The Conservatives brought in tax credits that did not help families. What we introduced is a Canada child benefit that is giving more money to nine out of ten families and will lift over 300,000 children across Canada out of poverty. We will continue to keep our promises in order to create economic growth for families. That is what Canadians expect, and that is what we are doing.”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

October 24th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...hiest one per cent, to deliver a Canada child benefit that would grow the economy and help Canadian families right across the country, to strengthen the CPP, and to increase the guaranteed income supp...”

Hon. Diane Lebouthillier (Minister of National Revenue, Lib.)

October 24th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, I fully understand what diabetes can mean for diabetics and their families. As I was saying, my husband died of diabetes-related complications.

We worked with d...”

Mr. Garnett Genuis (Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan, CPC)

October 23rd
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...out at me from the last budget was that the Liberals had a program that proposed to help low-income families get access to the Internet, which is a legitimate objective with good intention. However, t...”

Mr. Joël Lightbound (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance, Lib.)

October 23rd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...e lifted hundreds of thousands of children out of poverty. Since July 2016, nine out of 10 Canadian families with children have received more in child benefits than they did under the previous system.

We also expanded the Canada pension plan to ensure that Canadians are better off financially in retirement. The strengthened CPP will provide more money to Canadians when they retire so they can worry less about their savings and focus more on enjoying time with their families. Strengthening the CPP will increase the maximum benefit by about 50% over time, giving ret...”

Mr. Gérard Deltell (Louis-Saint-Laurent, CPC)

October 23rd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...the job done.

Also, the Liberals cannot go 30 seconds without mentioning how they are helping families and the middle class, when that is not true at all. The Fraser Institute concluded that 80% of middle class families have been paying $840 a year more in taxes since the Liberals came to power. These people s...”

Ms. Iqra Khalid (Mississauga—Erin Mills, Lib.)

October 23rd
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...d its goals, raising 265,611 pounds of food and $225,409, enough to distribute food to over 880,000 families.

I want to thank Mayor Crombie for efforts, energy, and passion in building stronger ...”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

October 23rd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... my personal finances. I am going to continue to focus on the finances of Canadians and of Canadian families.

The work that we have been doing is making an enormous difference for Canadian families. We have seen, over the last quarter, 4.5% growth, hugely important for families. More importantly, what we have seen over the last year is 400,000 new jobs.

Canadians care about an economy that works for them and their families. We are going to stay focused on that.”

Hon. Diane Lebouthillier (Minister of National Revenue, Lib.)

October 23rd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...to which they are entitled.

I fully understand the concerns of people with diabetes and their families. My husband died of diabetes-related complications a few years ago.

We met with diabe...”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

October 23rd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...my personal finances, I am concerning myself with the financial situation of Canadians and Canadian families. That is what is important.

We currently have the highest economic growth rate in a decade. It is very important for Canadian families. Over the past year, we have created more than 400,000 new jobs. Things are going very well for Canadian families and that is what matters to me.”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

October 23rd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, Canadian families are a top priority for us, and it is our job to make life better for them.

Fortunately, things are better because of our policies. In just two years, we have achieved the highest levels of growth in the G7. Families are doing better because they have more money in their pockets now. That is better for them...”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

October 23rd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...I will also make sure that I focus on the goals that we have. We continue to work to make sure that families in Canada do well, that the middle class does well. Investing in middle-class Canadians helps them to have more money in their pockets, helps them to spend more on their families, and helps our economy to do well. That virtuous circle is what we are focused on. We know ...”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

October 23rd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...t we have made.

A couple of years ago, we told Canadians that we would invest in middle-class families. We told them that we would lower their taxes. We told them that we would increase their Canada child benefits. What we have seen is that in fact Canadian families are better off and our economy is better off. The best growth in a decade. The most new job...”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

October 23rd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... the beginning. We will continue with our policy and with our plan to improve the lives of Canadian families. We will have more to say tomorrow, but what I can say now is that our economy is in a very good position, and things are looking very good for Canadian families.”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

October 23rd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... What we are talking about is how the economy actually works. We know that by investing in Canadian families, by giving Canadian families more money, whether for healthier food or books for their kids, they can put money into the economy. What that does is improve our economy, helping those families not only today but tomorrow. Therefore, we will continue with our program, a program that i...”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

October 23rd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...Going forward, our top priority will be thinking about how we can make things better for Canadian families across the country. That is our goal.

Fortunately, two years into our government's mandate, Canada is doing great. We have a very high growth rate, there are more jobs for Canadians, and Canadian families are better off. That is still our goal.”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

October 23rd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...the people they voted for put in place programs that have made a real difference for them and their families. They have more money, which means they can spend more which has helped our economy to grow...”

Hon. Navdeep Bains (Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development, Lib.)

October 23rd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...is situation several times in the House and expressed our deep concern for the Sears workers, their families, and the many communities that have been impacted. That is why, as a government, we are working with Sears representatives to see them through this difficult time and provide assistance. Service Canada, for example, has been meeting with representatives of Sears Canada, and has held over 80 sessions. It continues to engage with the company.

With respect to the CCAA process, that matter is before the courts. We are monitoring the situation, and we will continue to work with the workers and their families.”

Hon. Navdeep Bains (Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development, Lib.)

October 23rd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...t is before the courts under the CCAA process, and we will continue to work with the workers, their families, and the many communities that are being impacted.”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

October 23rd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...o do is give more money to middle-class Canadians that will allow them to spend more money on their families and improve our economy in the short and the long term.

We are going to continue with...”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

October 23rd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...not actually focused on helping them. We immediately turned the channel on that approach by helping families with the Canada child benefit and by working to improve our economy. The good news is that ...”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

October 23rd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...now that the actions we have taken, the middle-class tax cut, the Canada child benefit, have helped families.

What we are going to be able to report on tomorrow is excellent news for Canadians. They made a great choice. They chose a team that has helped families, which is helping the economy, which is going to help their families and their future generation to do better.”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

October 23rd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...e finances of Canadians. That is very important. We will continue with our program to help Canadian families do better, and I can assure everyone that our program is working. We now have the highest l...”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

October 23rd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...good economic situation and for them to see they have the ability to invest in themselves and their families for today and tomorrow.

The programs we have put in place that have helped families, such as the Canada child benefit and a reduction in taxes for middle-class families, are working. Our economy is doing well. We have more jobs. That is the kind of confidence ...”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

October 23rd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...did not see in the years before we came into office, is really making a big difference for Canadian families, with new jobs, more money for them to invest in their families, and a better future for all of us.”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

October 23rd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...going to be so important for Canadians to have confidence in their futures and the futures of their families.”

Mr. Pierre-Luc Dusseault (Sherbrooke, NDP)

October 23rd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...r. Speaker, issues with the Phoenix pay system continue to plague thousands of employees, and their families as well.

In Sherbrooke, a brother and sister, both students, have been suffering the consequences of Phoenix every day since the death of their father, a former federal public servant. For the past year and a half, Mr. Fortin's children and their notary have been struggling with Phoenix issues that prevent them from settling the estate and dealing with their loss. It is completely unacceptable and inhuman for this kind of thing to happen to families because of the federal government's incompetence.

How much longer will Mr. Fortin's c...”

Hon. Carla Qualtrough (Minister of Public Services and Procurement, Lib.)

October 23rd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ossible is our priority. These issues have caused real hardships for many public servants and their families. They should not have to face this kind of situation. We will leave no stone unturned.”

Mr. Dean Allison

October 23rd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...The Conservatives care about young Canadians. Why do the Liberals see diabetic children and their families as tax targets?”

Mrs. Karen Vecchio (Elgin—Middlesex—London, CPC)

October 23rd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...mon? The Liberals have raised taxes on all of them.

Will the finance minister advise Canadian families how much money he has taken from hard-working families by increasing all these taxes?”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

October 23rd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ing the Canada child benefit, taking away cheques from those who did not need it and giving more to families who actually need it, we have given, on average, including all those issues we just heard brought up, $2,300 more per family after tax. It is a very good situation for Canadian families, which has led to a better economic outcome for our country.”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

October 23rd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... is what allows us to do the work that is so important for Canadians. That work is making sure that families feel better. They know that after 10 dark years, it is important to have people who are actually investing in their families so that they can actually do better so they can help their families succeed now and in the future. That is exactly what we have done.”

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.)

October 20th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...impact of the #MeToo hashtag.

Gillian's Place has served as a beacon of light for victims and families. It provides counselling, accommodation, and other countless services, giving those affecte...”

Mr. Jean Rioux (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Defence, Lib.)

October 20th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“... putting their own lives at risk. We are so grateful to them.

Today our thoughts are with the families, friends, and colleagues of Warrant Officer Vincent and Corporal Cirillo. Their bravery and...”

Mr. John Brassard (Barrie—Innisfil, CPC)

October 20th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“... Forces Covenant. The covenant passed in the U.K. Parliament states that those who serve, and their families, should face no disadvantage compared to other citizens in the provision of public and commercial services. It further states that special consideration is appropriate, especially for those who have given the most, such as the injured and bereaved.

Our Canadian Armed Forces sacrifice the same freedoms and face the same dangers. Our nation has a moral and sacred obligation to the members and families of the Canadian Armed Forces. They deserve our respect and the support of their government, understanding the uniqueness of what they and their families do for our country.

As former opposition critic for Veterans Affairs, I believe we ow...”

Ms. Hélène Laverdière (Laurier—Sainte-Marie, NDP)

October 20th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...or attack that struck last Saturday. Hospitals remain short of urgently needed medical supplies and families need more support. The world is responding with aid. The U.S., the European Union, Turkey, ...”

Hon. Navdeep Bains (Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development, Lib.)

October 20th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ne so several times.

We share the concerns that he has with respect to Sears employees, their families, and the many communities that have been impacted. That is why our government is trying to do everything we can to assist these workers during these difficult times. We have made every effort to connect Sears employees and pensioners with programs that will assist them. In particular, Service Canada has been meeting with representatives. It has had 80 sessions, and they are being delivered across the country.

We will continue to work with these Sears employees and their families to make sure that we assist them during this difficult time.”

Hon. Navdeep Bains (Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development, Lib.)

October 20th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... talking points when we talk about the employees. It is not talking points when we talk about their families. We sincerely mean this. That is why we are genuinely engaged with the Sears employees and their families to assist them during this difficult time.

We also believe in secure pensions. With respect to Sears, I understand that the current Sears Canada pension funds are held in trust and must be used solely for the benefit of the pensioners.

As the member opposite well knows, the CCAA process with regard to Sears is before the courts, and we are monitoring that situation as well. We will continue to assist the employees and their families.”

Hon. Seamus O'Regan (Minister of Veterans Affairs, Lib.)

October 20th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, certainly I give my condolences to the families involved. We cannot talk of specific cases out of respect for the privacy of the veteran and of the families involved, but there is no question that one suicide is one too many.

With the Minister of National Defence we have come forward with a joint suicide prevention strategy. We have hired 400 new frontline staff. We have reopened nine offices that were closed by the previous government. We have access to 4,000 mental health professionals and 11 operational stress injury clinics. We say to veterans and their families, if they need help, please raise their hand. One suicide is one too many.”

Hon. Ahmed Hussen (Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship, Lib.)

October 20th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...lantic immigration pilot program is a tremendous opportunity to attract skilled newcomers and their families to Atlantic Canada, and represents a new approach to immigration. This one-of-a-kind program works with employers to settle and integrate not only the skilled immigrants, but also their families, and will now be complemented by a specialized team at IRCC that will work with employers t...”

Hon. Carla Qualtrough (Minister of Public Services and Procurement, Lib.)

October 20th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...the money they are owed. These issues have caused real hardships for many public servants and their families, and they should not have to face them.

Resolving this as quickly as possible is our ...”

Hon. Rob Nicholson (Niagara Falls, CPC)

October 20th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...Mr. Speaker, recently at the justice committee, we heard from a number of victims groups, including Families for Justice. They made the very reasonable proposal that anyone convicted of killing someon...”

Mr. Mario Beaulieu (La Pointe-de-l'Île, BQ)

October 20th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, every year, the families of seasonal workers in the Lac-Saint-Jean region and the entire Quebec forestry industry sp...”

Hon. Jean-Yves Duclos (Minister of Families, Children and Social Development, Lib.)

October 20th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... We believe it is important to have an employment insurance system that provides income security to families, many of whom live in very difficult conditions, and that helps people transition to new jo...”

Mr. Mark Warawa (Langley—Aldergrove, CPC)

October 20th
Hansard Link

Routine Proceedings

“...am honoured to present two petitions. The first petition relates to impaired driving causing death. Families for Justice is a group of Canadians who have lost a loved one to impaired driving. They bel...”

Mr. Michael Cooper (St. Albert—Edmonton, CPC)

October 20th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...why more than 100,000 Canadians have signed a petition calling for Parliament to act. It is why the families of victims who came before the justice committee called upon Parliament to take steps to move forward with mandatory sentences. It is why our previous Conservative government introduced Bill C-73, which would have provided for a six-year mandatory sentence for impaired drivers who kill. It is why I introduced an amendment to Bill C-46 at the justice committee to provide for a mandatory sentence of at least five years, which was the minimum sentence that the victims who appeared before our committee asked for.

Sadly, every single Liberal MP voted against that common-sense amendment. It is one thing to vote against an amendment, but they did not even try. They did not even put forward an alternative. They just shrugged their shoulders and accepted the status quo. The victims and their families deserve better from the government on Bill C-46.

I am hopeful that once the bill is p...”

Mr. Todd Doherty (Cariboo—Prince George, CPC)

October 20th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...was killed 27 years ago by a drunk driver. I can speak with some authority in knowing the pain that families go through. People never recover. There is always a loss in their lives. I know that the pe...”

Mr. Jacques Gourde (Lévis—Lotbinière, CPC)

October 20th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...he Conservatives believe that we need to lower taxes for Canadians, including taxes for businesses, families, and individuals. This is an integral part of the Conservative vision, a vision of prosperity and opportunities for all Canadians.

This bill's objective is very noble and laudable. We want two main things: we want to help the Prime Minister, as a matter of urgency, to keep his promise, and we want to prevent the Liberal government from collecting GST/HST on provincial carbon taxes. (1340)

Let us look back at the untruthful comments the Prime Minister falsely made on October 3, 2016:

Provinces and territories will be able to have a choice in how they implement this pricing. They can put a direct price on carbon pollution, or they can adopt a cap-and-trade system....

Whatever approach is chosen, this policy would be revenue-neutral for the federal government. All revenues generated under this system would stay in the province or territory where they are generated.

Budget 2016 included a 21% increase of GST revenue from 2015-16 to 2020-21, despite the fact that federal GST would stay at 5%. The amount of GST the federal Liberal government is currently collecting through carbon taxes for the 2017-18 fiscal year amounts to $65 million from Alberta and $65 million from British Columbia. In 2018-19, it is projected to be $140 million from Alberta and $110 million from British Columbia, and that is for just two provinces. Imagine how much the government will collect from across Canada. This will mean billions of dollars more unfairly taken away from Canadians through this double taxation.

Halfway through their mandate, the Liberals have an abysmal track record. According to a report by the Fraser Institute, 81% of middle-class families are paying more taxes under the Liberals. These are families that pay on average $840 more per year. That is a significant sum.

The Liberal tax hikes are hurting Canadian families and businesses. Among other things, they scrapped the universal child care benefit, fitness and children's art tax credits, post-secondary and textbook tax credits, as well as income splitting for families.

With respect to small businesses, it is thanks to the pressure applied by the offici...”

Mr. Alain Rayes (Richmond—Arthabaska, CPC)

October 19th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“... a sustainable industry.

Softwood lumber logging and processing feed hundreds of thousands of families, are vital to the survival of many regions, and allow thousands of Canadians to have a stable financial future.

However, the forestry industry, which brings in $15.8 billion a year, also provides the government with $1.5 billion in tax revenues paid by corporations and workers. This means that the entire country benefits, as our local businesses and thousands of Canadians who work in this sector help build our hospitals and ensure services are provided in our schools and community organizations at all levels.

While the Prime Minister dithers, hesitates, and backs downs, he is jeopardizing the livelihoods of forestry workers across Canada and Quebec and in Lac-Saint-Jean. It is estimated that Canadian producers have paid about $500 million in countervailing and anti-dumping duties because the Liberal government refuses to negotiate.

That $500 million, a huge amount, could have been invested in the economy and job creation. It could have been invested in thousands of projects that will now never see the light of day. This means additional debt, rather than additional public services and programs.

Does the government realize how many communities are at risk, as more and more time goes by and nothing is resolved? There are entire towns that depend on this industry. Will those towns survive without some good news, without an agreement?

I want to point out that the softwood lumber industry is a crucial and important sector, especially for regions such as Lac-Saint-Jean, and we must support it. We are now learning that German exports to the U.S. have soared by 916% compared to last year. We are losing our privileged place in the U.S. market, which is our main market. (1015)

Time is of the essence. Sawmills are closing and jobs are being lost across the country and in Saguenay—Lac-Saint-Jean. It seems that the Liberals are incapable of negotiating an agreement. Workers deserve more stability and predictability from this government.

Perhaps we are being naive in continuing to believe in this Liberal government and in its ability to quickly meet expectations, represent Canadians' interests in all forums, and negotiate agreements that benefit everyone. When will the Prime Minister demonstrate true leadership and come back to Canada with a signed agreement? The Netflix tax break, the threat to supply management, NAFTA negotiations, and this government's new negotiations abroad are extremely disappointing. Perhaps we are naive to believe that the Liberal government made the softwood lumber industry a priority. I want to point out that there is no mention of a new agreement in the mandate letters of the ministers currently negotiating with the U.S. government.

Not only is the government jeopardizing the entire industry, but it is also discouraging young people from considering a career in forestry. A few weeks ago, 400 young high school students from across Saguenay—Lac-Saint-Jean learned about the different facets of the forestry industry at the 11th annual Viens vivre la forêt event, which was held at the Chicoutimi campus of the Université du Québec. The event allowed hundreds of young women and men to get behind the wheel of a semi-truck, operate a backhoe, and learn about wood processing.

However, what are the prospects for these young people who might want to pursue a career in forestry, give back to their community, find jobs in their region instead of moving to big urban centres, and grow the economy in their part of the country? What can we promise them? The prospects are not very good at all under this Liberal government. Times are very tough. In Saguenay—Lac-Saint-Jean, more than 5,000 jobs depend directly on the forestry industry. In other words, 5,000 worried families are waiting for the Prime Minister to give them a clear message, a sincere commitment, and ...”

Mr. Richard Cannings (South Okanagan—West Kootenay, NDP)

October 19th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...dustry is critical to the Canadian economy and to the hopes and dreams of thousands of hard-working families across this country.

In British Columbia alone, it contributes $12 billion to the economy every year, and $2.5 billion in direct government revenue. It creates 145,000 British Columbia jobs; one in every 16 jobs in British Columbia. Across Canada, the forest sector contributes more than $20 billion every year to our real GDP.

Canada is a world leader in sustainable forest management. Our forests account for 40% of the world's forests certified as sustainably managed, the largest area of third-party certified forest in the world. Canada has become a leader in the use of biomass energy, using waste and residues from forest manufacturing practices to power mills across the country.

However, the industry has suffered in the past few decades. A vast pine beetle epidemic swept across B.C. in the last decade, killing trees throughout the interior. That epidemic has now moved into Alberta and is threatening the forest industry there. Catastrophic wildfires burned over a million acres of forest in British Columbia this summer, and climate predictions tell us that these hot, dry, and smoky summers will only happen more frequently in the future. That, of course, has reduced the annual allowable cuts for these mills. Mills that were already suffering from the pine beetle epidemic now have even less forest to access.

Then there is the softwood lumber dispute between Canada and the United States that has pressured many mills to close in the last 10 to 15 years. I will talk more about softwood lumber at the end. I just want to say that in my riding that dispute resulted in a lot of job losses: the Weyerhaeuser mill in Okanagan Falls closed in 2007, putting 200 people out of work; and the closure of the mill at Slocan hit that small community hard. In fact, during the years of the Harper Conservative government, Canada lost over 134,000 jobs in the forestry sector, including about 21,000 jobs in British Columbia, 40,000 jobs in Ontario, and 41,000 in Quebec.

I would like to spend the next part of my speech talking about the positive ways to give the forest industry a boost in Canada. An obvious strategy to mitigate the losses from the softwood dispute is to develop markets outside the United States. We have been working on increasing our share in the Asian market, particularly in China. (1115)

The minister mentioned some recent efforts there. British Columbia exporters have been in China for over 10 years, though, and doing quite well. However, those efforts have plateaued because we are up against Russian competition that can simply move products to the Chinese border by train. With the low value of the Russian ruble, it is very difficult for Canadian companies to compete from the other side of the Pacific, for the foreseeable future. That is what I hear from the industry in British Columbia.

As an aside, lumber prices are so high because of the softwood lumber dispute that builders on the east coast of North America are starting to turn to European markets such as Romania and Germany to supply their needs. It is crazy. I think a better strategy in the mid-term is to expand our domestic markets through innovative new wood products and new ways to use wood in buildings.

As I mentioned earlier, in my home town of Penticton, there is a company called Structurlam that creates glulam beams and cross-laminated timber panels that can be used to construct large buildings entirely out of wood. The company just completed an 18-storey project at the University of British Columbia, Brock Commons, the tallest wood building in the world. The only steel and concrete in the building is in the elevator shafts. As the parts were pre-built off-site, Brock Commons took only 66 days to construct. That is 18 stories in just two months. The UBC project used 1.7 million board feet of B.C. lumber. Structurlam gets its lumber locally at mills such as Kalesnikoff, so the benefits spread through the region.

I was happy to see that the government included some money in the latest budget to help this innovative part of the forest industry grow. The minister mentioned that as well. Canadian companies are real leaders in this new technology in North America, but they need to expand to maintain that lead.

With this in mind, I have tabled a private member's bill, Bill C-354, which promotes the use of wood in government infrastructure buildings. This bill asks the government to assess the material options for large buildings, balancing the overall dollar cost of the project and the impact of its greenhouse gas footprint. That way we can decide whether wood, concrete, steel, or a combination of those materials is best for the building.

This bill is not meant to exclude non-wood materials but simply to ask the government to look at these new wood technologies that can be used to create beautiful, safe, and environmentally sound buildings. I was happy to hear from the concrete industry a couple of days ago that it has almost exactly the same ask of the government. It was not, of course, asking for the government to use more wood in buildings; but it was asking the government to use the same lens to look at the lifetime costs of the materials and the carbon footprint of the project when building infrastructure.

I believe that this process would result in more large wood buildings being constructed by the federal government. Many of them could be hybrids, of course, built with concrete and steel as well. This would have three positive impacts on the forest industry. It would stimulate the growth of this exciting new technology, keeping Canada ahead of the pack in North America; it would help all the players in the local forest industry to weather the difficulties they are facing through the softwood lumber dispute; and it would be taking real action to meet Canadian goals in the fight against climate change.

The forestry sector is facing serious challenges in Canada: a future with declining wood supply, more catastrophic fires, insect epidemics due to climate change, and rising costs associated with trade disputes with the United States. I want to turn now to that trade dispute, the softwood lumber dispute with the United States.

About year ago, on October 17, 2016, in this place we debated a similar Conservative motion that specifically focused on softwood lumber. The motion urged the government to take all necessary steps to prevent a trade war with the United States over softwood lumber exports. I supported this previous motion, of course, because for the many thousands of Canadians whose livelihoods depend on this important industry, it is imperative that Canada secure a fair deal with the United States, a deal that respects our regional differences and protects high-quality Canadian forestry jobs. (1120)

However, a year later, here we are. The Canadian government continues to fail in its ability to get a deal. The industry has been hit by the U.S. Department of Commerce with massive, unfair tariffs reaching as high as 27%. These tariffs and our government's inability to secure a trade deal have led and will continue to lead to devastating job losses and damage to this vital Canadian industry.

A report released by The Conference Board of Canada at the end of May 2017 stated that the U.S. softwood lumber duties will result in the loss of 2,200 jobs and a $700 million reduction in Canadian exports over the next two years. Softwood lumber is a vibrant part of Canada's forest sector, and as I mentioned, for many rural communities it is the backbone of the economy.

According to Canada's labour force survey, in 2015 the forest industry counted for 300,000 direct and indirect jobs, compared to more than 400,000 jobs in 2003. Hundreds of sawmills across Canada have been shuttered, taking with them high-quality, well-paid jobs.

Today, the softwood lumber industry is on the verge of more job losses. If we consider such factors as the crash of the U.S. housing markets and the other environmental impacts I mentioned, our already hard-hit industry will be further devastated. Canadian producers and workers need a new softwood lumber agreement that will bring fairness and predictability.

This dispute first began back in 1982. For 35 years, the American industry has argued that the Canadian producers benefit from subsidization, which is a claim that has been defeated time and time again in trade tribunals. I think it has been 14 or 15 times.

Over the years, there have been several managed trade agreements, but upon their expiration Canadian exports have seen more duties applied, and Canada has spent approximately $100 million in legal fees to defend our position. While it is true that Canada has consistently won tribunal warnings under the free trade agreement, NAFTA, and the WTO, which found that U.S. tariffs were unjustified, Canada has lost tens of thousands of jobs. I find it extremely disingenuous that the government touts these so-called tribunal challenges as wins. However, I am quite certain that the people who lost their jobs due to poorly negotiated agreements are thoroughly unimpressed with them.

I also find it extremely concerning that Americans are hell-bent on eliminating NAFTA's chapter 19, the dispute resolution mechanism that has protected Canada against those challenges for so long. After the previous agreement expired in 2001, the U.S. levied $5.4 billion in duties on Canadian imports. This was money that should have stayed in Canadians' pockets, but instead was given to the American industry. It was the beginning of a decade of massive job losses in the Canadian industry.

Soon after the Conservatives were elected in 2006, they negotiated a new agreement with little or no consultation with Canadian stakeholders. The result was a very controversial agreement that many argue represented a sellout of Canadian interests. That agreement took $50 million from Canadian industry to create a binding dispute settlement system whereby the U.S. was able to bring more actions against Canada. Perhaps most egregiously, the agreement allowed the U.S. to keep $1 billion of the duties it illegally levied on Canadian producers. Canadians were furious with the 2006 SLA. When the Conservatives brought it to Parliament in the form of Bill C-24, the NDP argued vehemently against the agreement.

When we look back at this agreement, it is fair to say that the Conservatives caved to American interests. Today, it is imperative that the Liberals do not do the same, and yet, considering the lack of leadership they have shown during the NAFTA renegotiations, I fail to see any change between our past and current governments.

As we know, the 2006 agreement was renewed in 2012 and expired last October. Again, after the Liberal government failed to negotiate a new agreement, the Liberals seemed to spend more time denying their own responsibilities and blaming the previous Conservative government rather than ensuring forest industry workers had the job security they so desperately needed.

Despite the Prime Minister's highly flaunted bromance with former president Barack Obama, the Liberals broke yet another one of their own commitments and failed to get a deal done before the time ran out. (1125)

Now we must negotiate with President Trump, whose administration has moved to hit our softwood lumber industry with even more tariffs. As with the huge hit lumber companies took in 2006, our industry is again reeling, and it is the forestry workers who will suffer most. After years of being unable to negotiate a fair deal, Canadians are left feeling unsure and, quite frankly, abandoned by their government. There seems still to be no path forward.

After two months of foot-dragging, the government introduced a compensation package, which the NDP welcomed, but I must point out that it contained nothing to improve EI benefits for workers who lost their jobs because of this dispute. The $867 million support package was a good short-term measure for industry and forestry companies; however, forestry workers need long-term solutions.

While many concede that another managed trade deal is better than more costly litigation, there is something inherently unfair about the fact that, despite continued findings that Canada is not in the wrong, we continue to negotiate agreements that are clearly in the interests of the U.S. industry.

Many witnesses expressed a desire to see Canada and the U.S. reach a negotiated settlement, one that would work for all our regions, but we also heard in committee, very clearly, that people do not want to see another bad deal. In Quebec, for example, they made a lot of changes in their forestry practices, and any new agreement must recognize these and other regional differences. A one-size-fits-all solution simply will not do.

In the spring of 2016, the Standing Committee on International Trade held meetings on the softwood lumber agreement and submitted a report to Parliament. Sadly, one important voice we did not get to hear at all at the committee was that of labour.

The United Steelworkers, which represents some 40,000 forestry workers, has laid out several requirements for what it would like to see happen. First, it wants to see the creation of a provincial forest community restoration fund, to be invested in workers, forest-dependent communities, and forest health. It wants fair access to the U.S. lumber market, and it discourages a new quota system. It also wants a guarantee that Canadian producers will have the same access to the U.S. market as other countries will enjoy.

I appreciate the Steelworkers' perspective because it represents the workers' point of view. These three things would help give workers greater job security and strengthen the industry instead of weakening it.

In the committee's final report, there were five recommendations made to the government, including that it get a deal done that serves Canadian interests, that it consult with big and small producers, and that any new deal respect regional differences.

I want to raise an issue I have seen more of recently, due to the NAFTA renegotiation process, one that has affected many aspects of the trading relationship Canada has held with our American neighbours. That is, it is an extremely unbalanced and abusive relationship. Repeatedly, whether it has been the 35 years we have argued over softwood lumber, or the nearly 30 years we have had a bilateral and trilateral trade agreement with the Americans, consecutive Canadian governments have continually negotiated bad deals. Perhaps this has to do with the size, strength, and wealth of the United States, but I cannot dismiss this huge lack of leadership and apparent cowardice and weakness shown by consecutive federal governments.

We often speak of political will in this place, so when I see Canadian producers being hit with U.S. tariffs of around 27% in forestry or 300% in aerospace, when I see mills and manufacturing plants being shut down right across Canada, and when I see thousands of people's lives at risk and jobs lost, I have to say that something is wrong. The way we negotiate trade deals is wrong.

I hope the government understands the gravity of what these job losses mean in our communities. Thousands of people have no job to go to and no more paycheques to bring home. Families are worried about how to pay the rent or make the next mortgage payment. I urge the governm...”

Mr. Todd Doherty (Cariboo—Prince George, CPC)

October 19th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...to the American side, which was unfair. Again today, the U.S. is penalizing our forestry producers, families who depend on forestry for their livelihoods, as well as U.S. consumers. It is unbelievable that the Americans are so nearsighted that they are holding their own consumer market hostage. Why? What product makes up a good portion of all the homebuilding and new housing market in the United States?

An hon. member: Softwood.

Mr. Todd Doherty: Softwood, and Canadian softwood. Why is that? It is because we have the best product in the world right here. Not only that, our industry is leading the way in green technology. It is the leading the way in harvesting methods and principles. Despite what we hear, which I will get into, we are being continually attacked by outside interests that have a sole purpose, and that is to shut down the Canadian industry. Whether it is the forest industry, the fishing and marine industry, the tanker industry, or the oil sands, outside interests are intent on one thing: shutting down the industry in Canada.

I got a little off topic, but I will go back to one of the very early throne speeches that the Prime Minister addressed to Canada and the world. He said that under this government, Canada will be known more for its resourcefulness than its natural resources. That rings true to this point. Projects are not being approved. Definitely energy east has gone by the wayside. Where is softwood lumber? That is why we are debating this today. We are seeing more and more uncertainty.

The government's role always is to create an environment in which industry and organizations want to invest to create jobs. At this point, two years into the Liberals' mandate, all they have done is create more uncertainty. A recent article stated that Canada is no longer one of the most economically stable environments or countries in the world because the government continues to cause uncertainty through inconsistent policy, inconsistent measures, and, indeed, questionable actions.

British Columbia is the largest producer of softwood lumber in North America, with $33 billion in output and $12.9 billion in GDP for the province. In 2016, there were, indirectly and directly, over 140,000 jobs tied to the forest industry. There was a total labour income of $8.6 billion. There are over 140 communities in the province of British Columbia that are forest-dependent. My riding of Cariboo—Prince George is one of them.

This past summer, B.C. faced one of the most unprecedented fire seasons. Over 53 million cubic metres of fibre have been scorched. To put that into context, that is the equivalent of one year's annual allowable cut for the province of British Columbia and 10 years' annual allowable cut for my riding of Cariboo—Prince George. It remains to be seen how much of that is still marketable. There is a very small time frame for forest producers to get in to see whether there is any salvageable or marketable wood or fibre. (1150)

We call on our provincial NDP government to allow access to industry, to get in to find out what is going on. We are calling on it again today to make sure that this is taking place. The earlier we can get in and figure out the status of our fibre, the better we can strategize and plan as we move forward.

The B.C. forest sector is the world leader in sustainable forest management with less than 1% of our provincial forests harvested. For every tree taken, three are replanted. That is something that many people never mention, but we can always do better. Our previous government invested in that. We spent hundreds of millions of dollars in green technology allowing us to reforest. If we replant we have a root structure along a bank that means rivers, lakes, and streams are going to be secure as well. We are going to need that more than ever before with the 53 million cubic metres of fibre that has been scorched. Our rivers, lakes, and streams have lost that critical root structure, so we call on the federal government to assist our provincial government to make sure that takes place.

I also want to talk about the impact to Canada. The Minister of Natural Resources talked about the importance to Canada. He has been speaking to the file for awhile and he talked about the value to Canada, $22 billion in GDP. We employ over 200,000 first nations and people right across Canada, with 9,500 jobs in indigenous communities. I would hazard that the actual indirect numbers are well beyond 200,000 and forest-dependent communities are in the hundreds right across Canada.

We see that the government has dithered away a good amount of time on the softwood lumber issue. It was not mentioned in the Speech from the Throne, the very first message to Canadians about what the Liberals were going to do during their mandate. We heard earlier that the first time it was mentioned by a Liberal member of Parliament was January 2016 on a question from a Conservative.

In the early part of 2016, we heard there was a new-found relationship, that the Prime Minister and the outgoing president were BFFs and they were going to get this deal done. As a matter of fact, one of the ministers said that the Prime Minister was absolutely giddy. That was the term that she used in one of her interviews. There was a bromance going on and they were going to hammer through all the challenges.

We pressed from this side and we later heard that within 100 days there would be some form of agreement. I believe the president at the time stood in the House and said “we will come up with a solution to this irritant.” I took offence to the fact that he called it an irritant. This irritant employs my family, my wife's family, so many families in my riding and as we have heard, many families across Canada. It is not an irritant, Mr. President, it is a way of life. It is one of our ...”

Mr. Todd Doherty

October 19th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...s not an NDP timeline. It is Canadians' timeline. It is the forestry industry's timeline. It is the families from across Canada that are waiting for the good news.

Jobs are being lost, more unce...”

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne (Minister of International Trade, Lib.)

October 19th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...alk to the industry in Canada, and ensure that together we can sell more softwood around the world. Families in my riding, just like in his riding, depend on us to act.”

Ms. Anne Minh-Thu Quach (Salaberry—Suroît, NDP)

October 19th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...was negotiated with the United States. This is outrageous.

This affects thousands of jobs and families. Some jobs have already been lost, while others are threatened. It is a very difficult issu...”

Mr. Todd Doherty (Cariboo—Prince George, CPC)

October 19th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...ated. As members can imagine, I am passionate about softwood lumber because it impacts thousands of families in my riding, and we are facing troubling times. The Liberals like to stand up and say they are fighting passionately for these families right across Canada, yet what we seen is a wasted opportunity. They point fingers at the pr...”

Mr. Luc Berthold

October 19th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...nada’s softwood lumber industry. The situation remains unacceptable for thousands of workers, their families, and their communities. These people depend on the federal government to take action with the American administration.

According to the Quebec Forest Industry Council, the softwood lumber industry in that province generates $15.8 billion a year, including nearly $4 billion in salaries and benefits. Natural Resources Canada indicates that the industry employs more than 200,000 people, including 9,500 in indigenous communities. In Quebec, 58,000 jobs are directly related to the forestry industry.

Despite these impressive figures, we are still waiting for concrete action by the government. This lack of leadership jeopardizes the security of entire communities that depend on the softwood lumber industry. We are hearing this message everywhere. We hear it from workers, from people who live in towns and villages across Quebec, from people in British Columbia, from people all across Canada where there is a large forestry industry, and from people on the ground who depend on the sustainability of the softwood lumber industry.

We hear this message from people like Gilles Potvin, spokesperson for the forest committee of the Union des municipalités du Québec. Back in April he told La Presse:

The Quebec forestry industry is being doubly penalized by the new U.S. tariffs on softwood lumber.

This puts us in a really difficult situation, and the last small, family-owned businesses that are still in the game are going to be further penalized. They do not have the capacity to withstand this additional pressure.

In Quebec's regions, in places like Matawinie, forestry companies are expecting this to have a significant impact.

This spring, in an article in the newspaper L'Action, it was estimated that lumber mills like the one in Saint-Michel-des-Saints would have to pay up to $3 million a year because of the new tariffs.

The Alliance des chambres de commerce de Lanaudière stated in May:

...this new conflict jeopardizes the competitiveness of many companies and the very survival of the forestry industry, which is crucial to the economic vitality of Quebec City and its regions.

Despite all that, the government still does not seem to understand the importance of the serious issues we are talking about today. In the previous speech, I heard an argument to the effect that this government simply does not understand the urgent need to take action and to stand up to the Americans.

The fact that the rise in lumber prices from $500 to $650 is being used as an excuse as to why the government is in no hurry to reach an agreement with the Americans explains a lot about our current predicament. We can understand why the issue of a new softwood lumber deal was never raised during the Prime Minister's first meeting with the American president, President Obama. Why was it not raised? The Liberals told us not to worry, that there was plenty of time, that the industry would be able to manage on its own. “No need to worry”, they said. We were told that prices had gone up, and that there was no need to negotiate because people were not complaining too loudly. Families are concerned and people are afraid of losing their jobs? No need to worry. The Liberal government certainly is not. Now there is a byelection. No need to worry. The Liberals will just say that they are getting around to it, but by next week nothing will have changed. This is serious. (1245)

It is important for the government to carefully examine today's motion and to take action against these foreign-funded groups seeking to disrupt our forestry industry because the damage being caused now is permanent, even though the price of softwood lumber has risen. These people are being allowed to tarnish the reputation of our forestry industry. The government is doing nothing and then wondering why thousands of jobs have been lost in regions like Saguenay—Lac-Saint-Jean. That is unacceptable.

Organizations like Greenpeace and ForestEthics, which are spreading misinformation about the forestry sector and have been trying for a long time to destroy it, have understood that this government had no intention of doing something about this harmful propaganda and that they could continue with this campaign of misinformation. Why not, when no one is standing in the way? They need this campaign to fundraise abroad or, even worse, to obtain money from certain U.S. lobbies who do not want Canadian softwood lumber entering the United States. These are the issues we must focus on and address today with the motion moved by my colleague from Richmond—Arthabaska. That is why, today, we are asking the government to stand up for once to these groups that are threatening hundreds of thousands of jobs across Canada.

Mr. Garneau told The Globe and Mail that Greenpeace is not satisfied with marauding just our companies, but also our way of life, which is built on nurturing healthy forests that are the lifeblood of the people who live there.

Forests are synonymous with Canada. Forestry workers are at the heart of Canada's history. The forest is a major resource that has made Canada one of the most beautiful, greatest, and richest countries in the world. We must preserve our forests and, above all, we must protect it against foreigners with interests other than protecting the families of Canada's forestry workers.”

Mr. Bob Zimmer (Prince George—Peace River—Northern Rockies, CPC)

October 19th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...t kind of terminology, but it really comes down to food on tables, roofs over heads, and sustaining families where they want to live.

I was born and raised in the Peace region. We lived out here in Ottawa when my kids were small. We are happy to be back in Fort St. John and the north Peace area of the province of British Columbia. People ask why we would want to go back when we lived in such a nice city, in Ottawa. It is because it is home. A lot the forestry workers simply want a nice place to live, which we have in beautiful northern British Columbia.

Robson Valley is another place where there is a lot of forestry, including in Valemount, McBride, Prince George, and all the way up the Rocky Mountains. They all really rely on the forest industry. It is not a number they rely on in the forest industry; it is a person, a family, and other industries. There are subsets of those industries, employing heavy-duty mechanics and others. I have often said that a person at Tim Hortons selling coffee to people in the morning is likely selling it to someone who works at a mill and makes lumber. Likewise, someone who works on trucks, like my son, a heavy-duty mechanic, likely works for a company in forestry. He is a first-year apprentice. He works on trucks and heavy equipment that go right out into the forest. That is how he makes his living. It has afforded him a nice car and lifestyle.

I want to get back to the government needing to care about that person on the ground. We are coming up to Christmas. We will be celebrating a great season with our families and we want to make sure that those jobs and lifestyles are sustained.

I hope that th...”

Mr. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NDP)

October 19th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“... in those mills. Just within British Columbia alone, never mind across Canada, tens of thousands of families can no longer rely on the forestry sector.

Various factors have come into play in tha...”

Mr. T.J. Harvey (Tobique—Mactaquac, Lib.)

October 19th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...at were unfairly imposed on Canadian lumber producers created uncertainty for the workers and their families within the industry. This is why in June of this year our government announced $867 million for the softwood lumber action plan to support the workers and the communities affected by these duties.

Specifically, we have two measures in the action plan that will help workers. First, our government is spending $9.5 million over four years for a work-sharing program that gives employees and employers the flexibility that they require when there is a temporary reduction of business activity. This program supplements employment insurance benefits and eligible workers who are working temporarily reduced hours. It extends the maximum period for work-sharing agreements from 38 to 76 weeks in order to reduce layoffs. This measure will help companies to retain skilled workers even during difficult economic times. Second, we are providing $80 million over two years through labour market development agreements. This funding will help workers to upgrade their skills and transition into new opportunities. We recognize that career transition can be a difficult and stressful time. To help make it easier, workers will receive salary top-ups through a targeted earning supplement while they are making the move to another field of employment.

I also want to acknowledge that forestry is very important to our indigenous communities across the country. This is why we will provide $10 million over three years to support forestry initiatives in our indigenous communities. These initiatives can be in clean technology, environmental stewardship, or forestry resource management.

As the Minister of Natural Resources had said when the package was announced, “...This action plan delivers on our pledge to take swift and reasonable action to defend our softwood lumber industry and charts a stronger future for the workers, families and communities that depend on it.” (1315)

Finally, our government is actively working to help the forestry industry access new international markets. The Minister of International Trade is leading forestry-related trade missions around this issue. For example, Asia is a market with an increasing potential for Canadian lumber products and the minister has promoted the use of Canadian forestry products during recent visits to China, Vietnam, Singapore, South Korea, and Japan.

Canada continues to believe that a negotiated settlement that brings stability and predictability to the softwood lumber industry is the best option for both countries, but we will not accept a deal at any cost. It is not right for our industry, it is not right for our communities, and it is not right for our workers. A durable negotiated agreement would be the best outcome for Canadians and for Americans. While there is no deal at this time, we are continuing to work toward this goal. We are looking for a good deal, not just any deal.

It is important that we realize that this should not be a partisan issue. This is an industry that affects communities, families, and workers all across this country. It is important to note that we as a government have said from day one that we support these families, we support the workers, and we support the industry stakeholders during this difficult period.

In my riding of Tobique—Mactaquac, softwood lumber plays an integral role. It is huge in my riding and it is huge in the province of New Brunswick. The majority of New Brunswick softwood lumber exports go directly to the United States. It takes three and a half hours to drive the length of my riding, and the entire length of that is the U.S. border. We work strategically hand in hand with U.S. counterparts that are just across the border trading back and forth in an industry that often has shared resources for industry stakeholders on both sides of the border.

When I talk to American consumers, which I have done on several occasions over the last six months, they want to see softwood lumber prices stay relatively where they are. That is because they do not want to see the cost of their homes go up. That is where the U.S. is offside. It is offside for a plethora of reasons, but one of the main reasons is because it is failing to recognize the detrimental impact this is having on U.S. consumers.

As a politician in the Canadian government, I find it offensive both to myself and to our government that people are trying to play partisan politics on an issue that we should all be united on. The last softwood lumber agreement stretched over half a decade and it too was filled with partisan comments back and forth. What did that ever get us? We spend a lot of time in the House nitpicking back and forth for partisan political reasons when we should be focused on the task at hand which is to support Canadian workers, to support the sector, and to support industry stakeholders through this difficult time and to help them try to adapt and find new markets, focus on civil culture, focus on ways that they can grow their business and respect those families and try to do this collectively.”

Mr. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NDP)

October 19th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“..., it is to get something done. When does he expect this deal to actually get done? That is what the families I represent want to know. This is my specific question, what impact will it have on a per d...”

Mr. Rhéal Fortin (Rivière-du-Nord, BQ)

October 18th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...The list will help law enforcement officials do their work. This is a good bill that will help keep families safer. It is one more tool to help us fight organized crime more efficiently. The Standing ...”

Mr. Charlie Angus (Timmins—James Bay, NDP)

October 18th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...Wenjacks out there today, trying to find their way home from a system that had robbed them of their families, of their identity, and of their culture.

Go to the angels Gord and rock that choir. ...”

Mr. Francesco Sorbara (Vaughan—Woodbridge, Lib.)

October 18th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...eurial spirit, Carlo co-founded the Greenpark Group, which has built homes for over 72,000 Canadian families.

A home is where our children grow up, where we make memories, and communities come t...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

October 18th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...althiest 1%, like delivering the Canada child benefit to give more money to nine out of 10 Canadian families. That is what this government is focused on, not the petty politics that the members opposi...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

October 18th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ter of Finance because we promised to invest in the middle class, promote economic growth, and help families in need. That is exactly what we are doing.

We lowered taxes for the middle class and raised them for the wealthiest Canadians. We introduced the Canada child benefit, which gives more money to nine out of ten families, and we improved the guaranteed income supplement for our most vulnerable seniors. We conti...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

October 18th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...n the wealthiest 1%. We have ended the sending of Conservative child benefit cheques to millionaire families so we could give more money to nine out of 10 Canadian families, and cut child poverty by 40%.

These are the things the finance minister has been foc...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

October 18th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...e going through tough times, especially those in the retail sector, and we will continue to support families, workers, and seniors to ensure that they are confident about their futures. That is what t...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

October 18th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ing them on the wealthiest 1%, delivering a Canada child benefit that helps nine out of 10 Canadian families, staying focused on strengthening the guaranteed income supplement for our vulnerable elder...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

October 18th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...this country have been a national tragedy for decades now. We know we need to bring healing for the families, justice for the victims, and to put an end to this national tragedy once and for all. That...”

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Development, Lib.)

October 18th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ll lift hundreds of thousands of children out of poverty and will give more money to nine out of 10 families.

When we look at goal number three, good health and well-being, we have made a commit...”

Mr. Larry Maguire (Brandon—Souris, CPC)

October 18th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“... to a direct Order Paper question asking for a financial analysis on what the carbon tax will do to families' household budgets. The Liberals refused to provide any information on how their carbon tax will impact low-income persons and families. The government refuses to tell us how much the carbon tax will impact inflation and how it will erode the disposable income of pensioners and seniors. It begs the question of what they are hiding.

I imagine that every member of Parliament has received correspondence or has been stopped in the street by a constituent asking for information about the carbon tax. I know I have. Let me just provide one example of what I am hearing from constituents. My office was contacted by a couple who live just outside the city of Brandon, but drive into the city every day to work, shop, and run errands. They drive hundreds of kilometres every week, out of necessity, and take every possible measure to keep their fuel bill manageable. Once their income is taxed, groceries are purchased, and they pay their bills, there is not a whole lot left. They would like the Liberal government to be forthright with them. In particular, they would like the government to spell out exactly how much more money it will take out of their family's budget. (1830)

While this is just one specific example of constituents wanting to know more details about the carbon tax, I can guarantee people that every member in the House has a similar story. Not only should this motion be passed, it is also incumbent upon the Liberal government to change its secretive ways when it comes to accessing financial information.

The documents that were released from Finance Canada were so heavily redacted we would swear they must have contained the nation's secrets or maybe even the Minister of Finance's disclosure to the Ethics Commissioner. What we can glean from the documents is that the government knows there will be a cascading effect on prices that consumers, families, and businesses will pay as a result of this new carbon tax.

These documents reference data tables in which those costs are laid out for families, broken down by income brackets: the very poor, the poor, the middle class, the upper-middl...”

Hon. Pierre Poilievre (Carleton, CPC)

October 17th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“... trusts they enjoy and the inheritances that have been passed down to them. I do not begrudge their families their success, but I ask that they hold themselves to the same standard as everyone else.

Average Canadians pay higher taxes under the government. We saw how the finance minister and the Prime Minister meticulously designed a tax increase, targeted at local businesses and family farmers, that would protect their family fortunes. The billion-dollar family business of the finance minister, Morneau Shepell, is publicly traded, so it faced no new taxes under this latest attack on small businesses. The Prime Minister went out and boasted to the media that his family fortune would not be affected by any of the tax increases. Meanwhile, the hard-working entrepreneurs who started with nothing and built their way from the ground up were expected to pay taxes as high as 71%.

It is as though the finance minister and the Prime Minister were at the top of a castle wall looking down at the peasants and pulling up the ladder so that nobody could climb and join the court. This is the imagery the government creates when it protects the aristocratic wealth of the Prime Minister and the finance minister and prevents everyone else from having an opportunity to build a brighter future for themselves the same way the finance minister's father and the Prime Minister's grandfather were able to build for their families.

This comes back to the essential debate we are having in this country. On the other ...”

Hon. Pierre Poilievre

October 17th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“... tax burden so that hard-working people can continue to earn a better life for themselves and their families? Will they build upon the Conservative record, which reduced poverty to its lowest level on...”

Mr. Joël Lightbound (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance, Lib.)

October 17th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...e lifted hundreds of thousands of children out of poverty. Since July 2016, nine out of 10 Canadian families with children are receiving more in child benefits than they did under the previous system.

We also expanded the Canada pension plan to ensure Canadians would be better off financially in their retirement. The strengthened CPP will provide more money to Canadians when they retire. so they can worry less about their savings and focus more on enjoying time with their families.”

Mr. Gérard Deltell (Louis-Saint-Laurent, CPC)

October 17th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“... earlier that his government had introduced budget measures that leave more money in the pockets of families and that make the wealthy, the infamous 1%, pay more in taxes. The facts say otherwise.

First of all, the Fraser Institute published a study two weeks ago that found that 80% of families are now paying $840 more than when we were in government. Also, with respect to the Liberal...”

Mr. Joël Lightbound

October 17th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...for the middle class and bringing in the Canada child benefit, which gives $454 million annually to families in the Quebec City region, where the hon. member for Louis-Saint-Laurent is from. Nine out of ten families in the Quebec City area are getting an extra $2,300 a year, tax free, which is good for sma...”

Mr. Joël Lightbound

October 17th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...it that we have put forward is the most progressive it has ever been. We stopped sending cheques to families of millionaires, the most privileged and wealthy Canadians, to give more to those who need ...”

Mr. Chris Bittle (St. Catharines, Lib.)

October 17th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...of it was, of course, the finance minister. As a result of the Canada child benefit, nine out of 10 families are getting more in benefits than they did under the previous government. With the CCB, we ...”

Mr. Francesco Sorbara

October 17th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...we saw an acceleration in wage growth and this is great for Canadian workers and great for Canadian families. It is also great for the people I represent. This too is related to polices that we have put in place and consultations that we have had and are having with regards to tax fairness.

Our government laid the foundation for economic growth the moment we took office. The first thing we did was to cut taxes for nine million middle-class Canadians, providing over $20 billion of tax relief to Canadians. We also raised taxes on the wealthiest 1%, which was the right thing to do. Single individuals who benefit from this are saving an average of $330 per year and couples who benefit are saving an average of $540 each year.

Our government has also made child benefits more accessible to Canadians, a simpler program, a tax-free program, providing on average $2,300 extra per year, per family. That is remarkable and again relates to the actions and the policies put in place by our finance minister. I am proud to be a part of that. I am proud to be a part of a team that cares for children who currently live in poverty, a team that cares for families who currently need a bit of assistance. That is what our party is about, again speaking to ...”

Mrs. Cheryl Gallant (Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke, CPC)

October 17th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...e five principles of the Liberal Party's tax policy. First, it attacks small business. Just ask the families who run campgrounds how effective that attack has been. Second, it continues to raise taxes...”

Mr. Pat Kelly (Calgary Rocky Ridge, CPC)

October 17th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...duce taxes on middle-class Canadians, but then stripped away all the credits that most middle-class families use, leaving the average Canadian family paying over $800 in additional income tax under th...”

Mr. Francis Scarpaleggia (Lac-Saint-Louis, Lib.)

October 17th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...retirement and to honour her remarkable advocacy for those with intellectual disabilities and their families.

Natalie believes deeply that it not only takes a village to raise a child and to car...”

Mr. Nathan Cullen (Skeena—Bulkley Valley, NDP)

October 17th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...h and potential conflict of interest. Will my friend the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Families, Children and Social Development stand in the House and explain when he was told this untru...”

Hon. Pierre Poilievre (Carleton, CPC)

October 17th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...Morneau Shepell shares were in a blind trust. He had the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Families tell me on Twitter that his holdings were in a blind trust. He told the media himself two y...”

Mr. Jean-Claude Poissant (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food, Lib.)

October 17th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, our government strongly supports Canada's supply management system and Canadian families and producers. Our government remains committed to listening to what Canadians have to say ...”

Hon. Hedy Fry (Vancouver Centre, Lib.)

October 17th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...'s housing challenges are at the forefront of this government's agenda.

Could the Minister of Families, Children and Social Development tell the House what he is doing on those important issues?...”

Hon. Jean-Yves Duclos (Minister of Families, Children and Social Development, Lib.)

October 17th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...nd more fair society.

Our government believes that housing is the cornerstone of the lives of families and communities. We are going to announce, in the next few weeks, the first-ever national h...”

Mr. Jean-Claude Poissant (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food, Lib.)

October 17th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, as I said, our government strongly supports supply management, farmers and their families. As we have said from the very start in the House, we will continue to defend producers fro...”

Mr. Kennedy Stewart (Burnaby South, NDP)

October 17th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... met with residents of the Post 83 Co-operative in my riding, and they are very worried. Forty-five families could lose their homes when the federal government pulls funding from co-operative housing ...”

Mr. Jean-Claude Poissant (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food, Lib.)

October 17th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, our government strongly supports supply management, farmers, and their families.

Our government remains committed to listening to Canadians on international trade is...”

Hon. Navdeep Bains (Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development, Lib.)

October 17th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... need to be there to help these citizens during these difficult times, help these workers, help the families, and help these different communities. We will remain engaged. We will work with the stakeh...”

Mr. Mike Bossio (Hastings—Lennox and Addington, Lib.)

October 16th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“... closer to the land than farmers. Their hard work, 365 days a year, not only provides for their own families, but provides for every family living in cities as well. When one is as close to the land a...”

Mr. Richard Cannings (South Okanagan—West Kootenay, NDP)

October 16th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...uite a history of ranchland conservation in Canada. Many ranches have been in the hands of the same families for generations. Ranchers know their land. They know how to keep the land healthy and, in d...”

Mr. Larry Maguire (Brandon—Souris, CPC)

October 16th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...ation and environmental policy. I would argue that the current Liberal government has let down farm families in some of those areas. It has stopped listening to the constituents who make a living from working the land. There are many examples of how it has let farmers down, such as its proposed tax hikes that will make it harder to transfer the farm from one generation to another. In fact, it has scheduled its so-called consultations right in the middle of harvest. If the Liberal government thought it was going to quietly hike taxes without anyone noticing, it was obviously wrong.

The Liberals also announced in their budget that they want to completely eliminate cash grain ticket deferrals. The current cash purchase ticket system helps farmers to stabilize income from year to year to ensure the long-term sustainability of their operations. Running a farm is no easy task. It means taking serious financial risks, while dealing with conditions outside of their control, such as weather, market prices, and transportation bottlenecks. Now the Liberals are about to impose a massive carbon tax that will cost farm families thousands of dollars. We know that their national carbon tax will cost over $5.8 billion—ju...”

Mr. Todd Doherty (Cariboo—Prince George, CPC)

October 16th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“... to discuss M-108, I want to talk about my riding of Cariboo—Prince George and, indeed, friends and families of my wife and I. We have just come through one of the most devastating summers that members could imagine because of the wildfires and the huge swaths of farming land that have been lost. Our agricultural land and our agricultural industry, as well as our forestry industry, have been devastated by the wildfires.

I salute our hon. colleague for bringing this motion forward. Our Canadian farmers and ranchers are amongst the very best in the world. There is a huge global demand for the products we grow and produce. My area is primarily cattle country, but in terms of Canada's beef production overall, in 2016 alone, $2.3 billion worth of cattle exports went to over 56 countries worldwide. Right now, the U.S. is our number one trading partner for our beef shipments, which speaks to the reasons we should be diversifying those trade lines.

Among the things that our previous government did was to invest in our farmers and ranchers, that is, our agricultural sector, to make sure they were leading the charge in new technology and ways that would make us globally sustainable and attractive. Our products and farmers and ranchers are above anything else. They are leading the way in sustainable practices.

Our farmers and ranchers work 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. I always say that while their books may show they are earning a lot of money, they are not the ones who spend that money on fancy condos, villas, or vacations. The money they earn gets spent in the communities they live. They are always preparing for the next season.

My family, as well as my wife's family, are long-standing farming families. We know the ups and downs and how trade and cattle prices can make a difference at our Sunday afternoon dinner or how things are going in our everyday finances.

Farming is not a glamorous life, but it truly is an honourable life. Our farmers and farming families care deeply about their communities. They care deeply about our country, our rivers, lakes, and streams. During the 2017 summer wildfires, it was our farmers and ranchers who refused the evacuation orders. They stood tall to fight back the fires. They protected their own properties and their neighbours' properties. Many of them are also logging contractors. They are the ones who know our region and our communities better than anyone else. They know the shortcuts to the next pasture. They know the shortcuts to the next town. It was that local knowledge that saved many properties and, indeed, lives. (1145)

I would like to acknowledge, and I have done it time and time again, the efforts of our farmers and our community, which stood tall during the fires we had.

Sometimes they take a hit, as we just saw with the unfair tax proposals put forward a few weeks back. They were going to target our farmers. They were going to target those hard-working families. I have yet to see what these changes look like. I think the announcement has just been made. We should be doing everything in our power to make sure we are celebrating, not punishing, those hard-working farming families.

Our government invested heavily in our agriculture sector during our term, because we knew that this was a competitive area for Canada and an area where Canada can really be on the forefront in terms of technology and new practices.

It is not a glamorous life. It is a very hard life. Our farmers, much like our foresters and our fishers, are the salt of the earth. They are hard working. They never say no. They have a can-do spirit.

One of the challenges they face is that the next generation is not coming along behind them to take over the family farms. In our neck of the woods, we have seen international firms come along. We cannot blame those farmers who do not have the next generation coming behind them. These firms are offering huge sums of money to take over their farms. We have lost a lot of agricultural land because these international groups have come in and have plowed under generations of grazing lands and fields for the purpose of carbon credits offshore.

I first became aware of this in 2015, when I was running for the Conservative nomination and then for this position. It was shameful to see that we lost in excess of 20,000 acres of prime agricultural land in our neck of the woods. It was mowed under and sprayed with incredible amounts of pesticides, with no care whatsoever with respect to adjacent fields and herds. It was all for an offshore company, which makes many brand names. I was shocked to learn that it had purchased this plot of land and had mowed it under, all for offshore carbon credits. That is shameful. I think we have managed to stem the tide of that, but we see a lot of challenges in terms of doing whatever we can to make it easier for the next generation to come into and buy into this honourable profession.

Our farmers and ranchers truly are the conversationists of our land. They know their land better than anyone else. They care for their animals like no other. If members have ever seen a rancher who has lost part of a herd to wolf kills or predator kills and how they grieve and how it bothers them, it is truly moving. Time and again we have people who do not understand the farming life, the ranching life, and the rodeo life who complain about rodeos being rough and animal cruelty. It is a way of life in the Cariboo, and I am proud of it.

I am proud of our families in the Cariboo. I am proud of our ranchers and our farmers right across the country. I will...”

Mr. Robert Sopuck (Dauphin—Swan River—Neepawa, CPC)

October 16th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...is enjoying this particular example.

The small business tax will make life harder for fishing families like Mr. Nickerson's. Throw in the MPA designation, throw in a potential carbon tax, and on...”

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa West—Nepean, Lib.)

October 16th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...st the victims. I and all members of this House and Canadians extend our deepest condolences to the families of the victims of this heinous attack. Canada stands with the people of Somalia. In trying ...”

Mr. Kerry Diotte (Edmonton Griesbach, CPC)

October 16th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...run the reno company and keep it afloat. She wanted her employees to keep their jobs and feed their families.

The company flourished, but Marie is now terrified that the proposed Liberal changes...”

Mr. Garnett Genuis (Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan, CPC)

October 16th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...inues to rise. Our thoughts and prayers are with the people of Somalia, and especially the affected families.

African nations are on the front line of the fight against terrorism, and many have ...”

Hon. Diane Lebouthillier (Minister of National Revenue, Lib.)

October 16th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...elp middle-class Canadians. We stopped the cheques the Conservatives were sending to the wealthiest families, and we replaced them with the Canada child benefit, which puts more money in the pockets of nine out of ten families. We have lifted more than 300,000 children—”

Hon. Navdeep Bains (Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development, Lib.)

October 16th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, we are always concerned about the impact on employees and their families.[English]

That is why we are monitoring the situation very closely. We understand that this is very difficult for many regions, for many of the workers and their employees, as well with Sears Canada. That is why we are closely looking at the situation that is before the courts. We cannot comment on any of the specific matters that are before the courts, but we are also looking at what benefits we can provide. We will continue to engage and work with the workers and their families in the different communities across the country.”

Hon. Navdeep Bains (Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development, Lib.)

October 16th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...eaker, I can understand and appreciate that this is a very difficult time for the workers and their families in many communities across the country. I understand that the current Sears Canada pension fund assets are held in trust and, as such, must be used solely for the benefit of pensioners. It is completely protected from the claims of other creditors. The unfunded pension portion will have a claim, and the proceeds of those claims of liquidation will be a priority for the pensioners as well. We will continue to monitor the situation. We are going to work with the workers, we are going to work with their families, and we are going to work with the different communities.”

Mr. Sean Casey (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Canadian Heritage, Lib.)

October 16th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ployment to over 630,000 Canadians. Through our new economic strategy, we are committing to support families across the country. Thanks to Creative Canada, we are going to amend our policies to help o...”

Mr. Scott Duvall (Hamilton Mountain, NDP)

October 16th
Hansard Link

S. O. 52

“...dation of Sears Canada would affect the well-being of 17,000 current and former employees and their families, which will adversely affect thousands of small businesses and other retail suppliers and a...”

Mr. Kelly McCauley (Edmonton West, CPC)

October 16th
Hansard Link

Routine Proceedings

“...t that destroys pipelines and takes away the hope of getting our oil to market. Our communities and families are suffering.

I received a letter from a lady named Sharon who lives in my riding. She says:

The job crisis in Alberta affects my family...negatively. My husband lost his job last July, and is still job hunting. I'm worried because I'm the only one working in the family. It's...tough...now, and I don't know when everything goes back to normal.

I can feel for Sharon. Just last week, we held a town hall in downtown Edmonton because the member for Edmonton Centre refused to do an open town hall. We had a town hall on the business tax attack. We had well over 120 people come out and tell us about their issues. I met a young lady whose husband had just been laid off. She had been laid off as well. They could not find work so their answer was that they would create their own work, create their own jobs and go into business for themselves. Then they sit and look at the Liberal attacks on small businesses and ask us how they can do that. They have lost their jobs in the energy sector, the Liberal government is killing pipelines and killing hope. They want to go into business for themselves but now they are being attacked on that front as well. They asked how they could even hope to thrive in Alberta. It is difficult to understand how, given what the Liberal government and the NDP government in Alberta are doing, they can find help or hope, but I can trust that Albertans will pull through if anyone can.

I met a lady named Kathy who said that her husband worked for a large firm. That firm has is are continuing to lay off thousands, and it is scary living that way. A gentleman named Don contacted our office and said that the Liberal government's lack of a real plan was putting families like his further in debt with no help to recover. It is a struggle to keep up with day to d...”

Hon. Ed Fast (Abbotsford, CPC)

October 6th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...nts of the impact that her carbon tax will have on Canada, including on our small businesses and on families across this country. The Liberals hand us the information, but it is heavily redacted, whic...”

Mr. Garnett Genuis (Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan, CPC)

October 6th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“Mr. Speaker, consider two families. In one, a single income earner makes $75,000. In another, two income earners make $38,000 each. The family with a single income in this case pays more tax, even though they are making less money. That is not fair.

The government has tried to justify its unfair tax changes by claiming that the current rules give a mechanism for splitting income to some couples, a mechanism that does not exist for wage earners. However, this difference is the result of a Liberal decision to do away with income splitting for parents in the first place.

At the time of the last election, all parents could split their income, regardless of how they earned it. That was fair. The Liberals are now using a situation they created to justify their unfair changes. However, families understand that income splitting is always fair because it reflects the reality that families share their income and that families who earn the same income should pay the same rate of tax.

If the government wants a f...”

Mr. Jacques Gourde (Lévis—Lotbinière, CPC)

October 6th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...many precious, magical, and unique moments over the years and took family portraits for hundreds of families in the greater Quebec City region.

He was a certified professional photographer and o...”

Mr. Matt DeCourcey (Fredericton, Lib.)

October 6th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...ut to his sons Alexander and Ian, partner Anne, mother June, siblings John, Wendy, and David, their families, and all those who loved him dearly.”

Ms. Christine Moore (Abitibi—Témiscamingue, NDP)

October 6th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...anxious because the Liberals abandoned their promise to deal with the spring gap. Workers and their families may find themselves without income for weeks in the very dead of winter. The Liberals are t...”

Mr. Peter Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby, NDP)

October 6th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...iors at the George Derby Centre.

Will the minister come and meet with the residents and their families at the George Derby Centre? Will the government end the funding crisis so veterans get the ...”

Hon. Seamus O'Regan (Minister of Veterans Affairs, Lib.)

October 6th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...fed or of which I am aware. However, I would be happy to meet with any concerned veterans and their families at any time. Therefore, I will work with his office to make that happen.

In the meantime, on the issue of funding for our veterans, so far we have put $7 billion into funding for our veterans and their families.

I am very proud that yesterday we had the opportunity to deal with a joint suicide prevention strategy, which brought together all parts of our Armed Forces, the Department of National Defence, and Veterans Affairs, to help our veterans and their families with a—”

Mr. Gordon Brown (Leeds—Grenville—Thousand Islands and Rideau Lakes, CPC)

October 6th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...oric moments that took place there. (1335)

Along the Rideau waterway, for example, are many families who can trace their origins to the construction of the canal. With happy thoughts and gener...”

Ms. Jenny Kwan (Vancouver East, NDP)

October 6th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...rongly that there must be a commitment to invest in affordable housing and services for seniors and families in and surrounding the Chinatown area.

Our community is never short on ideas, passion...”

Ms. Anne Minh-Thu Quach (Salaberry—Suroît, NDP)

October 5th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...ccording to the CCPA study, the public sector could save approximately $18 billion a year. Canadian families and businesses could save approximately $13.7 billion. The PBO and the CCPA have also shown that the cost of putting in place such a system is very high, but that does not mean that we should not move forward. It would still cost less than paying private companies for drug coverage.

As my colleague from Vancouver Kingsway mentioned, it would cost approximately $4 billion less to cover all Canadians. What do members not understand? It is simple. Every Canadian could have fair access to prescription drugs and protect their health while continuing to pay less for their medication. It seems to me that 1 + 1 = 2. We have been saying this for years.

When Tommy Douglas first proposed universal health care, he did not let anything stand in his way. He looked for a way to implement the system without draining the public coffers. Health Canada employs many talented civil servants and experts. Our university centres, think tanks, and research centres can help us develop a pharmacare program that covers all Canadians.

I am positive that we can succeed if we get to work right away. These are common-sense measures. What we hope to achieve with this motion is simply to ensure that all Canadians have the same health rights.

We pride ourselves on being a powerful, modern, developed, democratic country, but one of the fundamental criteria for assessing those characteristics and maintaining our high standing is the level of inequality. (1030)

Our patchwork of vastly different reimbursement systems is a source of inequality. The fact that you might pay a different price for a drug depending on whether you live in Quebec or Saskatchewan creates inequality among Canadians. This injustice disproportionately affects those already most in need, namely our young and our seniors.

Are we really going to risk our children's health in an attempt to save money, when we know that we are not going save any money and that we are actually losing close to $5 billion a year by not implementing a universal pharmacare system?

This also affects seniors, people who worked their whole lives to build this country so they could make society better and leave a better world for their children. As everyone here can agree, we are smart enough to know that the longer we put something off, the more it will cost us later on. It is time for us to invest in our future, in our health, and in the future of our youth and our country as a whole.

Like I said earlier, the other group who is most affected is our seniors. We know and we recognize what they have done for Canada. They spent their lives contributing to our economy and our government. After a lifetime of work, regardless of their occupation, they deserve a health care system that provides fair access to drugs.

In fact, a number of studies show that people who do not fill their prescriptions because of cost can suffer real consequences. For example, one researcher found that patients 65 and over were less likely to fill their prescriptions because they had to pay for them, and they did not have the means to do so.

This tendency has led to an increase in hospitalizations, emergency care, and doctor visits. For some health policy researchers, this is evidence that prescription drugs should be considered as necessary drugs under the Canada Health Act.

Now I would like to take a closer look at the conditions under which people would access this public system. The program's beneficiaries would hardly be taking advantage of the system. In Quebec, the goal would be to help people who do not have a private health plan and their families, as well as seniors and people living in extreme poverty who have nowhere to turn but to th...”

Mr. John Oliver (Oakville, Lib.)

October 5th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...is life-saving pharmaceutical intervention without all of us sharing in the cost? All of us and our families face the risk of not being able to access essential medicines because we cannot afford them. We need to work together, pool risk, and support each other, as we have in other important health services.

Our government is already working to improve the affordability of prescription drugs and our access to them. Our current focus is on reducing the price of drugs, which will help improve access to necessary medications. We join provinces and territories as a member of the pan-Canadian Pharmaceutical Alliance, which negotiates lower drug prices on behalf of public drug plans. In the year and a half since joining, we have been able to use this bulk buying power to negotiate 60 agreements that are already saving Canadians money. We continue working collaboratively with the provinces and territories on other ways to make prescription drugs more affordable and accessible for Canadians.

Through the Patented Medicine Prices Review Board, the Government of Canada regulates the maximum allowable prices of patented drugs. The board recently completed the first phase of a consultation with Canadians on changes to its guidelines that would enable it to better protect consumers from excessive patented drug prices.

While much has been done to make pharmaceuticals more affordable for Canadians, I believe more can be done. I do not believe that lowering the cost of drugs would make them any more affordable for that single, temporarily unemployed mother of two. The problem is that prescription drugs outside of hospital care are not covered by the Canada Health Act.

As Canadians, we are proud of our national health care program. Today our national program covers doctor care, most diagnostic services, hospital stays, and prescription drugs while in hospital. It does not cover the $28.5 billion that was spent on pharmacy-filled prescription drugs in 2015.

The Standing Committee on Health, of which I am a member, began a study of the development of a national pharmacare program in 2016. We have heard from dozens of witnesses, including patient advocates. We have heard from experts in medicine, social policy, constitutional law, and pharmaceutical manufacturing, as well as pharmacists and the insurance industry.

In September 2016, the House of Commons Standing Committee on Health asked the parliamentary budget officer to provide a cost estimate of implementing a national pharmacare program. The committee provided the program's framework. We included the inclusive list of drugs to be covered by pharmacare, based on Quebec's gold standard formulary; eligibility requirements; copayment levels; and eligibility requirements for copayment exemptions.

The committee received the report, which is a public document, on September 28, a short week ago. The paper estimates the cost to the federal government of implementing this particular framework for pharmacare. It incorporates assumptions of the potential savings resulting from a stronger position for drug price negotiations, consumption or behavioural responses of providing universal coverage, and potential changes in the composition of the drug market. (1310)

After accounting for pricing and consumption changes, the PBO estimates that total drug spending under a national pharmacare program would have amounted to $20.4 billion if the program had been implemented in 2015-16. This would have represented savings of roughly $4.2 billion on the actual expenditures, which I believe is a conservative estimate.

In 2015-16, $13.1 billion was paid by public insurance plans for prescriptions, while private insurance plans, mostly through private employers, covered $10.7 billion. These two existing coverage streams would cover the entire population of Canada with a national pharmacare program and yield savings back to the employers. This is a win-win scenario.

I agree fully with my NDP colleague that Canada needs to adopt a national pharmacare program. As a caring society, I believe all of us are interested in ensuring that no one in Canada has to go without essential prescription drugs. Why, then, as caring Canadians, would we not move immediately to adopt a national pharmacare program, as proposed in this motion?

As I mentioned earlier, the Standing Committee on Health has heard from many witnesses on this topic. We have heard that affordability is not the only challenge. There are other complexities that need to be considered. Should there be a formulary to decide what drugs are insured? Should the formulary be set nationally or set by each province and territory? How do we ensure that research and development continues in Canada and provide patent rights while ensuring that we can all access generic drugs to make the program affordable? Should there be a single-payer model, or would we continue with the multiple private insurance system? How would our model of federalism be applied?

There are many complexities around this issue. For example, the U.K. has created the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, whose role is to improve outcomes for people using the national health system and other public health and social care services. It produces evidence-based guidance and advice for health, public health, and social care practitioners, but, most importantly, it advises on the use of new and existing medicines, treatments, and procedures within the national health system. If we are to proceed with a national pharmacare model, we would need a corresponding scientific and evidence-based body to advise on what drugs should be in the insured plan.

The Standing Committee on Health is currently engaged in the final stages of its study of a national universal pharmacare system. We can bring recommendations on all of these complexities and on the cost model. The committee asked the PBO to prepare a report, given certain parameters, to guide the committee in its evaluation of policy options, and we are looking at options.

We have not even had the chance to meet with the PBO, examine his PBO's work, and ask about the assumptions and procedures used to produce the report. As a committee, we have not finished that work on this report. I strongly feel that it is premature for Parliament to call upon the government to act when the committee has not even drafted, let alone tabled, its report. I am disappointed that a valued member of the standing committee would rush to the House to table a motion asking Parliament to direct the government ahead of his own committee's report. Therefore, I say to my fellow committee member from Vancouver Kingsway that we should let the committee finish its work.

I also believe we need strong federal leadership to drive this change, starting with amendments to the Canada Health Act, and not just by initiating conversations with the provinces and territories, as is proposed in this motion. We need federal leadership on this issue.

For these reasons, I will be voting against the motion, but I want to be very clear on this issue to the residents of Oakville, my colleagues in the House, and those across Canada who are championing a push for national pharmacare: I fully support this initiative. One of the primary reasons I entered politics was to do my best to see that all Canadians are entitled to receive prescription drugs.

As I said earlier, all of us and our families face the risk of not being able to access essential medicines because we cannot afford them...”

Ms. Tracey Ramsey (Essex, NDP)

October 5th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...f our youth live in poverty, which means that in 2013, 19,900 children under the age of 17 lived in families that had an income of less than $17,000 per year. This is not only unacceptable; it is offe...”

Ms. Kamal Khera (Brampton West, Lib.)

October 5th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...ly announced in Bill C-6, will help residents of Brampton West and across Canada reunite with their families, contribute to our society, and reaffirm that a Canadian is a Canadian is a Canadian is a C...”

Mr. Jim Eglinski (Yellowhead, CPC)

October 5th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...n, support each other, and grieve together.

I want to offer my sincere condolences to all the families impacted by this tragedy.”

Mr. John Aldag (Cloverdale—Langley City, Lib.)

October 5th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...eaker, opioid-related overdoses have claimed almost 800 lives in B.C. so far this year, devastating families and communities throughout our province. These numbers would have no doubt been higher had ...”

Mrs. Sylvie Boucher (Beauport—Côte-de-Beaupré—Île d'Orléans—Charlevoix, CPC)

October 5th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... whatever it takes to fatten government coffers, even if it makes life incredibly difficult for the families who help our country prosper. If the Minister of Agriculture does not want to ensure the su...”

Mr. Earl Dreeshen (Red Deer—Mountain View, CPC)

October 5th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ld. Many gamble off farm earnings, cash out pensions early, and mortgage heavily to invest in their families' enterprises. They are constantly dealing with the volatility and the unpredictability of both markets and Mother Nature.

Unlike the Prime Minister and the Minister of Finance, these families cannot access million dollar trust funds. Instead, they continually risk all they have to p...”

Ms. Irene Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe, NDP)

October 5th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...obal markets. One hundred and seventy jobs will be lost, jobs that feed, clothe, and house Canadian families and sustain local communities. This is one more in a long line of closures that leaves sout...”

Mr. David Lametti (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development, Lib.)

October 5th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, our hearts go out to families and workers who are affected by such economic decisions.

On our part, as a government, we are trying to build the economy. We have succeeded in creating over 400,000 jobs in the last year. We are working through various ministries, including the ministry of Innovation, Science and Economic Development, and through regional development agencies to create jobs to create long-term employment to make sure this economy continues to grow on behalf of families and workers in southwestern Ontario.”

Mr. James Maloney (Etobicoke—Lakeshore, Lib.)

October 5th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... by Daesh.

In many communities across Canada, such as London, Calgary, Winnipeg, and Toronto, families are being reunited with friends and loved ones. Our government made a commitment to this Ho...”

Mr. Peter Julian (New Westminster—Burnaby, NDP)

October 5th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...here are seniors who do not have access to medication because they cannot afford to pay for it, and families that, because they do not have access to private pharmacare plans, have to effectively pay out of their pockets, if they can afford to. This is not an issue that is just sterile debate in the House of Commons. This really touches the heart and soul of Canadians' quality of life.

Today we have heard a lot of arguments from Liberal members of Parliament. They have consistently said that we should just wait. Their arguments would have a little more validity if it was not for the history of the Liberal Party on this issue.

In 1964, the Royal Commission on Health Services recommended that we have national pharmacare. The Liberals said that it was not ready yet, so we should wait. Fast forward to 1997, when we had the National Forum on Health. In 2002, there was the Royal Commission on the Future of Health Care in Canada, and in 2004, the premiers' consensus on pharmacare. In each of those periods, we had Liberal governments that said that they supported the principle of pharmacare but needed to wait. It was just not the right time to do it, for whatever reason.

Today the Liberal arguments are similar to what they were years and decades ago. Yet again we have Liberal MPs standing in the House of Commons saying that this is not important and we should wait. Unbelievably, now their excuse is that we have to wait for a committee report. Somehow Canadians should put aside that priority of putting in place a pharmacare plan that the vast majority of Canadians support, because Liberals on a committee want to wait to produce a report.

There would be credibility in that argument if for decades and decades Liberal MPs had not been standing in this same House saying exactly the same thing. In principle, they support pharmacare, but they have to wait for a royal commission or another royal commission. They have to wait for a committee or another committee or a budget. For decades Canadians have been forced to wait.

It would be almost humorous if it did not have such a profound impact on Canadians. If anyone here doubts how important this issue is to Canadian families and Canadians, they should step out of this House, go right across the lawn down to Welling...”

Mr. Peter Julian

October 5th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“... The issue at hand is whether we are going to bring in pharmacare for Canadians. They need it. Some families are desperate. Many seniors are desperate.

Let us just get it done. Let us vote yes o...”

Mrs. Cathy McLeod (Kamloops—Thompson—Cariboo, CPC)

October 5th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...ce the government will provide them toward eligible drug costs. It is available to single people or families. For example, if a person's net income for two years is $15,000 or less and they are regist...”

Mr. Jim Eglinski (Yellowhead, CPC)

October 5th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...uals meeting some eligibility requirements. Most of these plans typically cover seniors, low-income families, or individuals.

The health needs of each province's population, prescribing habits o...”

Ms. Linda Duncan (Edmonton Strathcona, NDP)

October 5th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...escriptions.

There are many Canadians who are working hard and diligently to look after their families, some with two or three jobs, and still they cannot afford to pay for medicine for their fa...”

Mr. Randall Garrison (Esquimalt—Saanich—Sooke, NDP)

October 5th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...ir medications because they cannot afford those costs? Are we on the side of big pharma, or working families, whose incomes might just be above the income limits for getting assistance, and they skip or reduce their medications in order to feed and clothe their kids and keep a roof over their heads? Are we on the side of big pharma, or veterans, who often have limits on their coverage and the kinds of things they need? They have served their country. We limit the amount of medication, in particular for those who have pain problems PTSD problems. Whose side are we on when they cannot afford to buy more medication?

We know that in our country there is a cholesterol drug that is commonly prescribed. It costs $143 a year in Canada, but only $15 a year in New Zealand. Why is that? It is because we have a mix of private programs that do not give us the purchasing power to get the best deal on drugs in our country.

We know that employers waste between $3 billion and $5 billion annually because of inefficiencies in managing drug costs in their private plans. We know that over the last 12 years, Canadian drug expenditures have increased by 184%, faster than any other country, including the United States. We know that small businesses quite often cannot afford to provide the coverage to their employees they would like to provide.

A universal pharmacare program would reduce costs for those small businesses who do provide those programs. It would also reduce time lost for those who cannot provide the programs when their employees take time off, sick because they cannot afford prescriptions. Of course, it would help small businesses with retention and recruitment of employees because they would no longer have to compete with the benefits that large corporations are able to offer.

Amidst all the other things we have heard in the House today, it comes down to that one simple question: whose side are we on in the House? If we are on the side of ordinary Canadians, working Canadians, retired Canadians, veterans, and low-income families, then we will proceed now to get started on the necessary negotiations with the provinces a...”

Mr. Simon Marcil (Mirabel, BQ)

October 4th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...right in the middle of a 100,000-acre field that the federal government had expropriated from 2,700 families who called the place home. Ten thousand people were exiled from fertile land. The federal government took our ancestors' land and paved the heck out of it.

Trudeau's airport sure was a thing of beauty, right up until the day the government spent millions tearing it down because there was nothing else they could do with it.

Now there is not much left save the descendants of the people who were dispossessed, and they are still fighting Ottawa for right of first refusal when their families' land is put up for sale. I think the government owes them that much at least, as well as a...”

Mr. Omar Alghabra (Mississauga Centre, Lib.)

October 4th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...their strength is remarkable. Through you, Mr. Speaker, I want to say this to the Boyle and Coleman families: Know that Joshua and Caitlan's freedom remains a priority for our government. Know that we...”

Hon. Alice Wong (Richmond Centre, CPC)

October 4th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...d is associated with fertility, rejuvenation, and gratitude for a bountiful harvest.

Tonight, families and loved ones will gather under the full moon to light beautiful lanterns, exchange gifts ...”

Mr. Bob Saroya (Markham—Unionville, CPC)

October 4th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...hip of the sun and moon and prayers for a good harvest. Today, the moon festival is an occasion for families to spend time together, eat festive food, including traditional mooncake, and enjoy Chinese...”

Mr. Geng Tan (Don Valley North, Lib.)

October 4th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“... Hill today to celebrate the mid-autumn festival, also known as the moon festival. It is a time for families and friends to reunite under a full moon, eat mooncakes, and enjoy time together. These fam...”

Ms. Sheila Malcolmson (Nanaimo—Ladysmith, NDP)

October 4th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...ent union in Nanaimo—Ladysmith, the riding I serve.

I salute the advocacy and strength of the families and indigenous women's organizations that have brought us to this point and have pushed for change. The United Nations Committee for the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women has condemned Canada for failing to end violence against indigenous women and girls. It is time to act to bring justice to families and survivors, and to end violence against indigenous women.”

Mr. Randy Boissonnault (Edmonton Centre, Lib.)

October 4th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...dmontonians and took the lives of Albertans and Canadians. My thoughts are with all of the affected families and friends.

The Minister of Infrastructure and Communities and I attended a vigil in...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

October 4th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...hiest 1%. We have delivered a Canada child benefit that gives more money to nine out of 10 Canadian families. The Conservatives voted against it.”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

October 4th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...t more money in the pockets of the middle class by not sending child benefit cheques to millionaire families. We did that, and that will be reducing child poverty by 40%, lifting hundreds of thousands...”

Mr. John Barlow (Foothills, CPC)

October 4th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... policy, but these unfair Liberal tax changes do not distinguish between hard-working Canadian farm families and real tax cheats. A new technical analysis of these changes show that over a 20-year period, the typical Canadian farm of 3,000 acres will pay $1.3 million in new Liberal taxes.

Why is the Prime Minister going after hard-working Canadian farm families to the tune of $1.3 million when his own family fortune is untouched?”

Ms. Sheila Malcolmson (Nanaimo—Ladysmith, NDP)

October 4th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ay as we honour the lives of murdered and missing indigenous women, girls, and two-spirited people, families and survivors are on the front steps of Parliament calling for justice.

The United Na...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

October 4th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... have committed as a government to work hard to end violence against women, to get healing for the families, to get justice for the victims and survivors, and to end this ongoing national tragedy.

Hon. Marc Garneau

October 4th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ine. This is an area where for millennia coastal nations have lived and worked and brought up their families. We have made a solemn commitment to do this and we are going to do it.

To say that w...”

Ms. Joyce Murray

October 4th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...n Grizzly Bear Sanctuary, this amazing and rich estuary, watching the grizzly bears feed with their families, as I had a chance to do. Imagine that being fouled with a crude oil spill, as happened in ...”

Hon. Andrew Scheer (Leader of the Opposition, CPC)

October 3rd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...ed on a promise to help the middle class. However, according to a recent study, 80% of middle-class families are now paying $800 more a year in taxes as a result of a series of tax hikes, which include an increase in payroll taxes and Canada pension plan premiums, the cancellation of many tax credits that families needed, and a lower TFSA contribution limit.

That is not all. The Liberals also impos...”

Mr. Alexandre Boulerice (Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, NDP)

October 3rd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“... loopholes of big CEOs, which is costing almost $800 million per year.

Why are they targeting families and small businesses but are leaving their friends on Bay Street safe and alone?”

Mr. Joël Lightbound (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance, Lib.)

October 3rd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...We introduced the Canada child benefit, which puts more money in the pockets of nine out of 10 families. The CCB is better targeted to the families who need it most, low- and middle-income Canadians. With payments delivered to eligible families every month, the CCB is helping lift approximately 300,000 children out of poverty in Canada. That represents a reduction of approximately in 40% in child poverty in 2017 from what it was just back in 2013. The introduction of the Canada child benefit represents the most significant social policy innovation in a generation.

The Canada child benefit is complemented by other initiatives to support children and families, such as the multilateral early learning and child care framework signed with the provinces...”

Mr. Alexandre Boulerice (Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, NDP)

October 3rd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“... of this government's term. They said they wanted to help the middle class and support middle-class families, but one of the first things they did was to adjust the tax rates in such a way as to completely leave out those earning less than $45,000 a year. That is the Liberal Party of Canada’s definition of middle class. They are completely out of touch; they rub shoulders with the rich and powerful, with Canada's most elite familes, and with folks from Bay Street, who do not consider people earning $30,000, $35,000 or $40,00 per year to be part of the middle class. These people will get absolutely nothing. It is not rocket science. Those earning over $180,000 per year, however, benefitted the most from the Liberal Party's tax changes. That is the difference between what the Liberal Party says and what it does. I would love it if the Liberals actually went out there and told people earning $20 or $21 per hour that they are not part of the middle class and that they do not need any help. I think those people would tell them, to their faces, that their position makes no sense.

They also told us that small and medium-sized businesses are very important and that they would drop their tax rate from 11% to 9% to help them out. Surprise! Nothing was done. This government has been in office for two years, and it has yet to take any action to help small entrepreneurs, families who set up small companies to earn living and support their families.

I know the situation small and medium-sized businesses are in. In a riding of 11 squ...”

Ms. Tracey Ramsey (Essex, NDP)

October 3rd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...my riding are also very proud to pay their taxes, to pay their fair share. They work hard for their families, their communities, their family traditions, and their family businesses and farms. They pay their fair share and they work to pay for the health of their community as well.

This summer when the consultations started, there was a lot of rhetoric being thrown around by the Liberal government about tax fairness. People in my riding were being told that they were cheating the system, that they were taking away from the community they love and helped to build, where they were raised and where they raised their children, instead of adding to it. Not only did they feel targeted by this language, but they were using a system that was in fact perfectly legal and one that they had been encouraged to use to grow.

They understand and support tax fairness, but the main question I get is why the Liberals brought in only these proposals in which they they are only looking at small businesses. Where was the consultation on CEO stock option loopholes, or the consultations on how we end offshoring and snow washing? The Panama papers came up quite a bit.

I understand why farmers and small business owners are angry. What I cannot understand is the Liberal government limiting the scope and the time of this debate in Canada. The government has many opportunities to bring forward real and tangible tax fairness.

I believe in tax fairness, but real tax fairness, not this limited version being proposed by the government.

Real tax fairness could have come when New Democrats stood in the House in March and introduced a motion to eliminate tax havens and the CEO stock option loophole. Why should CEOs be able to hide their salaries and stock options to keep from paying their fair share? The NDP proposed the elimination of the tax break on stock options used by rich CEOs, a loophole that costs the government and communities $800 million per year.

The government voted in favour of our motion but has done nothing to address the issue. I heard Liberals talking about the provisions in the budget that they brought forward, but they do not eliminate the loophole, and these are very different things.

Real tax fairness could have been accomplished by the Liberals if they had passed my colleague's private member's bill, Bill C-274. This legislation would have helped small business owners, like farm and fishing businesses, transfer between family members. We have a system in Canada where farmers pay less tax if they sell their family farm to a stranger than if they sell it to a family member. How on earth is that fair? Again, the government, which says on a constant basis how much it cares about farmers, voted against the bill, which would have made it fairer to succession plan, something that Canadian farm families are struggling with across the country.

I recently spoke with a farmer in my riding who told me that he and his wife had taken on payments to be able to buy the farm from his parents. They have a 16-year commitment to do this, and now they are very worried that they have made the wrong decision and will pay the price for the government's complete lack of understanding about farm management. This is not a multi-million dollar farmer. This is a family that is teaching its children how to farm and keeping our community in fresh local food. (1125)

Now, instead of using viable options to make our tax system fairer to tackle the real and serious problem of inequality, the government has put forward consultations, which are now over.

Income inequality in Canada is a real and serious issue for all. Recently, the census revealed that Canada's level of income inequality has worsened over the past 12 years. Due to past government inaction, the richest one per cent of our population has seen a 14% rise in median income. According to the census data, the richest one per cent now earns 6.8 times more than a worker earning Canada's median wage of $34,204 in 2015. The changes that the government is consulting on would do nothing to alleviate this gap. In the Windsor Essex area, the United Way says that about one-quarter of our youth live in poverty, which means that in 2013, 19,900 children under the age of 17 lived in families where the income was less than $17,000 per year.

We need to address this gap and work...”

Mr. Mark Warawa

October 3rd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“... taxation would be far lower if a foreign entity bought them out. This kind of taxation discourages families from passing on a company they have built up over decades to the next generation. It stops ...”

Mr. Jean-Claude Poissant (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food, Lib.)

October 3rd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...ents; accidents; contagious diseases that swept through the herd; and all the financial stress farm families deal with.

That is why I am pleased to rise to speak to tax fairness for all Canadian...”

Mrs. Alaina Lockhart (Parliamentary Secretary for Small Business and Tourism, Lib.)

October 3rd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...reate good, well-paying jobs. We know just how hard these business owners work to provide for their families.

It is worth remembering that two-thirds of businesses in Canada earn less than $73,0...”

Hon. Kevin Sorenson (Battle River—Crowfoot, CPC)

October 3rd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“... rural riding, access to a doctor is of great concern to a lot of seniors, the aging community, and families. I would ask the member to tell me her experience in listening to her constituents.”

Mrs. Cheryl Gallant

October 3rd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...at the Liberals have done.

As soon as they were elected, they took income splitting away from families with young children. Now they are trying to take away income sharing from family farms. Far...”

Mrs. Karen Vecchio (Elgin—Middlesex—London, CPC)

October 3rd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“... business.

As I continue with this, the letters and emails have been pouring in from Canadian families, but I specifically looked at only the people from Elgin—Middlesex—London, which includes t...”

Mr. Shaun Chen (Scarborough North, Lib.)

October 3rd
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...s, light lanterns, and admire the beauty of the full moon, its brightness and roundness a symbol of families coming together.

Last Saturday, I joined constituents in my riding of Scarborough Nor...”

Mrs. Sherry Romanado (Longueuil—Charles-LeMoyne, Lib.)

October 3rd
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...and rugby events. Ultimately, what counts is the spirit of the games. These men and women and their families are the real Canadian heroes.[English]

I am the master of my fate: I am the captain o...”

Mr. Blake Richards (Banff—Airdrie, CPC)

October 3rd
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...t Loss Awareness Day. This day helps us remember the lives of all infants who were taken from their families too soon. It also encourages support and compassion for parents who have suffered this tragedy.

Sarah and Lee Cormier of Airdrie told me about losing their daughter, Quinn, at four months of age from SIDS. Shortly after, Service Canada told the Cormiers that they had to pay back their parental benefits for the time period after Quinn's passing. Families may not have even had time to lay their child to rest before being forced to return to work, due to financial hardships. I have since met many families who face the same problems, highlighting a serious flaw in our system.

Therefore, I p...”

Mr. Alexandre Boulerice (Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, NDP)

October 3rd
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“Mr. Speaker, even as tonnes of good food end up in the trash because of food waste, many families cannot afford fruits and vegetables because of rising food costs.

What can people do about this? They can do like the Centre de ressources et d'action communautaire de La Petite-Patrie, which recovers food from the Jean-Talon market. This new program, in partnership with Marchés publics de Montréal and the Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie borough, recovered 21 tonnes of food in just five months.

According to the centre's Maggie Lebeau, this makes fruits and vegetables available to about 100 families and individuals every week.

I would like to congratulate the people of La Petite-Patr...”

Mrs. Karen Vecchio (Elgin—Middlesex—London, CPC)

October 3rd
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...Currently in Canada, over 10,000 children are undergoing treatment and approximately another 1,700 families will be given this devastating diagnosis annually.

Last month was Childhood Cancer Awareness Month, but these families must face the challenges of cancer every day.

I would like to share an excerpt from a...”

Ms. Marjolaine Boutin-Sweet (Hochelaga, NDP)

October 2nd
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...The crisis is a fact, and it affects the most vulnerable members of our society: single-parent families, seniors, immigrants, and people with disabilities. Then there is the harsh reality of the ...”

Mr. T.J. Harvey (Tobique—Mactaquac, Lib.)

October 2nd
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“... the oldest population in Canada, making it increasingly important to ensure that seniors and their families have access to the information, key services, and programs available in their communities. ...”

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes (Whitby, Lib.)

October 2nd
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...tands with our friends in Edmonton and the United States. Our thoughts and condolences are with the families and friends of those who were killed and injured and those affected by these senseless acts...”

Mr. James Bezan (Selkirk—Interlake—Eastman, CPC)

October 2nd
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“Mr. Speaker, today we share the profound grief of families in the United States and Canada following the horrific and senseless shootings in Las Vegas last night.

As information continues to come in, we are learning about Canadians who were involved in this tragic event. Families are feeling the immense loss of losing loved ones, including Canadian families. Our thoughts and prayers are with them. Many more families are facing injuries to loved ones. Such senseless violence leaves the entire world in disbelief.

Two of my constituents were in Las Vegas at the concert when the attack began. I am shocked and saddened to learn that Jody Ansell and Jan Lambourne were shot during the horrific attack in Las Vegas last night. Jan is a friend of mine. Both are being treated for their wounds, and we are all pulling for them.

I want to extend my gratitude to all the first responders for doing everything in their power to bring the attack to an end and for assisting the victims. As we mourn for the victims and their families, all Canadians will come together to denounce this callous act of violence.

On behalf of the loyal opposition, and indeed all parliamentarians, I want to offer sincere condolences to all families impacted by this senseless act.”

Hon. Andrew Leslie (Orléans, Lib.)

October 2nd
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...palling. I join all members of this House in offering thoughts and prayers to the victims and their families. Our condolences and thoughts are with all those affected. Global Affairs Canada is followi...”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

October 2nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“.... We have listened to people who want to save within their businesses for taking time off for their families. Our goal is to make sure that as we consider how we move forward on these measures that ar...”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

October 2nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ill be in a positive situation to continue their investments in their farms and continue with their families on their farms after these measures move forward.”

Mr. John Barlow (Foothills, CPC)

October 2nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... to operate a family farm. It seems that the Liberal government looks at hard-working Canadian farm families as nothing more than wealthy tax cheats. That is simply not true.

The minister promis...”

Ms. Brigitte Sansoucy (Saint-Hyacinthe—Bagot, NDP)

October 2nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...seasonal workers in New Brunswick and across Canada will be left without an income to support their families. Instead of solving this problem once and for all, the Liberals are asking them to wait for...”

Hon. Jean-Yves Duclos (Minister of Families, Children and Social Development, Lib.)

October 2nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ent insurance system for guaranteeing income security, a certain degree of social certainty for our families and workers, and access to jobs all across the country, at a time of difficult economic con...”

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs (Lakeland, CPC)

October 2nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ves the project is in jeopardy.

Will the Prime Minister stand up for energy workers and their families, and make sure energy east gets built?”

Mr. Bill Blair (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada, Lib.)

October 2nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... bring down prescription drug prices in Canada and the important work being done by the Minister of Families, Children and Social Development, demonstrates a clear commitment by this government to the...”

Mrs. Kelly Block (Carlton Trail—Eagle Creek, CPC)

October 2nd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... on real people.

Millions of dollars that could have gone to first nation communities and the families they represent will now never reach them. The affected communities could have used this mon...”

Mr. James Bezan

October 2nd
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...s abusers in their countries to account and ensure that they do not hide their money or bring their families and protect them here in Canada, and that we do not allow Canada to be used as a safe haven. I thank all of them for their support, petitions, and advocacy and holding seminars and spreading the world about how important Bill S-226 is.

As I said, this legislation is about anti-corruption. It is about protecting human rights and protecting Canadian values. It is really not just about sanctions and travel bans; it is about ensuring that Canada cannot be used as a safe haven by those criminals. By all accounts, as corrupt government officials and human rights abusers, these individuals are criminals. Each and every one of them should be held to account in The Hague at the International Criminal Court. Until that happens and until the proper investigations take place, we have to ensure that Canada is doing its part in lock step with the rest of the international community to ensure that we are not used to educate these criminals' children, to hide their families and their extra-marital affairs here in Canada, to buy homes and properties over here, or to make use of our very strong banking system.

I know some of the research that has been done shows that we have already been able to uncover oligarchs from Russia who have hidden money here in Canada and essentially used a shell game to clean their money before taking it back to Russia. Russian oligarchs have abused their authority to enrich themselves, to commit tax fraud, and other devious schemes to acquire money from the citizens of Russia, or elsewhere for that matter. (1735)

We know they would love to put their money in trusted banks like we have here in Canada, rather than being in Russian banks that are often sanctioned because of the Russian aggression in Ukraine, Georgia, and elsewhere, due to their support for Vladimir Putin's expansionist adventurism.

As I said earlier, there are other countries that have already passed Magnitsky-style legislation. The United States did it in 2012. Last year, the United States made sure that the Sergei Magnitsky law became a global Magnitsky law. It was not just about Russia, but other countries that are human rights abusers, with the people getting rich by being human rights abusers, which is atrocious.

We also know that the European Parliament passed it in 2013, Estonia in 2016, the United Kingdom passed it earlier this year, and Canada needs to get this done so that it falls in line. All three main parties, as I have said in the House before, all supported Magnitsky-style legislation in the 2015 campaign. This is about the three main parties all coming together, supporting this legislation, and bringing it into reality.

People are probably asking why we need this. Are we not already sanctioning officials, Russian oligarchs and Ukrainian oligarchs, responsible for the violence in Donbass and the illegal annexation and occupation of Crimea? The current government and the previous Conservative government have already sanctioned what I think are over 250 individuals and entities, and travel bans have been put in place. However, that only applies to the situation in Donbass and Crimea. It does not speak to the broader context of all of the different abuses taking place in Russia, or any other country, for that matter. Right now the way that the Special Economic Measures Act works is that other international organizations have to direct Canada and member states to sanction because of a certain conflict or issue, saying that we are going to put in place travel bans and economic sanctions.

Bill S-226 would put another tool in the tool box for the Government of Canada, so that we can project our Canadian values and ensure that Canada is not being used as a safe haven by corrupt foreign officials and human rights abusers. This would enable Canada to go after other countries and entities that are human rights abusers. It is not just about Russian aggression and the war in Ukraine. It is not just about Crimea's illegal annexation. This is also about the torture of political prisoners in places like Iran, the human rights abuses that we have seen in Vietnam, and the current genocide that is taking place in Myanmar with the Rohingyas.

This would give the authority to the Government of Canada to act unilaterally in the interests of Canada to stop these types of human rights abuses, send the signal that corrupt officials will not get away with it, that Canada is taking notice, and that Canada and its partners will ensure that we shut down their ability to launder their money, hide their families, and enrich themselves by benefiting from Canada's strong financial institutions and assets...”

Mr. James Bezan (Selkirk—Interlake—Eastman, CPC)

October 2nd
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“... those corrupt foreign officials who abuse their power and authority to enrich themselves and their families.

I also thank the Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs and International Development...”

Mr. Jean Rioux (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of National Defence, Lib.)

October 2nd
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“...ion together.

As a former reservist, the minister understands the needs of soldiers and their families perfectly well. During his years of service in Canada or in deployment overseas, he was able to see firsthand how our soldiers are by far our greatest asset. When he took office nearly two years ago, he was well aware of the huge job ahead of him. Every day, he puts his field experience, his expertise, and his energy to work for our men and women in uniform and their families.

He has worked tirelessly to deliver on the long list of priorities that the Prime Minister set out in his mandate letter. The Minister of National Defence intends to ensure that our military personnel are well trained, highly qualified, and properly compensated for the work they do. He intends to ensure that our military personnel and their families have access to the services and support they need in times of trouble. He intends to ensure smooth transitions from civilian to military life and vice versa. He is working to increase recruitment into both the regular and reserve forces. He wants the Canadian Armed Forces to reflect our society. He is a champion for greater diversity, and he is making sure that each and every member of the Canadian Armed Forces is treated with dignity and respect no matter what.

He oversaw the initiation and development of a major consultation process, the largest in 20 years, which resulted in a new credible, realistic, and fully funded defence policy for our armed forces. We put our troops and their families at the heart of this policy by making sure they get the care, support, training, and resour...”

Mr. Jean Rioux

October 2nd
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“...y a success. This policy has been very warmly welcomed, as I have learned from the troops and their families. The men and women of the armed forces and their families are at the core of the policy. It addresses training, equipment, and health and wellness, as well as the transition from military to civilian life.

We recognize the service and sacrifice of our men and women in uniform and their families.”

Mr. Jean-Claude Poissant (La Prairie, Lib.)

September 29th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“... ensure that Canada's food system fully contributes to our economy and especially the well-being of families.”

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs (Lakeland, CPC)

September 29th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“... what can be done. ... I know that we aren't the only place.”

This is happening to vulnerable families and businesses everywhere in Lakeland, at all hours of the night and in broad daylight. Peo...”

Mr. Mark Strahl (Chilliwack—Hope, CPC)

September 29th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...tax-change plan. It is very simple. Mom-and-pop shop owners lose. Family-run restaurants lose. Farm families lose. Big Bay Street firms, like the finance minister's own Morneau Shepell, they win. Clea...”

Mr. Mark Strahl (Chilliwack—Hope, CPC)

September 29th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...t have any taxpayer-funded nannies. The small-business owners in my riding are middle-class working families that work hard, take risks, and make sacrifices to put food on their tables and to support our community. Why should these families pay more while the minister and the Prime Minister protect their own family fortunes from t...”

Mr. John Brassard (Barrie—Innisfil, CPC)

September 29th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...nd all they see from the government is fiscal uncertainty. They worry for their employees and their families. Will kids be able to go to university, or will they have to settle for less? What choices ...”

Ms. Irene Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe, NDP)

September 29th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...jobs are currently threatened with relocation to Mexico. The jobs that are at risk sustain workers' families and the region, and these good manufacturing jobs sustain this country. They must be kept i...”

Ms. Leona Alleslev (Aurora—Oak Ridges—Richmond Hill, Lib.)

September 29th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... see our government introduce the Canada child benefit in budget 2016. This is a great help for the families in my riding of Aurora—Oak Ridges—Richmond Hill.

Could the minister inform us on the ...”

Mr. Dave MacKenzie (Oxford, CPC)

September 29th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...adam Speaker, the new Liberal tax hikes on local businesses are set to make life very hard for farm families, young entrepreneurs, and local business operators.

Why did the Minister of Finance design a system in which farmers and local businesses in my riding will pay significantly higher taxes, while the family fortunes of the Prime Minister and Minister of Finance will not be touched?

How is this fair for hardworking Canadians and their families?”

Ms. Anne Minh-Thu Quach (Salaberry—Suroît, NDP)

September 29th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Madam Speaker, it takes so long for the Canada Revenue Agency to deal with files, that families in my riding are losing up to six or seven months of benefits before receiving anything. That is completely unacceptable. These families are already struggling to make ends meet, and the CRA is making things worse for them. Perhaps the Liberals should wake up before we have another catastrophe like Phoenix on our hands. The federal government has been boasting about so-called investments in the CRA.

Will the government hire more staff to meet the needs of families and individuals who are struggling to earn a decent living?”

Mr. Dan Vandal (Saint Boniface—Saint Vital, Lib.)

September 29th
Hansard Link

Routine Proceedings

“...at has negatively impacted constituents in my riding, as well as many ridings throughout Canada, as families work hard to rebuild their lives.

It is an honour to submit this petition to the Hous...”

Mr. Colin Carrie

September 29th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...s of industries in these communities? What kind of effect does the member think it will have on the families who really rely on the fisheries for their livelihood?”

Mr. Colin Carrie (Oshawa, CPC)

September 29th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...re was no consultation with local politicians, businesses, or stakeholders. This is going to affect families in my community, job creators, and businesses.

The Liberals are consistently putting artificial political timelines and ideology ahead of local interests and families. This seems to be the rule, not the exception. We have also seen it with their apparent con...”

Mr. Mark Warawa (Langley—Aldergrove, CPC)

September 29th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... time if it is done right.

In the middle of summer, when people were enjoying time with their families after working hard and paying increasing Liberal taxes, we had an announcement that there w...”

Mr. Garnett Genuis (Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan, CPC)

September 28th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ome of us get together over drinks or to play sports, some Canadians enjoy spending time with their families and friends at the range or out hunting. For some people, guns are also an important part of their family history. In these cases, making it harder for people to possess their guns means we are trying to take away people's valuable family heirlooms.

I ask the government to think about these gun owners, people whom we might not have met but who do not deserve to be judged on the basis of uninformed stereotypes. Liberals, who supposedly champion diversity and openness to experience, should be open to learning about the legitimate aspirations of firearms owners, aspirations that can be effectively and responsibly integrated with a commitment to public safety.

With that in mind, in the remaining time I have, I will read at some length an essay written by one of my constituents who is a firearms owners. He asked that I share this anonymously. He writes the following:

I am the gun owner that is a loving husband and father, I raised great kids and still love my high school sweetheart 27 years later.

I am the gun owner that deplores violence, I respect the police and the law. I fly a Canadian flag in my yard.

I am the gun owner that is a sports coach, a community leader, an involved parent, and the father that booked off work for all those field trips with our kids when others were busy.

I am that gun owner that stopped on that icy highway and brought your wife and child to safety from their stuck car on a cold night....

I am that gun owner that has a successful business, employs people with good jobs and fair wages. I am the gun owner that ensures respect, fairness and proper treatment of people, I speak out against harassment and racism.

I am that gun owner that believes firearms safety and training are paramount to have a successful firearms policy in our country.

I am the gun owner that stores his firearms properly and safely, respects the privilege of owning firearms, and is a respected and committed member of the community, that cares deeply about the safety of your children and mine.

I am the gun owner that lives on your street, down the alley or at the end of the block, I am the one that waves, pushes your car when you are stuck, and my kids and I are the ones that shovelled those neighbors driveways when they needed help, someone passed away or a neighbour fell ill.

I am the gun owner that has firearms for sports shooting and hunting and recreation, my firearms have been passed from generation to generation, my firearms are of all types and many are well over a hundred years old, they have never been used in anger or against another. They are my family history, heirlooms and always used safely and with respect for my family, neighbors and friends. Many belonged to my great-grandfather, grandfather and father....

I am the gun owner who is proud, and enjoys the wonderful people I have met in the firearms community, my dear friends they have become, they are good people worthy of my friendship.

I am the gun owner, that should not be blamed for gang violence, smuggled and stolen firearms, failed public policy not holding criminals responsible for their actions, or drugs in our community. I am responsible for none of these things. But if I was the Public Safety Minister, I would take real action against these plagues on our communities.

I am the gun owner that believes the Government should focus on passing legislation like Wynn's Law, that would make criminal history mandatory at bail hearing's so that if suspects are released into our communities, the Justice releasing them is aware of the risks to our families, our communities and our police officers....

I am the gun owner that requests your su...”

Mr. Colin Fraser (West Nova, Lib.)

September 28th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...ich will commemorate the many local fishers who have lost their lives while trying to support their families back on dry land.[Translation]

I want to congratulate the committee, which was so ins...”

Hon. Andrew Scheer (Leader of the Opposition, CPC)

September 28th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... the media would not be paying attention and when MPs were not in Ottawa. He did so even before the families of Omar Khadr's victims had a chance to testify in court. He did everything he could to kee...”

Hon. Andrew Scheer (Leader of the Opposition, CPC)

September 28th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...are outraged over this. They are outraged that he completely ignored Omar Khadr's victims and their families. They are outraged that Omar Khadr received $10.5 million of their money while the Prime Mi...”

Hon. Andrew Scheer (Leader of the Opposition, CPC)

September 28th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...d tax revenue from the 1% by over a billion dollars, and he has raised taxes on 81% of middle-class families who are paying almost $1,000 more per year because of him.

Why is it that every time ...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

September 28th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...next thing we did was bring in a Canada child benefit that gives more money to 9 out of 10 Canadian families by not sending child benefit cheques to millionaires, a program that will lift hundreds of ...”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

September 28th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...easure for people across the country. We introduced the Canada child benefit, which has helped both families and the economy. Now that we have a growing economy, it is very important to have a fair ta...”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

September 28th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...p one per cent; introducing the Canada child benefit; creating a great situation for nine out of 10 families; and helping our economy at the same time. We are going to make sure our tax system is fair...”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

September 28th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...le class. As well, we are going to make sure that businesses that have created jobs that are within families can be transferred from one generation to the next. That is true for farmers, and that is t...”

Mr. Yves Robillard (Marc-Aurèle-Fortin, Lib.)

September 28th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ken to support public transit in Laval in order to improve the quality of life of workers and their families, who use it every day?”

Mr. Peter Schiefke (Vaudreuil—Soulanges, Lib.)

September 27th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...will be celebrating its 20th annual Festival des couleurs.

The festival is an opportunity for families, friends, and all those who form a part of our community to come together to celebrate the ...”

Mr. Bob Saroya (Markham—Unionville, CPC)

September 27th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...idents of Markham—Unionville who are concerned about what these new tax changes will mean for their families. Many local business owners and professionals will be meeting this Sunday to discuss the go...”

Mr. Ken Hardie (Fleetwood—Port Kells, Lib.)

September 27th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...doubled in the last 10 years. We also know about the financial and emotional hardships it brings to families. We need to hear their voices on the way forward, which is why I will be holding a town hal...”

Mr. Angelo Iacono (Alfred-Pellan, Lib.)

September 27th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“... affected by this form of dementia.

This disease is life-altering to those affected and their families. Research into preventing the disease continues.

I want to take this opportunity to acknowledge the work of the Alzheimer Society Laval in Alfred-Pellan. That organization works tirelessly to help and support people affected by Alzheimer's disease. It also provides respite care and accommodation to help the families. Its work deserves our utmost admiration.

Thank you and continued success to Alzheime...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

September 27th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...the wealthiest 1%. We then delivered a Canada child benefit that would help nine out of 10 Canadian families with the high cost of raising their kids by not sending those benefits to millionaire families.”

Hon. Andrew Scheer (Leader of the Opposition, CPC)

September 27th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, so many families in Atlantic Canada rely on local businesses—”

Mr. Alain Rayes (Richmond—Arthabaska, CPC)

September 27th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, the reality is that 81% of middle class families pay more taxes today than they did under the previous Conservative government. Now the Prim...”

Hon. Candice Bergen (Portage—Lisgar, CPC)

September 27th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... is a pattern with the Prime Minister talking about himself. He takes away child care benefits from families across Canada saying wealthy families like his do not need help with their child care. Then, he gets two full-time nannies paid f...”

Mr. Mark Strahl (Chilliwack—Hope, CPC)

September 27th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...nance minister, and their family fortunes will remain untouched.

Why should hard-working farm families see their taxes increase, when the wealthy elites, like this Prime Minister, will continue ...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

September 27th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, if the members opposite want to talk about how Canadian families are doing, they need to acknowledge the Canada child benefit, which the Fraser Institute completely overlooked. The Canada child benefit delivers more money to nine out of 10 Canadian families, and it has been doing so for over a year now. Not only is it lifting hundreds of thousands of kids out of poverty across this country, reducing child poverty by 40%, but it is also creating growth in our economy by putting more money in the pockets of the middle-class families who need it. These are the things we are doing that the Conservatives never did, and that t...”

Mr. Todd Doherty (Cariboo—Prince George, CPC)

September 27th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...tricted? These are things that have not been communicated to the communities and to the fishers and families that depend on this industry for their livelihoods.

Once this interim protection is i...”

Mr. Rodger Cuzner (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour, Lib.)

September 27th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“... going through medical treatment or for an aging family member. This will benefit workers and their families.

We know that new and growing families across this country need support to help balance work and the needs of their families. One of the first actions we took as a government was introducing the Canada child benefit, which puts more money in the pockets of nine out of 10 families, helping lift hundreds of thousands of children out of poverty.

Through budget 2017, ...”

Mr. Luc Berthold (Mégantic—L'Érable, CPC)

September 26th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...r of Finance ask his Agriculture and Agri-Food colleague how his proposed changes would affect farm families across Canada?

Unfortunately, I do not know the answer to that because I do not have ...”

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux (Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons, Lib.)

September 26th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ossible, to give the benefit of the doubt to those family members so they are able to be with their families in Canada during those celebrations and otherwise. The officials often could not quantify i...”

Mrs. Stephanie Kusie (Calgary Midnapore, CPC)

September 26th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...ans to upgrade her equipment.

These people are not the 1%; they are hard-working middle-class families trying to make a living, which is becoming increasingly difficult under the Liberal governm...”

Hon. Hedy Fry (Vancouver Centre, Lib.)

September 26th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...ia, it impacts an estimated 56,000 people.

The good news is that in B.C. there is a place for families to go so they do not feel alone in their struggle. I am excited to tell the House about the work of the Pacific Autism Family Network and its newest autism hub in Richmond.

This provincial centre of excellence unites research, treatment and support for those affected by autism. Through spoke centres, it connects families, organizations and researchers in communities across the province.

I commend the founder, Wendy Lisogar-Cocchia, for her vision and commitment to this cause, and the members of the Pacific Autism Family Network team for their dedication in improving the lives of families with autism.”

Hon. Andrew Scheer (Leader of the Opposition, CPC)

September 26th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...tent that it cannot even raise taxes properly.

A new report confirms that 81% of middle-class families are paying more in taxes under the Liberals, but he admits that his new changes will not to...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

September 26th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...at new report completely overlooked the Canada child benefit. We are giving nine out of 10 Canadian families more money every single month for the high cost of raising their kids. The way we are doing that is by not sending it to wealthy families, like the Leader of the Opposition's or mine. We are giving it to the families who need the help. The way we are doing that is actually having an impact on Canadians righ...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

September 26th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ing we did was bring in the Canada child benefit, which gives more money to nine out of 10 Canadian families for the high cost of raising their kids, but it is only nine out of 10 Canadian families, because the wealthiest families no longer receive Canada child benefits, unlike what the Conservative government previously...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

September 26th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, we need a system that is fair for everyone. The current system encourages wealthy families to actually use private corporations to pay a lower tax rate than middle-class Canadians. T...”

Mrs. Sylvie Boucher (Beauport—Côte-de-Beaupré—Île d'Orléans—Charlevoix, CPC)

September 26th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...me broken record. The Liberals are insulting farmers with their inane one-liner. The farmers, their families, and the people in my riding who purchase our high-quality local products at reasonable pri...”

Mr. Mark Strahl (Chilliwack—Hope, CPC)

September 26th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, for generations, family farms have been the heart and soul of my community. Farming families work side by side and share in the risks and rewards of making their farms a success. That ...”

Ms. Rachel Blaney (North Island—Powell River, NDP)

September 25th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...xperiences. A home is more than a physical space. Housing is intrinsic to the sense of security for families and stability needed to prevent marginalization. All of us look to home as an anchor in our...”

Mrs. Karen Vecchio (Elgin—Middlesex—London, CPC)

September 25th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...te big talk and flowery language, the government's money has not made much of an impact on Canadian families. Communities are not getting the funding the government promised. The PBO's report even says that it does not expect that the federal government will spend all the money on housing and infrastructure investment that has been promised.

More directly related to housing, the government has further burdened young Canadians who are working hard and aspiring to home ownership by tightening the rules for obtaining a mortgage. What is more troubling about this move by the government is that it was done without engaging any stakeholders, including young Canadians. It will push home ownership more out of reach for Canadians and will not help affordability at all.

To summarize, the government has tightened rules, requiring Canadians to pay more for a mortgage while simultaneously pickpocketing Canadian families through tax hikes, debt, deficits, and credit eliminations, not to mention slamming a carbo...”

Ms. Marjolaine Boutin-Sweet (Hochelaga, NDP)

September 25th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...ortage of rental housing units, the lack of federal government funding for social housing, too many families spending over 30% of their income on housing, and increasing homelessness are only a few ex...”

Mr. Murray Rankin (Victoria, NDP)

September 25th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...dians have a right to housing as a place of refuge and a sense of security for themselves and their families. Therefore, we ask that the Canadian Bill of Rights be amended to include the internationally recognized right to housing, which should be at the heart of any national housing strategy the government is anticipating. We have heard about this strategy and on this side fervently hope that it is not simply a case of platitudes piled upon platitudes but real action in the short term. I say this because in the 2017 budget, the Liberals promised over $11 billion over 11 years, with 90% of that funding allocated after the next election, should they be re-elected.

I live in a community with a housing crises that is an emergency. Therefore, words do not do enough. The money is nowhere to be found in my community, and we have to get serious about this issue. As my time is limited, I will start with the specifics in Victoria, British Columbia.

Every day we have people come into our constituency office who are concerned about this crisis. It has meant that our city is now ranked among the most expensive places to buy housing in Canada. For those who live in Victoria, the high cost of purchasing a home remains a barrier to so many people. The reality facing those looking for an affordable place to rent is also a daunting problem.

In addition to the homelessness crises in our community, many of our working poor are barely able to make ends meet. That was confirmed by a recent research study by the United Way. Renter households face far greater housing affordability challenges and hardships. They have lower incomes and pay a larger proportion of their income for housing than owners do. Victoria has one of the lowest vacancy rates of rental properties across this country. The Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation listed the vacancy rate for rentals in Victoria at a shocking 0.6% last fall.

How people can afford housing and rent is a serious mystery to many of us. It is simply an affordability challenge. Paired with the extremely low vacancy rate I spoke of, securing suitable accommodations is virtually impossible for many people in our community. The rents are so high that people who are working for minimum wage are often simply unable to afford a place to live should they be able to find one.

To better understand the situation, we should consider the CMHC's discussion of what it terms “core housing need”. If a family spends more than 30% of its income on housing, it is said to have a core housing need. Therefore, as the cost of rent remains high, far too many Victorians experience a core housing need. Of Victoria's renters, almost half spent more than 30% of their income on shelter in 2011, and a quarter spent more than 50% of their income on housing.

Our constituency office has been deluged with people struggling with this reality. My office is currently working with Beth, for example, one of many seniors who can no longer afford her rent after she separated from her partner. We work with young families who have no money left at the end of each month for contingencies given how much they pay for housing. They could find themselves in dire financial straits if they had to cover an unforseen emergency, take their child to a dental appointment, suddenly require vehicle maintenance, or even purchase new shoes for their child. Those examples could put people in a state of housing crisis. We feel the stress of our constituents daily.

This also has a disproportionate impact on our indigenous population. According to our local newspaper earlier this year, the Times Colonist, indigenous people in Victoria made up 21% of shelter users experiencing chronic homelessness despite making up just 4.1% of the population. (1200)

Across Canada, almost one in two senior-led households faces rent affordability challenges, and affordable housing options for seniors are very limited. Senior women who live alone are much more likely to live in poverty than senior men. We find that to be very much a fact of life in our community as well.

The housing crisis is having an enormous impact on our business sector as well, because people cannot afford to live where the jobs are. We hear that every day from our chamber of commerce and other local business groups that are struggling to attract and retain talented people, because prospective employees simply cannot find affordable, suitable places to live in Victoria. Without adequate staff, business owners are afraid of losing their livelihoods.

This past spring, CTV did a story about students in Victoria who, faced with the exorbitant cost of accommodations, had to drop out of university. Some live in their vehicles to try to stay at university.

The housing crisis affects people from young to old; indigenous and non-indigenous; people who rent; people who are living on fixed wages, often minimum wage; and even young families who are trying to get a foothold to purchase in the housing market. It has simply become unaffordable. This is shocking in a country like Canada.

I have not spoken adequately in the time available about those living in homelessness, but we have estimated that there are 1,500 homeless people in the greater Victoria area today, according to the City of Victoria's recent statistics. These circumstances are simply unacceptable in a country as wealthy as ours.

As Canadians hear about the housing hardship in my riding and elsewhere in Canada, does it sound like the federal government is ensuring their right to adequate housing? I do not think so. The seniors I spoke of, the young families, local business owners, indigenous people, students, and the homeless are in crisis now. Th...”

Ms. Linda Duncan (Edmonton Strathcona, NDP)

September 25th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...ssage to the Minister of Health and to Parliament. She speaks for a network of Canadian mothers and families whose loved ones have died from opioid use or who could have hope of recovery.

I enco...”

Mr. Murray Rankin (Victoria, NDP)

September 25th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...s, I say Shana tova u’metuka to the vibrant Jewish community in my riding of Victoria and to Jewish families all across Canada. May they have a sweet year filled with happiness and good health.”

Mr. John Barlow (Foothills, CPC)

September 25th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, dozens of farm and ranch families came to an open house in High River yesterday to loudly voice their concerns with these pun...”

Hon. Lawrence MacAulay (Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food, Lib.)

September 25th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...nsult with the farmers to make sure it is easier for farmers to transfer their family farm to their families.”

Mr. John Barlow (Foothills, CPC)

September 25th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ter that will devastate rural communities across Canada.

She and dozens of other Alberta farm families left their combines in the middle of harvest to come to a town hall in High River and voice...”

Mr. Luc Berthold (Mégantic—L'Érable, CPC)

September 25th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, I have had it with that speech in the House. Farmers and their families are honest people who deserve to be treated as such by their government and their Minister ...”

Hon. Carolyn Bennett (Minister of Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs, Lib.)

September 25th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ldren in the child welfare system. We believe that transformation requires investments in children, families, and communities, not in lawyers, agencies, and non-indigenous foster families.

The MSR was critical to understanding the needs of communities in order to overhaul ...”

Mr. Robert Aubin (Trois-Rivières, NDP)

September 25th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...dard on the presence of pyrrhotite.

When will the government finally do something to help the families who are caught in the grey area?”

Hon. Jean-Yves Duclos (Minister of Families, Children and Social Development, Lib.)

September 25th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...e took office, we implemented important measures to keep one of our promises and to ensure that the families affected by the situation are treated respectfully and their concerns are addressed in a timely manner.

We are pleased that things have improved since then, and we continue to listen, so that our government can continue to make Canadian families and their housing conditions a priority.”

Mr. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, CPC)

September 22nd
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“... Ottawa knows better than these small business owners how a tax increase will impact them and their families and their small businesses.

They are not the wealthy Bay Street tycoons, as the finan...”

Hon. Erin O'Toole (Durham, CPC)

September 22nd
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...peting in the games.[English]

These games would not be possible without the support of loving families, sponsors, and volunteers. I want to thank them all for their passion.

I also want to thank my good friend Michael Burns, who has dedicated the last decade of his life to military families and veterans. From True Patriot Love to running the Invictus Games, Michael is making such a positive impact on the lives of military families. I am proud that our alma mater, Dalhousie University, is recognizing his work with an hono...”

Mr. Joël Godin (Portneuf—Jacques-Cartier, CPC)

September 22nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...erals' tax reform takes effect, he is going to transfer his company abroad, putting 24 middle-class families out of work. This reform will have major collateral damage for the middle class.

Will...”

Mr. Arnold Viersen (Peace River—Westlock, CPC)

September 22nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... hard, and their fortunes are tied up in their family farm. Now the Liberals want to tax these farm families even more. Farmers like Gerald are being put in a tight spot. While crushing our food produ...”

Ms. Georgina Jolibois (Desnethé—Missinippi—Churchill River, NDP)

September 22nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, over the summer I met with families across Saskatchewan who raised concerns with how the inquiry into missing and murdered indigenous women is offloading some responsibility onto community-based organizations. With cuts to the STC, it is almost impossible for families to reach the inquiry's registration, community meetings, and hearings.

If a nation-to...”

Ms. Yvonne Jones (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs, Lib.)

September 22nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ernment has launched a truly national and independent inquiry. At the heart of that inquiry are the families that have been affected and those who have been victimized through the process. The inquiry has told us, the commissioners have told us, that they have a plan, that they are dedicated to learning and adapting as the inquiry progresses and to finding the solutions to address the families' needs.”

Ms. Yvonne Jones (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs, Lib.)

September 22nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...that this is a priority for our government. It is a priority for us that we respond to the needs of families, and we intend to do that.”

Mr. Joël Lightbound (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance, Lib.)

September 22nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...em. That is why we have come up with proposals that will not affect small farms run by middle-class families. All we are trying to do is correct certain inequities in our current tax system.”

Mr. Rodger Cuzner (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour, Lib.)

September 22nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ncreased the amount of support for Canadian students by 50% to help those in low- and middle-income families. We have helped persons with disabilities and indigenous Canadians by increasing the number...”

Mr. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, CPC)

September 22nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...B.C. Supreme Court in Vancouver was forced to close family and civil chambers for a whole day. Real families are facing issues of access, child support, spousal support, and are being hurt by the Libe...”

Mr. Jean-Claude Poissant (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food, Lib.)

September 22nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...Mr. Speaker, our government fully supports the supply management system, dairy producers and their families, and Canada's entire dairy industry.

We are the party that fought to bring in supply ...”

Hon. Jean-Yves Duclos (Minister of Families, Children and Social Development, Lib.)

September 22nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...tuents. Our plan will give Canadian children the best possible start in life and provide support to families who need it most. We have now signed agreements with Ontario, P.E.I., New Brunswick, and Nunavut. We are working very hard to achieve similar outcomes with other provincial and territorial partners. With each agreement we are getting closer to achieving our goal of affordable, high-quality, and fully-inclusive child care for all Canadian children and families.”

Ms. Yvonne Jones (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs, Lib.)

September 22nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...agrees with us that the program for northerners and the struggles they have in trying to feed their families are completely unacceptable. That is why our government has expanded the program to include...”

Mr. Richard Cannings (South Okanagan—West Kootenay, NDP)

September 21st
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... of pacifists came to southern B.C. in the form of American draft dodgers, who left their homes and families to avoid conscription into the Vietnam War.

This history has created several very act...”

Ms. Emmanuella Lambropoulos (Saint-Laurent, Lib.)

September 21st
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...urp Hagop, and the Notre-Dame-de-Nareg community have all welcomed and assisted many Syrian refugee families.[Translation]

Furthermore, not only did Montreal's Armenian community insist that the...”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

September 21st
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ans across the country want to make sure their tax system is fair, not only for them, but for their families. They want to make sure it is not a system that encourages people to do tax planning so the...”

Mr. John Brassard (Barrie—Innisfil, CPC)

September 21st
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...is not a good thing. The Liberals are going to ruin us, all of us, including my employees and their families.

Why has the Finance Minister designed a system by which Harvey will pay 73% tax whil...”

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs (Lakeland, CPC)

September 21st
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...h new rules, and it has been three years. It is Liberal chaos and Liberal delays. Workers and their families need answers. Canada needs energy east.

When will the Liberals finally champion this ...”

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Minister of Health, Lib.)

September 21st
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...im today.

All members of the House recognize the devastating impact that suicide has on their families, their friends, and their community. Last November, our government launched a federal frame...”

Mr. Robert Kitchen (Souris—Moose Mountain, CPC)

September 20th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...ave men and women who have sacrificed so much to keep this country safe. They, as well as all their families, deserve the utmost respect and honour.

I encourage everyone in the House and all Can...”

Mr. Alain Rayes (Richmond—Arthabaska, CPC)

September 20th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... the little guy's expense.”

That is the truth. The government is not going to help Joseph and families across Canada by raising taxes for SMEs.

Will the minister rethink his unfair, ad hoc...”

Mr. Matthew Dubé (Beloeil—Chambly, NDP)

September 20th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ral MPs, including ministers, wrote to the Minister of Finance to ask him to correct the situation. Families have to cancel trips because their children's names are on the list and business people are...”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

September 20th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...e sure, as we move forward to have a fairer tax system, that it really does continue to enable farm families, fishers, and people across the country to be successful. We are listening to people across...”

Hon. François-Philippe Champagne (Minister of International Trade, Lib.)

September 20th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...rage all MPs to use the free trade agreement to make a difference in the lives of small businesses, families, workers, farmers, and fishers. It will be a great day for Canada.”

Hon. Ginette Petitpas Taylor (Minister of Health, Lib.)

September 20th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... in Canada.

We will continue to work to improve the lives of those with Alzheimer's and their families.”

Mr. Luc Berthold (Mégantic—L'Érable, CPC)

September 20th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...nately did not have time to get it passed. Does he agree that it will make Canadian drivers and the families who get around in these cars safer?

Does he also agree that the government could have...”

Ms. Irene Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe, NDP)

September 20th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...line, the Terrain, to Mexico, and not a word from the government. Now, 2,800 CAMI workers and their families are striking to keep the plant open with the production of the Equinox, and still nothing f...”

Ms. Julie Dzerowicz (Davenport, Lib.)

September 20th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...are so proud of the Luso Canadian Charitable Society Centre, headed by Jack Prazeres, that supports families and adults living with developmental and physical disabilities. Of course, I have to give a shout-out to the many female Luso groups, such as the Amigas de Toronto, raising money for cancer research and support.

We cannot talk about Portuguese clubs in Canada without mentioning ACAPO. The Alliance of Portuguese Clubs and Associations of Ontario does such an extraordinary job of bringing all the clubs together, doing the most ambitious programming for Portugal Week, and organizing the second-largest street festival in Toronto. I want to acknowledge José Maria Eustáquio for his leadership, and the leadership of their board and volunteers. (1730)

The Portuguese are highly established and very integrated into the Canadian diaspora. Many of the Portuguese when they arrived in Canada took construction and cleaning jobs. These honourable jobs helped hard-working Portuguese to support their families, buy homes, and contribute to their church and community. The Portuguese also raised citize...”

Hon. Diane Finley (Haldimand—Norfolk, CPC)

September 20th
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Private Members' Business

“...and—Norfolk, challenges are abundant. In order for many people in my community to provide for their families, hard work is often a requirement. It is not easy, but if they are not afraid to get some d...”

Mr. Alexandre Boulerice (Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, NDP)

September 20th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...rst nations and Inuit people, we are all sons and daughters of more or less recent immigrants, some families having settled here earlier than others.

We often say that our diversity is our stren...”

Ms. Sonia Sidhu (Brampton South, Lib.)

September 20th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...anada to help fill labour needs. Keeping up with the post-World War II development boom, Portuguese families settled into their new homes and helped rebuild cities. From those early days to today, we ...”

Ms. Rachel Blaney (North Island—Powell River, NDP)

September 20th
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“...ng needs than seniors as a whole. Senior renters living alone are more at risk than those living in families, 51% compared to 23%. Women are disproportionately affected. More than half of all senior w...”

Mr. Kevin Lamoureux (Parliamentary Secretary to the Leader of the Government in the House of Commons, Lib.)

September 20th
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“...ister could tell Canadian seniors that housing was just not available. On behalf of the Minister of Families, Children and Social Development, I would like to suggest that is simply not true.

Th...”

Ms. Sheila Malcolmson (Nanaimo—Ladysmith, NDP)

September 20th
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“...ssertion back in the spring that this was a benefit for wealthy people riding the bus. Middle-class families and low-income individuals are the ones who are paying the price of this cancellation.

<...”

Mr. Joël Lightbound (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Health, Lib.)

September 20th
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“...ing nearly nine million Canadians. Furthermore, thanks to the Canada child benefit, nine out of ten families are getting more help today than they did under previous programs, with an average increase of nearly $2,300 in tax-free benefits per year.

Still more recently, in budget 2017, the government took steps to make these tax breaks for individuals and families even more effective and more accessible. These are just a few examples of what we can achie...”

Mr. Glen Motz (Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner, CPC)

September 19th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...the product cycles; and that manufacturers would cover the costs associated with recalls. That puts families first and works at the heart of protecting our regulatory regime.

The president of th...”

Mrs. Sherry Romanado (Longueuil—Charles-LeMoyne, Lib.)

September 19th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“... an event that recognizes the service and sacrifice of our brave men and women in uniform and their families. I had the honour of running with my family and many members of the Liberal caucus, includi...”

Mr. Ken Hardie (Fleetwood—Port Kells, Lib.)

September 19th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...ommunities Canadians deserve and delivering on our historic infrastructure investments for Canadian families and their growing communities. I thank CUTA for all the work it does and welcome it to Otta...”

Mr. Todd Doherty (Cariboo—Prince George, CPC)

September 19th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“... not be an understatement.

They have been devastating in my riding of Cariboo--Prince George. Families have lost everything, and some are simply not returning. Businesses are struggling to recov...”

Ms. Irene Mathyssen (London—Fanshawe, NDP)

September 19th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, this afternoon, veterans and their families are gathering on the Hill to demand action on mefloquine, an anti-malaria drug with potentially severe side effects.

CF members were ordered to take mefloquine as part of a botched drug trial, and the results have been tragic. Both Conservative and Liberal governments have long ignored the calls for an investigation, leaving veterans and their families suffering.

Will the minister finally do something right and initiate a study to deter...”

Mr. John Barlow (Foothills, CPC)

September 19th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...olks in gated communities who are going to be impacted by these punitive tax changes. Canadian farm families do not live in gated communities, and they will be impacted by these tax changes. Of course...”

Ms. Jenny Kwan (Vancouver East, NDP)

September 19th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...minister met with the provinces, but there has still been no action. In the meantime, the future of families like those of Mercedes Benitez hangs in the balance.

Will the minister stop discrimin...”

Mr. Serge Cormier (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship, Lib.)

September 19th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, I truly understand the concerns raised by the families grappling with this situation. We are conducting a thorough review of the policy regarding ...”

Hon. Dominic LeBlanc (Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard, Lib.)

September 19th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ass Canadians having the appropriate tax structure so they can continue to thrive and support their families.

We will always work to ensure that middle-class Canadians benefit from a tax regime ...”

Mr. Michel Picard (Montarville, Lib.)

September 19th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, residents of my riding, Montarville, especially families with young children, clearly understand the tax benefits. It is obvious that they are very ...”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

September 19th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ation. We are continuing to invest in our economy because it is very important. There are now more families with jobs and more business opportunities across the country thanks to our rate of growth.<...”

Mr. Pat Kelly (Calgary Rocky Ridge, CPC)

September 19th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...how they share income from the family business.

When did it become the minister's job to tell families which spouse should receive what benefit for the risks that a family-owned business shares?...”

Ms. Rachael Harder (Lethbridge, CPC)

September 19th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ning motor vehicle safety for Canadians act. This legislation would better protect Canadians, their families, their children, and their loved ones, as it would make sure that defects within vehicles a...”