Entrepreneur: The Last Six Months
Of Federal Activity

About

This Report

This is a computer-generated report that shows all of the federal activity with respect to the keyword "Entrepreneur" over the last six months. This is a demonstration of the power of our government relations automation software.

Hansard

House: 74 Speeches
Senate: 15 Speeches

House Senate

Bills

Active: 0

Regulations

Filed: 3
Proposed: 0

Regulations

The House

Mrs. Salma Zahid (Scarborough Centre, Lib.)

December 10th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...Could the minister please explain how this government is actually helping women and how the women's entrepreneurship strategy is working to help women overcome these challenges?”

Hon. Mary Ng (Minister of Small Business and Export Promotion, Lib.)

December 10th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... This is why we recently invested $85 million in a women ecosystem fund to help support those women entrepreneurs and another $20 million to help those women grow their businesses. By advancing women'...”

Mr. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.)

December 6th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...vernment is looking at how we can empower women and protect women in our society. We are working on entrepreneurship programs for women. We are also looking at equal pay for work of equal value.

..”

Hon. Erin O'Toole (Durham, CPC)

December 6th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, the Liberal government has raised taxes on entrepreneurs, on hiring employees through payroll taxes and it is imposing a carbon tax. Tariffs an...”

Mr. Dean Allison (Niagara West, CPC)

December 4th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“.... That was something the Conservative government looked at and worked toward.

With respect to entrepreneurship and access to capital in this country, there are a number of things we still need t...”

Mr. Francesco Sorbara (Vaughan—Woodbridge, Lib.)

December 4th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...f Parliament for the riding of Vaughan—Woodbridge, know full well the economic contributions of our entrepreneurs who are working diligently, putting capital to work and employing thousands of Canadians and, most important, creating those good middle-class jobs that we want for Canadians and their families.

Three years ago, Canadians chose a government committed to growing the middle class and creating new opportunities for Canadians to succeed. They wanted a government that would base its decision on science and facts. They wanted a government that would be bold, that would be a trailblazer, that would lead, and we are certainly doing that. They wanted solutions that worked, with a proven record of delivering positive results for Canadians.

Canadians do not want Canada to be more competitive simply to enrich the top 1% at the expense of everyone else. Canadians want a more competitive Canada so hard-working Canadians have more opportunities to share in the benefits that come from a strong and growing economy.

We asked the wealthiest 1% of Canadians to pay a little more so we could cut taxes for the middle class Canadians, a tax cut for nine million Canadians over a five-year period, a multi-billion dollar tax cut for hard-working middle-class Canadians from coast to coast to coast.

With new measures like the Canada child benefit, we have provided real help to those who need it. These results are not built on ideology; they are built on facts and the facts are clear. Over the course of the past three years, Canadians have created over half a million full-time jobs. Many of those jobs are in the city of Vaughan in the riding I represent, Vaughan—Woodbridge.

The unemployment rate is at a historic 40-year low and the share of working-age Canadians with jobs is at an all-time high. Our economy grew at the fastest pace among our G7 peers in 2017, at 3%, and we are expected to remain among the leaders in growth this year and next year. Most important, the economic growth we are seeing in Canada is inclusive and Canadians are benefiting from it. Groups that have been under-represented in the labour force, such as young Canadians, new Canadians, women and indigenous peoples, are joining the workforce and improving their position in it.

Our successes in building a more competitive economy are far from over. We know, for example, that there is tremendous untapped potential within Canada's small business sector. By empowering entrepreneurs, we are empowering Canadians. (1230) [Translation]

Seven out of ten jobs in the private sector are created by small businesses. We know that keeping taxes low and competitive allows Canadian business owners to keep more of their revenues so they can invest more in their companies and create even more well-paid jobs.

That is why we reduced the small business tax to 10% effective last January. In January 2019, the rate will be reduced even further to 9%.

However, there is still work to be done. Even though Canada's economy is strong and growing, we know that we cannot take that for granted. The Government of Canada listened to the business community. We understood that many businesses are concerned about their competitiveness, the recent tax reform in the U.S., and the impact that current international trade disputes could have on their bottom line.

We also know that Canadian businesses have what it takes to compete and succeed. In our fall economic statement, we looked for ways to encourage this investment in a responsible and targeted way so that businesses can have confidence in the future and be better able to invest in jobs for the middle class.[English]

We continue to grow and strengthen our middle class here in Canada, the backbone of our economy.[Translation]

Our fall economic statement proposed a number of tax changes designed to support business investment. These changes include allowing businesses to immediately write off the full cost of machinery and equipment used in manufacturing and processing as well as the full cost of specific clean-energy equipment.

We are also introducing the accelerated investment incentive to allow businesses of all sizes and across all sectors to write off a larger share of the cost of newly acquired assets in the year they are purchased.

These are important changes because increased deductions will attract more investment in assets that will stimulate business growth and make more jobs available for middle-class Canadians.[English]

An accelerated capital cost allowance will grow our economy, incentivize firms to invest here in Canada and continue to invest here in Canada, and is something we can be proud of as a prudent fiscal measure in response to the measures that were brought in by the United States. We are doing it in a fiscally prudent manner. We are lowering our debt-to-GDP ratio. We are strengthening our fiscal anchor. We are growing our economy. We are strengthening our middle class, something we should all be proud of in this country.[Translation]

The fall economic statement also proposes measures to do more to modernize regulations so as to make it easier for businesses to grow.

Perhaps my colleagues have heard people say that one of the biggest challenges for businesses is complying with all the necessary regulations imposed by the government. Members who have owned businesses might have first-hand experience with this. Let me be very clear: regulations play an important role.[English]

We need to understand that regulations play an important role in attracting investment. Our regulations need to be transparent. They need to be effective. There needs to be a certainty. With bills like Bill C-69, that is what we are doing. We are putting regulations in bills for investors to know and understand the rules that they face so that they can invest here in Canada and continue to grow our economy. (1235) [Translation]

Regulations serve as a book of rules governing how businesses must carry out their activities, and they play a crucial role in protecting the health and safety of Canadians and protecting our natural environment. Over time, however, regulations can become outdated, and regulatory burdens can accumulate, making Canada a less attractive place to invest and do business.

In our fall economic statement, we are taking action to overcome that challenge, for example, by planning a review of the legislative provisions so as to encourage regulators to take into account efficiency and economic considerations. To that end, we are introducing an annual modernization bill to keep regulations up to date, striking an external advisory committee to look at Canada's regulatory competitiveness, creating a centre for regulatory innovation and taking immediate action in response to a number of business recommendations.[English]

We are also taking steps to help make Canada the most globally connected economy in the world. With the successful conclusion of the new North American Free Trade Agreement, as well as the Canada-European Union Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement, CETA, and the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership, CPTPP. We are continuing our ongoing negotiations with Mercosur, and let us hope we can come to a trade agreement there. We know that progressive liberalized trade lifts all boats, strengthens our middle class, creates jobs here in Canada, creates jobs abroad, and is something good that we need to do for our future, the future of my children, and those great manufacturers and entrepreneurs located in the riding of Vaughan—Woodbridge.

Canada is now the only G7 country t...”

Mr. Alain Rayes (Richmond—Arthabaska, CPC)

December 4th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...s clear from the indicator of foreign investment in Canada. (1345)

It is also clear that our entrepreneurs, our men and women who invest their money to create jobs, are headed for difficult tim...”

Hon. Erin O'Toole (Durham, CPC)

December 4th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“... people. We had small-business private-company tax changes.

The Liberals have raised taxes on entrepreneurs. They have raised taxes on hiring people through the payroll. They are bringing in a c...”

Hon. Erin O'Toole

December 4th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“... confidence is diminished under the government. In fact, the government has actually worked against entrepreneurs with the changes to closely held private corporations, with its treatment of dividends...”

Mr. Bernard Généreux

December 4th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“Madam Speaker, I thank my colleague for his excellent question.

I am an entrepreneur myself, and I have 22 or 23 employees right now. We have to fight every day, not only a...”

Mr. Sean Casey (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard, Lib.)

December 3rd
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...nge will accelerate innovation in our country by providing over $12 million to Canadian innovators, entrepreneurs and businesses to tackle plastic challenges in seven key areas: separation of mixed pl...”

Mr. Dan Ruimy (Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge, Lib.)

November 29th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“..., including groups that have traditionally been less likely to use IP, such as women and indigenous entrepreneurs. The results of the survey will help better meet the needs of these groups.

We w...”

Hon. Denis Paradis (Brome—Missisquoi, Lib.)

November 29th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...y in Bromont.

Bromont is fortunate to have a high-tech park that is attracting innovation and entrepreneurs. Businesses like Boréas Technologies, IBM, General Electric, Fabritec and CGP Expal ar...”

Mr. Francesco Sorbara (Vaughan—Woodbridge, Lib.)

November 26th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...of them in the private sector. I say “we” very humbly because it is risk-takers across the country, entrepreneurs, small business owners like the ones in my riding of Vaughan—Woodbridge, very successful people who invest their time and resources, who take risks and yes, hire and employ folks.

What has happened is the labour force participation rates have risen for all groups, including women and under-represented groups. That is what we need to succeed. That is what we are seeing. Bill C-86 contains those types of measures: pay equity legislation which is groundbreaking; a ministry for women; child-rearing drop-in positions; a new parental sharing benefit. It is said that the sincerest form of flattery is imitation, and those provisions are similar to the ones that are used in the province of Quebec. When two parents can share benefits, they get an extra couple of weeks. In Quebec, the labour force participation rate for women is much higher than in other parts of the country. With this, we will improve that. We have learned a measure from la belle province.

On the poverty reduction targets, I cannot emphasize this more than to say that we will be going from one in eight in poverty, about 12% of the population today, to about one in 10 in 2020, which is 10% and we have targeted one in 17, which is roughly 6%. Currently, we have lifted 650,000 Canadians out of poverty by the measures we have introduced in the last three years. That is something worth recognizing, but we need to recognize there is more work to be done.

I often like to say that we have done a lot for our economy. There are a lot of good things. We have created 550,000 jobs. We have attracted a lot of investment. LNG was approved in my home province of British Columbia. I say it is my home province because that is where I was born and raised. However, our work is not done until all Canadians can succeed, have a good job with benefits, good pay and provide for a brighter future for themselves, and most importantly, their families as many of us do here. That is what is important. That is the material in Bill C-86. It was those measures that I had the pleasure of debating at committee.

We have also done some other things that Canadians will benefit from. We have improved their protection when they visit a bank or financial institution. We have introduced measures to make sure that all organizations, all high net worth individuals, pay their fair share of taxes. We continue to do that. We have invested $1 billion into the CRA in the last two or three years to ensure that it has the resources and tools to go after those who are not paying their fair share.

In my riding of Vaughan—Woodbridge, I am blessed to have a number of entrepreneurs. They are going to benefit in January 2019. We have moved our small business tax rate ...”

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi (Don Valley East, Lib.)

November 26th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ugh the federal development business innovation initiative, our government has provided mentorship, entrepreneurship, support and financing to help new businesses grow and succeed. In November last ye...”

Mr. Francis Scarpaleggia (Lac-Saint-Louis, Lib.)

November 26th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... continue in infrastructure. Of course, we recognize that closing the gender gap, especially in the entrepreneurial area, is not only right and good social policy, but it is a good way to increase the...”

Ms. Yasmin Ratansi

November 26th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...illion going to real things.

I appreciate the fact that we have been doing so much, but women entrepreneurship is critical. The majority of small and medium-sized enterprises are owned by women. Our government has worked hard to ensure there is a woman entrepreneurship fund to help them move along.”

Hon. Larry Bagnell (Yukon, Lib.)

November 26th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ssing, Dawson, Watson Lake and Carmacks.

Also very exciting is the $1 million for the women's entrepreneurship program. I congratulate the women's business network and Tammy Beese. There is anot...”

Hon. Larry Bagnell

November 26th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... child care, veterans, people being helped with mental health and addictions, people in the women's entrepreneurship program, people in the innovation centre and people with the economic development a...”

Mr. John Barlow (Foothills, CPC)

November 22nd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...a are created by our small and medium-sized enterprises, SMEs. They are successful because they are entrepreneurs, willing to take the risks. We have to ensure that they have the tools to take those r...”

Ms. Karen Ludwig (New Brunswick Southwest, Lib.)

November 22nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, in New Brunswick Southwest, there are incredible entrepreneurs with innovative ideas who want to start up and scale up their companies, but often, du...”

Hon. Mary Ng (Minister of Small Business and Export Promotion, Lib.)

November 22nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...l available to Canadian clean-tech companies. These investments will help support Canadian SMEs and entrepreneurs to scale up and create great new Canadian jobs.”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

November 21st
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...class. We have helped children, we have helped families, we have helped seniors, we have helped our entrepreneurs, and we have cut small business taxes. Our investments in the middle class are working...”

Hon. Bill Morneau (Minister of Finance, Lib.)

November 21st
Hansard Link

Routine Proceedings

“...rs on all sides of the House, mayors from some of Canada's biggest cities and smallest towns, local entrepreneurs and artists from all across our great country, on behalf of the Prime Minister and my ...”

Ms. Tracey Ramsey (Essex, NDP)

November 7th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...t only relegating to one small chapter.

Gender equality does not only concern issues of women entrepreneurs and business owners. Labour rights must also address injustices to women, like pay ine...”

Mr. Kelly McCauley (Edmonton West, CPC)

November 7th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...the most innovative nation in the entire world. It ranks first in the world for its attitude toward entrepreneurial risk and for the growth of innovative companies, and it is second, only after the U....”

Mr. Francesco Sorbara (Vaughan—Woodbridge, Lib.)

November 1st
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...wing that our government made the right decisions for their future.

I also wish to salute the entrepreneurs in the city of Vaughan, who run over 12,000 small and medium enterprises. They know th...”

Mr. Larry Maguire (Brandon—Souris, CPC)

November 1st
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“... education from BU and have gone onto become world-class researchers, teachers, musicians, doctors, entrepreneurs, athletes, lawyers, politicians and much more. Henry Champ, Andy Murray, Walter Dinsda...”

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes (Whitby, Lib.)

November 1st
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...hese initiatives in the second BIA.

The objective of Canada's IP strategy is to help Canadian entrepreneurs better understand and protect intellectual property in order to strategically access and grow to scale. Business leaders from my riding of Whitby understand the importance of a strategy.

Jason Atkins, the CEO of 360insights, a great company in Whitby, has said that “IP is a critical component for businesses to scale, especially to a global level. If we want to create well-paid jobs in our country, we need to look at businesses with a global lens and leverage IP to compete globally.”

Also, Isaac Wanzama, founder and strategic senior strategist at geekspeak Commerce in Whitby, has said that “Intellectual property is the lifeblood of any innovation ecosystem, that is certainly true in Canada. As entrepreneurs, if we aren’t protecting the investments that we are make in our tech research, whether AI or genetics, then we’re not only doing a disservice to our businesses but to the Canadian economy as a whole. But, it’s not always that we don’t want to, often it’s because the process is difficult to understand and even if you can understand it, very expensive. Canada’s new IP Strategy, which aims to educate, simplify and reduce associated costs for startups and innovative businesses is a welcomed announcement.”

Innovative businesses in my riding are clearly excited about our government's plan. The IP strategy sets out to help businesses get the information and confidence they need to grow their businesses and take risks. It will help spur Canadian innovation and boost Canadian presence in the global marketplace through three key areas. It will increase IP literacy through IP awareness and educational programs, offer strategic IP tools for growth, and implement legislative amendments to strengthen Canada's IP system.

Today, I want to focus my remarks on the specific initiatives that will help improve IP awareness and education among Canadian businesses and innovators.

Along with a strong and effective IP framework in place, Canadian businesses must also, first and foremost, recognize and understand the importance of IP use in order to succeed in a global marketplace. They need to be able to understand how to protect their IP and use it effectively.

The statistics on Canadian businesses' IP awareness and use, particularly small and medium-sized businesses, are of concern. We know that small and medium-sized companies with IP in Canada are 64% more likely to be high growth companies and four times more likely to export, yet only 10% even hold some form of formal IP. Further, 83% of Canadian small and medium-sized businesses have indicated that IP was not relevant to their business when citing the reasons for not seeking IP rights. This is why, along with the other legislative changes we are bringing forward, we are also expanding our efforts in IP literacy.

The IP strategy is built on the Canadian Intellectual Property Office's IP awareness and education efforts that are already in place across the innovation ecosystem to ensure that innovators, entrepreneurs, businesses and creators recognize the value of IP.

The Canadian Intellectual Property Office, CIPO, will continue to build on current learning tools and resources, and also develop new educational resources to better equip innovators and businesses with the knowledge they need to succeed. (1610)

The CIPO has a team of IP advisers located across Canada who work directly with companies and innovators to deliver seminars and participate in innovation and business-related events, such as StartupCanada's Canadian export challenge.

Over the last year, the CIPO has delivered 150 seminars across the country, reaching over 1,900 participants through its IP awareness and education program.

The CIPO will be increasing the number of its initiatives over the next year, which will include hosting up to 60 seminars on advanced topics, such as IP commercialization and strategy and enforcement, and is increasing accessibility to these sessions by offering webcasts and developing e-learning modules.

Our government will also conduct a survey to better understand how Canadians understand and use IP, including groups that have been traditionally less likely to use IP, such as indigenous entrepreneurs and women. The results of the survey will help us meet the needs of under-represented ...”

Ms. Kim Rudd (Northumberland—Peterborough South, Lib.)

November 1st
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“Mr. Speaker, I very much enjoyed listening to my colleague's wonderful comments. As an entrepreneur and someone who knows about risk when going into business, it is heartwarming to hear t...”

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes

November 1st
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... to scale up, it becomes very risky and very scary for them. Before getting into politics, I was an entrepreneur, so I share the concerns of my colleague on this.

The IP strategy we announced on...”

Mr. Darrell Samson (Sackville—Preston—Chezzetcook, Lib.)

November 1st
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... means for our veterans, and women's potential economic benefit when they are much more involved in entrepreneurship and building strong companies.

I cannot go into the text before talking about how our economy is doing now.

After three years, we have seen the Canadian economy grow and continue to prosper. Over 600,000 new jobs have been created. It is a strong sign of our government moving in the right direction when people want to invest and when we are creating good jobs for the middle class.

As well, we should note that the unemployment rate in Canada has dropped from 7.2% to 5.7%. Yes, members heard me correctly. At 5.7%, it is the lowest unemployment rate in Canada in the last 40 years. It is very impressive.

I also want to talk about the Canada child benefit. This is an investment in Canadians and in Canadian families. It is an investment in young families, which is extremely important. The riding of Sackville—Preston—Chezzetcook is one riding out of 338 in Canada, and in my riding alone the families are receiving $5.2 million per month. That is $60 million per year in the riding of Sackville—Preston—Chezzetcook.

I am not the only lucky one, because all 338 members of Parliament have this Canada child benefit going to their constituents, which means anywhere between $40 million and $80 million invested in families in their ridings.

Speaking about families in this budget implementation bill, I want to talk about the EI parental benefit. That is a very important benefit that recognizes some of the challenges in life. It is creating more flexibility for Canadian families. If they split or share those benefits, we are adding five extra weeks of benefits.

As well, when talking about families, we have to talk about pharmacare. Our government is moving forward. We have established an advisory committee that will report shortly. We also had the permanent committee present its report on pharmacare. I believe we will see some positive news on pharmacare very soon.

We are also introducing, of course, the new Canada workers benefit. This new benefit will add 300,000 Canadians to the middle class. That means over two million Canadians will now have access to this benefit, which is very important. With BIA 2, we will ensure that these individuals do not have to apply; it will happen automatically, once again making life easier for Canadian families. (1620)

I also want to talk about some changes in the labour code that will provide five days of paid leave to victims of family violence employed by the public service, as well as five days of personal leave, three of which would be paid. Those are major changes that will make life better for Canadians.

Touching on veterans, this is a very important topic for me. My riding has the largest number of veterans and military per capita, with 23% being veterans. We have introduced the option of a pension for life. Veterans already have a lump-sum pension, which we had introduced, but now they will have the option of a pension for life.

Depending on their pain and suffering, veterans could have up to $1,150 a month. If they have additional pain and suffering, they could receive another $1,500 a month, or a salary replacement of up to 90%. That is what our government is doing to support our veterans and their families. I hear when I am travelling around my riding how important it is for veterans to have access to that.

I have to talk about the ID card for veterans and a story, believe it or not, that I still have trouble with. When veterans tell me this story, it is painful to hear: The former Harper government cut the ID card for veterans. If anyone can help me understand that, please do so, because that is amazing.

Our government has just introduced a new ID card. The new ID card will have a veteran's photo and rank on it, as well as his or her service record and service number. It will not only recognize veterans' service, their hard work and what they have done for Canadians, but it will also help them access programs and services, which is extremely important.

Talking now about women, we have invested in a new entrepreneurial strategy for supporting women in industry. We have invested $1.65 billion over three...”

Ms. Joyce Murray (Parliamentary Secretary to the President of the Treasury Board and Minister of Digital Government, Lib.)

October 29th
Hansard Link

Private Members’ Business

“...up-cycling the plastic material. There are ample opportunities now for innovation in this area, for entrepreneurship and the utilization of science and research to help us solve this problem on a much...”

Hon. Jim Carr (Minister of International Trade Diversification, Lib.)

October 29th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...is. FTAs are the bridges, but to truly realize the opportunity we have created, we need people, the entrepreneurs and first-time exporters, to cross those bridges. Our diversity is our economic strength.

Canada and Israel have long been connected through the power of people-to-people ties, a shared commitment to democracy and a friendship that started 70 years ago when Israel became a nation. It continues to grow with each passing year.

Israel is the home of the Jewish people and if we needed reminding why this is so important, why affirming and reaffirming our bonds is so important, we horrifically saw why when on Saturday, 11 worshippers were killed in Pittsburgh only because they were Jewish.

Jewish people have been in Canada since 1759 and now our community of more than 350,000 continues to contribute impressively to our national mosaic. My grandparents came to Canada in 1906, escaping the pogroms of the tsar. They were persecuted only because they were Jewish. That is yet another reason to underline the importance of security to the State of Israel.

I have visited Israel many times and made my first trip as Canada's Minister of International Trade Diversification in August. Canada and Israel have forged a partnership that continues to deepen with each passing year. Strengthening those bonds depends on constant renewal, which is why our government recently modernized the Canada-Israel Free Trade Agreement. The agreement creates opportunities for Canadians and Israelis to partner in the growing fields of science, technology and innovation across our vibrant markets. The agreement has the potential for more people to work together, creating well-paying jobs for hard-working Canadians as a result.

Bill C-85 before the House today stands as testimony to Canada's and Israel's shared commitment to maintain openness, celebrate our friendship and expand our links so that more of our people and more of our businesses can benefit from them. (1710)

I am especially pleased that this modernized trade agreement strengthens our commercial ties, generating more business for both our countries. When Israeli Minister of Economy and Industry Eli Cohen travelled to Canada this year to sign our modernized Canada-Israel Free Trade Agreement, we built on that partnership. We committed to a forward-looking framework for trade that expanded meaningful access to each other's markets and introduced chapters on gender, labour, environmental protection, and support for small and medium-sized enterprises. Minister Cohen said at that time, “We are witnessing a historical step in the trade relations between the two countries with the signing of the upgraded agreement.”

In some respects Minister Cohen was even a little understated. We expanded market access for more Canadians and Israelis, but we also pushed the envelope by writing new international law, putting an end to inequality of access to job-creating trade and investment. The new chapters on gender, the environment and labour are explicitly about growing our trading relationship while expanding access for those who did not necessarily see themselves or their values reflected in the agreements of the past.

There is enormous untapped economic potential, but for too long we have focused on the few and not on the many. We are changing that. We are encouraging more of these would-be exporters to get in the game, and these chapters are about showing workers and their families that trade can work for them. Israel is clearly thinking longer term to future-proof its own economy, taking full advantage of its entrepreneurial spirit to develop a high-tech industry and to promote clean technologies.

Israelis have every right to tout the initiatives launched by the Israel Innovation Authority to drive public sector innovation. We see room to expand Canadian-Israeli business partnerships, innovating our way into greater prosperity.

Since the original CIFTA came into force in 1997, merchandising trade between Canada and Israel has more than tripled, reaching $1.7 billion in 2017. This demonstrates the importance of trade agreements to bilateral trade.

The modernized CIFTA will open new doors and make Canadian goods more competitive in the Israeli market. For example, in this new agreement, we have expanded market access for goods by eliminating tariffs on nearly all products traded between Canada and Israel, nearly all products. This will make Canadian agri-food, agriculture, fish and seafood products more competitive in the Israeli market, benefiting a range of companies in all those sectors.

We have also negotiated rules that are designed to address non-tariff barriers, facilitate trade, make it more predictable, and reduce red tape, including some of the costs to companies for doing business. The modernized CIFTA also adopts a new framework that includes chapters on trade and gender, small and medium enterprises, labour and the environment, as well as a new provision on corporate social responsibility.

The modernized agreement reflects who we are as vibrant, diverse, open and democratic societies. This agreement is not only for today but for future generations.

The new chapters on trade and gender and on small and medium enterprises ensure that the benefits and opportunities that flow from trade and investment are more widely shared. Both chapters provide frameworks for Canada and Israel to work together to encourage women and small and medium enterprises to take full advantage of this agreement.

The new chapter on environment includes robust commitments so that parties maintain high levels of environmental protection, while liberalizing trade. This is in line with other Canadian FTAs, including more environmental governance. This is the first environmental chapter that Israel has ever agreed to in a free trade agreement.

Canada and Israel also agreed to a chapter on labour that includes comprehensive and enforceable obligations to protect and promote internationally recognized labour principles and rights. The labour chapter recognizes that economic development is not achieved at the expense of workers' rights, backed by an enforceable dispute settlement mechanism.

A modernized CIFTA shows the world that we put our people first and are committed to embracing that value as an economic strength. (1715)

One in six Canadian jobs are directly linked to exports, and that is one of the reasons we are so committed to expanding the pie for all Canadians. The more bridges we build, the more opportunities there are for people to cross those bridges with goods, services and investments.

For those here today who may not know, Israel has a long-standing reputation for technological prowess, with a well-developed scientific and educational base. We see room to expand and build partnerships in these sectors and many others. There are exciting opportunities for Canadian companies in sectors such as aerospace, smart mobility, sustainable technologies, information and communications technology, life sciences and energy.

There are also great prospects for joint research and development. For example, Canadian and Israeli firms have joined forces to develop an ultraviolet water monitoring system that ensures the safety of drinking water. There are even more possibilities on the horizon that will change countless lives in communities across the globe. When I was in Tel Aviv in September, I announced a pilot program to facilitate new cybersecurity solutions for the energy sector, matching expertise in areas like anti-hacking with the needs of Canada's natural gas delivery companies.

With so much potential and opportunity on both sides, it simply makes sense that we work together and knit our economies even tighter. Not surprisingly, the government's consultations, in the context of the negotiations, have consistently revealed support for a modernized Canada-Israel Free Trade Agreement. Canadians want to do more business in and with Israel in the years ahead. A modernized free trade agreement between our countries is a surefire way to make that happen. Our competitiveness depends on small and medium-sized enterprises pursuing trade opportunities and for us to support them in doing so.

The Prime Minister has prioritized, in my mandate as minister of international trade and diversification, support for Canadian businesses to take advantage of the opportunities that flow after trade agreements are signed, including by drawing on resources from across government and from public and private sector partners.

In order for the benefits of FTAs to be fully realized, Canadian businesses need to be aware of the agreements and the benefits they offer. Once ratified, I will work hard to promote awareness of the modernized agreement so would-be exporters have the information they need to get into the market.

My department has mobilized a free trade agreement promotion task force that is undertaking a comprehensive outreach and training program for the business community. Efforts of the task force are currently focused on flagship agreements, like Canada's trade agreement with the European Union, or CETA, and the CPTPP, which last week received royal assent and was subsequently ratified. I want to pause here and thank all members of the House who co-operated so fully to ensure that Canada was among the first tranche to ratify, which gives us a first advantage that will be meaningful for our entrepreneurs and our exporters, and ultimately will create jobs for Canadians.

Once CIFTA is ...”

Hon. Jim Carr

October 29th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...om the United States.

As a competitive advantage, I thought that was quite an insight from an entrepreneur, a woman CEO, who makes decisions all the time about where to invest capital. She wante...”

Hon. Steven Blaney (Bellechasse—Les Etchemins—Lévis, CPC)

October 25th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...ry.

One way in which this community is contributing to our country is through the outstanding entrepreneurial spirit of the Filipino members. Canadians of Filipino origin have founded several bu...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

October 25th
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“...ted to 21st-century realities. It puts people first and creates opportunities for small businesses, entrepreneurs and the middle class in Canada and the European Union. Since CETA's entry into force, ...”

Hon. Andrew Leslie (Orléans, Lib.)

October 19th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...y awarded with Renovator of the Year.[Translation]

Again, I want to acknowledge and thank the entrepreneurs in our community for the important role that they play. I am proud to celebrate Small ...”

Mr. Tom Kmiec (Calgary Shepard, CPC)

October 18th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...the achievement of a great young Calgarian, Matthew Dirk, who has been honoured with the integrated entrepreneur of the year award by the e-commerce giant eBay. How did he do it? With his trademark hard work and typical can-do Alberta attitude, and an extraordinary ability to find an opportunity in every problem. He took a traditional business-to-business industry and tapped into a growing consumer e-commerce market. He took a regular traditional business selling gold and silver and upped its sales by 400%. Today, SilverGoldBull is on track to make $8 million by the end of the year. Did I mention he is only 23 years old?

Entrepreneurs like Matt are Canada's pride and joy. We need more of them. We need the Matthews of Canada to succeed, because they are the lifeblood of our communities.

I invite all members to join me in congratulating Matthew on his impressive business award and for being an inspiration to other young entrepreneurs who are making a mark in our communities across Canada.”

Mr. Alupa Clarke (Beauport—Limoilou, CPC)

October 18th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, the minister of labour seems to have no idea how much she upset entrepreneurs, elected officials in Quebec City and Canadians when she made a mockery of my question...”

Ms. Jennifer O'Connell (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance (Youth Economic Opportunity), Lib.)

October 18th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... it is just the contrary. It is our government that is actually delivering for small businesses and entrepreneurs across the country. We have actually lowered the small business tax rate from 11% goin...”

Mr. Terry Duguid (Parliamentary Secretary for Status of Women, Lib.)

October 18th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...cated $7.5 billion for child care; created a new parental sharing benefit; and are supporting women entrepreneurs and women in the trades. Investing in gender equality is not only the right thing to d...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

October 17th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... does in supporting small businesses in his riding. Permit me to wish a good Small Business Week to entrepreneurs across the country.

In the tourism sector, small businesses already provide 1.8 ...”

Ms. Jenny Kwan

October 17th
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“... shareholders keep getting their dividend cheques. It is investing in Canadian workers and Canadian entrepreneurs to develop, implement and obtain careers in green energy initiatives that will allow u...”

Mr. Francesco Sorbara (Vaughan—Woodbridge, Lib.)

October 15th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...cations. It would also ensure that transfer pricing is done fairly.

My riding is blessed with entrepreneurs of all different stripes. The city of Vaughan has over 11,000 SMEs. We have some of the most successful entrepreneurs in the country. I applaud their efforts. I meet with them regularly. I like to listen ...”

Mr. Tom Kmiec (Calgary Shepard, CPC)

October 15th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...Is this the way the member imagines the CRA should be behaving with our small businesses, small entrepreneurs and single moms who are just trying to make ends meet? With the rising cost of living,...”

Mr. Tom Kmiec (Calgary Shepard, CPC)

October 15th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...about it.

However, where are we talking about the wealth creation to get small businesses and entrepreneurs to start creating more jobs, to want to invest? We had the aborted attempt by the Mini...”

Mr. Tom Kmiec

October 15th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... dollars to hire more staff to hassle moms who need support or information from the CRA, as well as entrepreneurs and people who are just trying to find out what information the CRA needs so that they...”

Ms. Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.)

October 15th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...he backbone of our economy and the strength of our communities. I am proud to come from a family of entrepreneurs and to have experienced what it is like to be an entrepreneur and to work very hard for customers, partners and employees. I am also very proud to have been president of a business association whose members were mostly small businesses.

Small businesses provide the goods and services we all need, and they create millions of jobs across the country. Few people work harder than small business owners. They deserve a government that also works for them. Our government has done a lot to help small businesses succeed. We recently lowered the small business tax rate to 10% and will lower it again next year to 9%.

I congratulate entrepreneurs and wish everyone a happy Small Business Week.”

Mr. Omar Alghabra (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Trade Diversification, Lib.)

October 5th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...le disputes that would guarantee them market access.

Mississauga is blessed with a culture of entrepreneurship. There are many entrepreneurs and innovators starting new businesses in technology and the financial industry sector. All those industries and entrepreneurs would also benefit.

The third dimension I want to talk about is people-to-people...”

Mr. Sven Spengemann (Mississauga—Lakeshore, Lib.)

October 5th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...: The Canadian economy does well when we invest in Canadians. The Conservatives failed to invest in entrepreneurship and innovation. We made those investments. They failed to invest in science and tec...”

Mr. Joe Peschisolido (Steveston—Richmond East, Lib.)

October 5th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...d store, Function Junction junk store, Cannery Cafe and Steveston Water Taxi.

Ray came by his entrepreneurial spirit naturally. His grandfather opened the town's first barber shop back in 1945 a...”

Mr. Peter Schiefke (Vaudreuil—Soulanges, Lib.)

October 5th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“Mr. Speaker, small business owners are the innovators and entrepreneurs of our communities. In Vaudreuil—Soulanges, there are small innovative companies such as Cubix in Vaudreuil-Dorion, which organizes events of all sizes, Au Croissant 21 in Rigaud, which hires employees with various disabilities, and the Jorica family farm in Rigaud, which has invested in innovative dairy farming solutions.[English]

We also have entrepreneurs who recently launched small businesses, like Jessika Ménard at le Cozy Café in Hudson ...”

Mr. Kyle Peterson (Newmarket—Aurora, Lib.)

October 5th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“.... Speaker, in my riding of Newmarket—Aurora, like all of us, there are a number of successful women entrepreneurs. However, we know that women entrepreneurs face unique barriers and challenges. Fewer than 16% of SMEs are majority women-owned in Canada. Only 8.4% of women-owned businesses export, compared to almost 13% of men-owned. Women who own businesses have a much more difficult time accessing capital.

Could the Minister of Small Business and Export Promotion update the House on what she is doing to help support women entrepreneurs and to build a more inclusive and strong economy?”

Hon. Mary Ng (Minister of Small Business and Export Promotion, Lib.)

October 5th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...the economy is essential to Canada's competitiveness. That is why, last week, I announced the women entrepreneurship ecosystem fund. It is an up to $85-million fund that will strengthen and help women entrepreneurs succeed. This program will close gaps. It will make it easier for people to find the mentorship they need. It will help organizations better respond to the needs of women entrepreneurs and will produce the kinds of initiatives they have been asking for.

According t...”

Mr. Alupa Clarke (Beauport—Limoilou, CPC)

October 4th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...auport's network of business people. These business luncheons are attended by more than 60 Beauport entrepreneurs every two or three weeks. The next one is scheduled on Wednesday, October 10, at 7 a.m...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

October 3rd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, small and medium-sized businesses, entrepreneurs and workers across Quebec and the rest of Canada are glad we have signed this agreemen...”

Mrs. Cheryl Gallant (Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke, CPC)

October 3rd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...est minister of international trade in decades, the hon. member for Abbotsford. Canada's consumers, entrepreneurs, farmers, miners and manufacturers will benefit under this agreement, thanks to the ha...”

Mr. Bob Saroya (Markham—Unionville, CPC)

October 1st
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...economic and social framework of Canada. It is a thriving community with a strong work ethic and an entrepreneurial spirit.

Since 1992, Filipinos have consistently ranked first as independent im...”

Hon. MaryAnn Mihychuk (Kildonan—St. Paul, Lib.)

October 1st
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...e a thriving community of professionals, health care workers, administrative workers, tradespeople, entrepreneurs and politicians, and are well integrated throughout Canadian society.

We see man...”

Ms. Jennifer O'Connell (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Finance (Youth Economic Opportunity), Lib.)

September 28th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...rmly focused on investing in small businesses and ensuring that we create a competitive economy for entrepreneurs to grow their businesses. We have lowered small business taxes and taxes on the middle...”

Ms. Pam Damoff (Oakville North—Burlington, Lib.)

September 28th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...n jobs and fills labour market needs. In my riding of Oakville North—Burlington, we see workers and entrepreneurs like Ancilla Ho-Young who have immigrated to our country and are making positive contr...”

Mr. Gord Johns (Courtenay—Alberni, NDP)

September 28th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...erce, and as the critic for the NDP on small business and tourism, I have had a chance to work with entrepreneurs, as well as be one. Entrepreneurs are often struggling just to make ends meet, just to make payroll or pay their supplie...”

Hon. Pierre Poilievre (Carleton, CPC)

September 28th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...on that in the 2017 tax year there will be probably be a one-time windfall of revenues from certain entrepreneurs and other Canadians as a result of reactions to government policies.

For example...”

Mr. Alain Rayes (Richmond—Arthabaska, CPC)

September 26th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...le province, passionate Canadians, proud members of first nations, local artisans, forward-thinking entrepreneurs, really passionate people from all over the province.

These precious moments tha...”

Hon. Maryam Monsef (Minister of Status of Women, Lib.)

September 24th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...e when we do so, we will add $150 billion to Canada's economy over the next eight years. When women entrepreneurs succeed, they create jobs for our sons and daughters. When we support those entering S...”

Mr. Serge Cormier (Acadie—Bathurst, Lib.)

September 21st
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...ncouver, Ms. Albert LeBlanc was awarded the national prize in the retail category for excellence in entrepreneurship in the francophone community outside Quebec. She started her company, Singer LeBlanc Aspirateurs, over 45 years ago with her now late husband Armand. Her company sells, installs and repairs sewing machines, canister tank vacuums and central vacuums. She says that her secret to success is always treating clients the way she would want to be treated. Her children, Gino, Sonia and Mélodie, who are business owners themselves, accompanied her to Vancouver to accept her award.

We are all very proud of Raymonde, in her role as businesswoman, and of her family. We congratulate her on this well-deserved award and commend her for her extraordinary work in the community and for women entrepreneurs.”

Mr. Randy Boissonnault (Edmonton Centre, Lib.)

September 21st
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“... am very proud of my home province and my city of Edmonton. It is a place that values hard work and entrepreneurship. In fact, if people come to my riding of Edmonton Centre, they will see on one of t...”

Ms. Ruby Sahota (Brampton North, Lib.)

September 19th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...ulations in the world, and the Sikh community has become known for their compassion, work ethic and entrepreneurship.

The month of April holds particular significance to Sikhs, as it is the time...”

Mr. Raj Grewal (Brampton East, Lib.)

September 19th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...ng in the lumber mills in British Columbia. Today, Sikhs are doctors, engineers, teachers, lawyers, entrepreneurs, media personalities and even politicians. They have successfully established themselv...”

Ms. Pam Goldsmith-Jones (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs (Consular Affairs), Lib.)

September 18th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ckbone of our economy and an engine of economic growth.

These provisions will ensure that our entrepreneurs and small businesses have access to information tailored to their needs, making it easy for Canadian companies to explore and navigate their way around CPTPP markets and prepare for their successful business ventures.

Through the efforts of the committee, as well as collaborative mechanisms, CPTPP signatories will be able to share best practices on how to support their businesses and to co-operate through seminars, workshops, and other capacity-building activities aimed at helping their businesses seize the opportunities created by the agreement.

The CPTPP will increase market opportunities for Canadian companies of all sizes and in all sectors and regions of the country. In the coming months, we will reach out to small and medium-sized enterprises across the country to ensure they have the knowledge and tools they need to take advantage of this historic agreement. At the same time, we will work to help Canadian SMEs to grow, expand their activities, increase their productivity and be innovative and export oriented so they can prosper and create good jobs for the middle class. (1210)

Asia is important to Canada and to our small and medium-sized enterprises. Indeed, that region's contribution to the global economy continues to grow and Asia's importance as a destination for Canadian exports has more than doubled.

The CPTPP is a cornerstone of our government's commitment to trade diversification. It will enable Canadian businesses to trade and invest in this dynamic and rapidly-growing region. Since Asia is a highly integrated and adaptable region, the benefits of CPTPP go well beyond access to new markets. This agreement will provide Canadian companies of all sizes with opportunities to enter into various regionally integrated value chains that are global in scope.

Ambitious agreements with high standards, such as the CPTPP, will help to strengthen the rules-based international system and its solid institutions, promoting global value chains and ensuring a level playing field that maximizes the benefits of trade for everyone.

By responsibly expanding our economic ties with our Asian partners, we are delivering on our promise to create economic growth opportunities that will benefit Canada's middle class. This agreement will create opportunities for Canadian entrepreneurs and small and medium-sized enterprises to expand their activities, prosper and create ...”

Ms. Linda Lapointe (Rivière-des-Mille-Îles, Lib.)

September 18th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...the spinoffs that this agreement will have in her riding, particularly for SMEs, but also for women entrepreneurs. That is a very important aspect.”

Ms. Pam Goldsmith-Jones

September 18th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“Mr. Speaker, the opportunity for women entrepreneurs is a key aspect of the CPTPP. While I had the honour of serving as the parliamentary secretary to the minister of international trade, I spent quite a bit of time in countries like Malaysia, Vietnam, Brunei and Singapore, convening round tables of women entrepreneurs. That has been very well received. Canada is seen as a leader in supporting women in s...”

Hon. Jim Carr (Minister of International Trade Diversification, Lib.)

September 17th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ects the importance we attach to swift ratification of the new CPTPP so that our farmers, ranchers, entrepreneurs and workers from across the country can get down to the business of tapping new markets and bringing brand Canada to more corners of the world.

There has never been a better time for Canadians to diversify. As a trading nation we need to add to our list of customers and to the roster of our innovative, hard-working, entrepreneurial and ambitious sellers.

Today I am meeting with my counterpart from the United Kingdom. In the last two weeks I was in Israel, Thailand and Singapore. After the United States withdrew, Canada took the lead in March 2017, relaunching stalled talks for the old TPP and then working tirelessly to secure a deal that reflected not just the ambitions of the few but the dreams of the many.

This effort was in large part about driving real changes for the middle class who have not always seen their interests reflected in agreements. We changed the terms of trade protecting our intellectual property, our unique culture and we expanded access to a market of 500 million consumers covering 13% of global GDP.

The new CPTPP was renegotiated with a view to looking beyond the few current large exporters to those unaccustomed or ready for new markets, because while competition is a very healthy thing, if workers feel that their quality work going out the front door is undermined by weaker standards of work coming through the back door, support for trade suffers.

Bill C-79 is of critical importance to the Canadian economy. It is vital particularly for our agricultural sectors that are now, even as I speak, reaping the harvests that will soon be shipped to new markets. As we have said from the outset, Canada will be among the first six countries to ratify as long as the House and the other place recognize the opportunity this deal brings to countless hard-working Canadians and move swiftly to pass the bill.

Bill C-79 brings forward all legislative instruments required to ratify and implement the agreement. Other regulatory changes will also be required for Canada to ratify and that regulatory process will follow royal assent of the bill. This is not just a new trade agreement for Canada. This is a signal to the world that trade matters, that rules matter and we will not be drawn into the world of protectionism. This bill is a statement that we will seek out every opportunity and negotiate terms that benefit the middle class and those working hard to join it.

The bill also speaks directly to Canada's diversification imperative. As a middle power, we cannot afford the status quo and we cannot afford to wait for the world to come to us. Our competitiveness depends on opening more markets and making those markets more accessible particularly for small and medium-sized businesses.

On Friday we will celebrate another landmark trade agreement secured under this government, the first anniversary of the trade agreement with Europe, CETA. In just one year, business is booming. Last week we learned container traffic at the port of Montreal is already up year on year 20%. That is 20% more traffic in the made-in-Canada goods Canadians produce each and every day.

In addition to trans-Atlantic trade, we are expanding preferential access across our hemisphere moving forward on a free trade agreement our government initiated with Mercosur, including Brazil, Argentina, Paraguay and Uruguay and enhanced membership with the Pacific alliance, including Mexico, Peru, Chile and Colombia. With the new CPTPP, we extend our reach to the Pacific with an eye to the long term. We are, after all, a Pacific nation.

That is why reorienting and renewing what is now the CPTPP is so critical for us. Asia matters to Canada. Asia is home to the world's fastest-growing middle class. By 2030, nearly two-thirds of the world's middle class, estimated to be 3.5 billion people, will call Asia home. The CPTPP is a cornerstone for Canada's greater engagement with Asia-Pacific countries and solidly anchors Canada's place in the Asian market. (1205)

There are 10 new markets on offer: Australia, Brunei, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore and Vietnam. That is a trading bloc representing close to 500 million people and 13.5% of global GDP. [Translation]

Under the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership, or CPTPP, consumers will benefit from lower prices and greater selection. Workers will also benefit from the creation of more good-quality jobs in all export sectors across Canada. (1210) [English]

The CPTPP translates to benefits for farmers and growers, fisher men and women, lumber jacks and jills, Bay Street and Main Street, miners and chemists, manufacturers and service providers. The CPTPP will also level the playing field for Canadian exporters staying even with competitors that already have preferential access to countries like Japan, the world's third largest economy. Last year our bilateral trade with Japan reached $29 billion; just imagine next year. The opportunities are enormous.

For example, the quality and beauty of Canadian wood is world renowned. In Japan, indeed throughout the Asia-Pacific region, the environmental and structural benefits of wooden construction are being embraced, including plans for a 1,048-foot wooden skyscraper. The home for the world's current tallest wooden building is here in Canada, a residential structure at the University of British Columbia. Incidentally, as Canada's minister of natural resources, I had the pleasure of cutting the ribbon on that project.

With the advent of CPTPP, market opportunities for Canada's forest products sector are inviting and impressive. Canadian high-tech companies like OpenText have been battling and succeeding in the ultra-competitive Asian markets for decades. The IP protections secured in the CPTPP will protect the investments these companies have made in Canada and allow them to compete and win in Asia.

We consulted extensively with Canadians for more than two years to get the agreement right. We fought hard on their behalf to make important changes, suspensions to certain articles or side letters with the full force of international law in areas such as intellectual property, investor-state dispute settlement, culture and autos.

The CPTPP also includes many other significant achievements. For example, financial service providers will benefit from enhanced investment protection and preferential access, including in Malaysia and Vietnam where commitments go far beyond what either country has offered in any FTA.

Through the government procurement chapter, Canadian businesses will be able to access open and fair procurement in all CPTPP markets. CPTPP parties will eliminate tariffs on over 95% of tariff lines, covering 99% of current Canadian exports to CPTPP markets, with the vast majority to be eliminated immediately upon entry into force of this agreement.

The CPTPP also addresses non-tariff measures that we know are prevalent and which create business uncertainty for our exporters. That includes the auto sector where we know non-tariff barriers have been a constant irritant. In addition, the chapter on state-owned enterprises and designated monopolies provides for rules to help ensure that state-owned enterprises operate on a commercial basis and in a non-discriminatory manner when making purchases and sales.

We did not stop there. The CPTPP also includes dedicated chapters on labour, the environment, small and medium-sized enterprises, transparency and anti-corruption. The labour chapter includes binding commitments to ensure that national laws and policies provide protection for fundamental principles and rights at work, including freedom of association, collective bargaining and the elimination of child labour and forced labour. When we relaunched stalled talks, these chapters were on ice. Now, both the labour and environment chapters are fully enforceable through the agreement's dispute settlement mechanism.

We reaffirmed our right to regulate in the public interest. We promoted labour rights, environmental protection, and conservation. We preserved cultural identity and diversity. We promoted corporate social responsibility, gender equality and indigenous rights. Canada is now poised to be the only G7 country with free trade agreements with all of the other G7 countries.

To realize that remarkable value proposition, diversification into new markets must be a national project to which every farmer, rancher, fisher, manufacturer, entrepreneur, business owner and innovator commits their efforts.[Translation]

I want to be very clear: diversification is a national priority. Diversification must be a project to which every farmer, rancher, fisher, manufacturer, entrepreneur, business owner, and innovator commits their efforts. (1215) [English]

The Senate

Hon. Carolyn Stewart Olsen

December 5th
Hansard Link

Mi’kmaq and Maliseet Art

“...is taking a leadership role by supporting our Indigenous artists, who are taking on an increasingly entrepreneurial role. The Aboriginal arts program at the college invites students from both Indigeno...”

Hon. Pierre-Hugues Boisvenu

December 4th
Hansard Link

Oil Tanker Moratorium Bill Second Reading—Debate Continued

“...Globe and Mail article published on October 31, 2017, Martha Hall Findlay, a Toronto businesswoman, entrepreneur, lawyer and politician who is currently CEO of the Canada West Foundation, asked this v...”

Hon. Colin Deacon

November 26th
Hansard Link

Postal Services Resumption and Continuation Bill Third Reading—Debate

“... I cannot ignore; it’s the perspective of a group that does not have a union speaking for them: the entrepreneurs who run micro and small businesses across Canada. The vast majority are not entrepreneurs by choice. They’re entrepreneurs by necessity, especially those in our small, rural and remote communities. Employment continues to be a huge challenge for them. These vulnerable communities are places where, if you want a job, you need to create it. I have enormous admiration for those who, out of a sense of responsibility to themselves, their families and communities, dig deeper and find the courage and tenacity required to create an opportunity and build a business. Clearly, I look at this legislation through that lens. I’ve used the answers to four questions to guide my decision on Bill C-89. The questions are as follows: First, can we reasonably assess the specific business and employment issues being disputed by the parties? Second, what do we do about the troubling workplace injury claims? Third, is there evidence indicating the current labour actions are causing social and economic damage at a level that justifies the legislation? And fourth, what is our role as senators, particularly in how we respond to the wishes of the elected members of the House of Commons? Allow me, if you will, to explain how I’ve answered these questions. During testimony at Committee of the Whole stage on Saturday, we heard two conflicting viewpoints on the business and employment issues. I came away with a few key perspectives. Canada Post, as a business, is experiencing a lot of disruption, from the changing habits of consumers and businesses globally to the increasing competitive pressures in its own market. This is clearly putting a lot of strain on the organization and its employees. Management and workers are experiencing a lot of friction — it seems that’s nothing new — as they try to adjust to rapid changes to the competitive marketplace. They cannot even agree on the underlying market and performance data resulting from the current labour disruption. The two sides have been working to get a deal done for 10 or 11 months yet remain on completely different pages and show no willingness to compromise. (1650) Despite a complete turnover in governance and leadership at Canada Post, with a new board and interim CEO, there has still been no progress. I’ve come to the conclusion these two parties continue to hope the other side will somehow recognize the error of their ways and capitulate. In my experience that never happens, no matter how right I’ve been. That was a bit of a joke for my wife. In short, I don’t see any hope for a negotiated solution. Regarding the concern about on-the-job injuries, some serious claims have been made. Based on provided reports, there are some important problems that need to be explored and better managed. I was very pleased to hear Ms. McDonald state that, “Canada Post needs to bring its injury incidents down dramatically.” I was especially glad to hear her say there were “benchmarking and standards which need to be set up,” so everyone can ensure the improvements are actually occurring. Regardless of how a deal is reached — through legislation or last-minute agreement, which I understand now is not going to happen with the mediator having left the discussions — I think we can all agree it is crucial this issue be addressed. On the issue of injuries, Ms. McDonald has already provided us with assurances of the accountability mechanisms that Canada Post intends to put in place. I’m hopeful we will see meaningful improvement in short order. As it relates to the social and economic impacts resulting from the union’s current actions, I was pleased to hear Mr. Palecek speak about how CUPW is working with Canada Post to make sure the needs of vulnerable individuals are being met. I applaud those efforts. However, I forcefully disagree with his perspective that the backlog of parcels is not a concern and the implication that delays in package delivery are simply a manageable inconvenience. I do not believe this is the case for Canada Post as a service provider within a highly competitive industry. I do not believe that, in the case of micro and small businesses who rely on Canada Post across this country, there is a reasonable alternative. To get a sense of how important the parcel business is to the long-term sustainability of Canada Post, I looked at their 2017 annual report. It identified parcel revenue growth is much higher than the global average, up 23 per cent over the previous year. Within that number, the top 25 e-commerce customers grew by more than 42 per cent in the previous 12 months. When I looked at that against global benchmarks, it became clear Canada Post is dramatically outperforming its international peers in attracting and serving e-commerce customers. That’s good for Canada. As an example of what is happening to the rest of the business, just consider the fact that letter mail volumes have been dropping for 11 straight years. This is a business in a lot of change. Is the parcel business central to Canada Post’s survival? Absolutely. Without the highly competitive parcel business the federal government would be subsidizing Canada Post at an unsustainable level. According to the Canadian Internet Registration Authority, 62 per cent of Canadians prefer to make their purchases online. Canada Post carries two thirds of that total e-commerce volume. Micro and small businesses tend to use third-party e-commerce platforms, like eBay. In those cases Canada Post carries more than 80 per cent of the parcel volume, be it for domestic or export markets. The reality is there is an increasing reliance on online transactions. The vast majority of order fulfillment occurs through Canada Post. In market terms, Canada Post is getting it right. This is good news for Canada and good news for its workers. But do they have the luxury of relaxing as a result of the success of their parcel business? Absolutely not. It’s a highly competitive business. Canadians have quickly become accustomed to high standards when it comes to the delivery of online purchases. A recent UPS study revealed 63 per cent of Canadians expect same-day delivery on orders placed by noon, and 61 per cent expect next-day delivery for orders placed by 5 p.m. While Canada Post and CUPW do not agree on the numbers regarding the current backlog of packages, it’s clear any backlog poses a significant concern for the companies whose packages are not being delivered because of the increasingly stringent delivery standards expected in the marketplace today. The simple fact is customers expect businesses to ensure their product is delivered on time. The business and its logistics partner are one and the same. If customers have any concerns about the timely delivery, they simply do not make that purchase. This very point has been made by several of my honourable colleagues who found themselves deciding against making online purchases from a small business because of the delivery risk caused by the current labour disruptions. My worry is the chilling effect that this strike is having on so many online orders is further distorting the so-called backlog numbers. There is a lot of business not occurring because people are deciding not to make the transaction. For most of these businesses, every single day at this time of year is worth the same as 10 days at any other time of the year. The month of December is simply crucial to their survival. Last week, operators of a small online business in Halifax specializing in handmade scarves, mittens and aprons told CBC in normal years they would be sold out by now. Dale Kearney, who operates Monkeys and More with his wife Sherrie claimed, “the rotating strike is just killing us.” Those who listen to “The House” on CBC Radio 1 on Saturday morning heard the eBay Canada general manager Andrea Stairs report on the recent activity on eBay’s platform. She remarked that, since the strike began, small sellers have been losing market share to the larger organizations who can afford the correspondingly higher prices that alternative parcel delivery options present. Ms. Stairs expressed concern regarding the real challenges that the CUPW strike action is placing on micro-businesses at their busiest selling season, the lead-up to Christmas. This was confirmed in the chamber on Saturday by Ms. McDonald. She told us that, “. . . small businesses are still shipping with us because they have nowhere else to go. It is these small businesses and their employees that will be hit the hardest financially by the delivery delays, refunds and cancelled orders.” Yes, some entrepreneurs in urban areas may have the option to switch to more expensive logistics suppliers, which could be argued to be a sustainable burden. In many and most rural and remote locations, no other options exist. In summary, the continuation of this labour action puts micro and small businesses at significant risk, especially those with less capital and those in smaller rural and remote communities. They are at greater risk of suffering permanent harm. Simply, Canada Post is essential to the survival of their business. Now to our role as the chamber of sober second thought. I vividly recall the debate at third reading of Bill C-45. It was my second day in this chamber. A few statements stand out, particularly speeches made by Senator Pratte and Senator Dalphond. Senator Pratte offered the opinion that if we choose to push against the will of the elected government we should do so in relatively rare cases. He identified that it only be considered in the following situations: First, where the issue is of special importance related to our constitutional role; second, where we are prepared to lead a serious fight and see its completion; third, when a significant part of the public opinion is or could be on our side; and fourth, where there’s a realistic prospect of convincing or forcing the government to change its mind. When I consider Senator Pratte’s conditions, I do not believe they are met in this situation. In terms of the question of Charter rights, I will defer to Senator Gold and Senator Dalphond’s approach. Senator Dalphond offered five different criteria he considered when the other place rejected some of the Senate’s proposed amendments to Bill C-45. These were as follows: . . . will it result in legislation that clearly or most likely violates the Constitution or the Charter of Rights and Freedoms? If the answer is unclear, shall the task of answering that question not be left to the courts? It seems the answer to the first question may be unclear. As a layperson and new senator, I believe my honourable colleague’s second question is key. Given that CUPW has stated it will challenge the legislation in court, it seems the process has already begun and will proceed regardless of whether we can determine constitutionality in this chamber. Second: . . . is the purpose of the bill an election campaign issue for the government, or is it an extremely controversial issue for which voters did not give the government the mandate? Not directly. I would argue the government’s focus on the digital economy makes Bill C-89 central to their ability to deliver on promises made both in their campaign and the Speech from the Throne because it affects entrepreneurship, innovation, the digital economy and the middle class. Third: . . . does the eviden...”

Senator Lankin

November 26th
Hansard Link

Postal Services Resumption and Continuation Bill Third Reading—Debate

“...forward. I think Senator C. Deacon from Nova Scotia’s contribution in talking about micro-business, entrepreneurs and a fundamental change in our economy is an important one. It may be one the parties...”

Ms. Hajdu

November 24th
Hansard Link

Postal Services Resumption and Continuation Bill Committee of the Whole

“...sive investments in innovation, community economic development corporation funding and supports for entrepreneurs of all different stripes, supporting Indigenous entrepreneurs, women entrepreneurs. The list could go on, senator. I will say that we are reducing taxes for small busine...”

Hon. Colin Deacon

October 17th
Hansard Link

Startup Canada Day on the Hill

“Honourable senators, many of you have some idea how passionate I am about innovation, start-ups and entrepreneurship. That is why you will understand I am pleased to stand and tell you today about Startup Canada Day on the Hill. It brings together entrepreneurs, innovators, investors and government officials to talk about how to accelerate Canada’s ability to innovate and compete. Start-ups are central to our future, especially in Atlantic Canada. Let me provide some perspective. Employment in Atlantic Canada had flatlined for more than a decade, certainly in Nova Scotia. That means no net new jobs — every job created just replaced a job lost. Senator Christmas co-authored an important study of this problem, the Ivany report, which made many recommendations. In stark contrast, Atlantic Canadian start-ups are now adding exciting and inspiring jobs at a remarkable rate, growing their employment base by 26 per cent last year alone. Their employment growth is fuelled by sales growth, mainly in export markets, up by 73 per cent last year alone. But statistics only tell part of this story. Many of you have heard about the Hadhad family, refugees sponsored by Senator Coyle’s community of Antigonish. Tareq Hadhad’s family chocolate business was bombed, and they were forced to flee Syria. Following three long years in a refugee camp and within weeks of arriving in Antigonish, they were already making chocolate in their kitchen and selling it at the local farmers’ market. This year it looks like Peace by Chocolate looks like will double their employment to 50 people in the community of Antigonish. One more story, about Barb Stegemann. This journalist became an unexpected entrepreneur when her best friend, Captain Trevor Greene, was severely injured by a member of the Taliban, who put an axe in his head in Afghanistan in 2006. It was a horrific event that I am sure we all recall. Barb was determined to continue her friend’s mission to build peace and found her way when she learned about Abdullah Arsala, an Afghani man who was encouraging farmers to switch from growing poppies for opium to growing orange blossoms and roses for perfume. Barb’s start-up was born, making perfume from essential oils sourced from countries rebuilding after war or strife and offering farmers a fair trade and sustainable source of income. Barb launched 7 Virtues Perfume with her Visa card in her garage and eight weeks later became the first Atlantic Canadian woman to land a deal on “Dragons’ Den” on CBC. Importantly, Brett Wilson not only became Barb’s investor but her mentor, too, providing critical advice and support. Today Barb has expanded her work to more than six countries, including Haiti and Rwanda. And Abdullah Arsala, her first supplier, earns twice as much as he could have in the illegal poppy trade. Other suppliers, like Nicholas Hitimana in Rwanda, now earn three times what they otherwise could make. Honourable senators, that is the power of start-ups. And those are just two little stories. Tareq Hadhad, Brett Wilson and entrepreneurs from 50 communities across our country will be at Startup Canada Day on the Hill tonig...”

Hon. Colin Deacon

October 4th
Hansard Link

Speech from the Throne Motion for Address in Reply—Debate Continued

“...munities. One of the main reasons is a failed connection between the researcher’s discovery and the entrepreneurs and other partners who can successfully apply that solution to meet a pressing need. If the research discovery is not connected to a specific customer and problem, then it’s the proverbial tree falling in the forest with no one there to hear. When it works, when you bring Canadian research out of the university lab to a stage where it’s actually applied, helping people in Canada and around the world, now that’s satisfying. That’s been my experience with BlueLight Analytics. I came across a seemingly minor discovery at Dalhousie University, but it provided a unique insight into a really big clinical problem in restorative dentistry. That’s the world of dental fillings and I know we all love those. You’ll be surprised to learn that there are more than $60 billion of fillings placed every year into North American mouths, but they’re only lasting a third as long as they did two decades ago. The problem isn’t the quality of the materials or the skill of the dentist, it’s the information available to the dentist at the chair side. Unbeknownst to the dentist, the blue light or the curing light used to cure those fillings in patients’ mouths — and many of you have had that done — often doesn’t deliver the correct energy. This is an invisible problem that has a big impact on patient care. At BlueLight we used our understanding of this problem to build a global business with customers in 35 countries. The talented team leading this work has expertise in dental materials, optics, machine learning, design thinking, the so-called “internet of things” and enterprise level sales. It started because of one small but important insight, but it is succeeding because it answers some very real problems faced by dental manufacturers and dentists. We were only able to commercialize the technology because we raised seed capital from angel investors and because this private equity enabled us to access important federal programs like ACOA, SR&ED and IRAP. I can personally attest to the importance of these federal programs for start-ups. They play a crucial role as Halifax and Atlantic Canada become a start-up hub, attracting investment from sophisticated investors in Europe, Seattle, Silicon Valley, Boston and even some pretty impressive groups in Upper and Lower Canada, as we say in the Maritimes. I’ll share one more story — about Kay MacPhee, a schoolteacher on Prince Edward Island, a single mother of two, one of whom was born profoundly deaf. Kay travelled across North America to learn the best techniques to teach her son to speak and read. In the mid-1970s, she stumbled upon the realization that those with dyslexia experienced tremendous improvements in their reading skills when she used the techniques that worked for hearing-impaired kids. This was a crucial discovery — a crucial insight. She developed a program called SpellRead, and it proved groundbreaking for people of all ages who were struggling to read. It actually worked. I first discovered SpellRead by chance, when it was a small program being taught to 25 students in Charlottetown. The company was so small at that time that their business cards didn’t even have an area code. We turned Kay’s knowledge into a scalable program, built a team, raised some equity and eventually expanded to 200 individual locations. The program was studied by leading U.S. researchers, written up in numerous publications and presented at the 2002 World Congress on Dyslexia. In all cases the researchers reported that SpellRead “closed the gap” in reading skills of severely reading disabled students as compared to their peers with normal reading skills. But what I saw week after week made the reports, clinical studies and high praise pale by comparison. I got to visit inner city schools in New York City, Baltimore, Washington, D.C., and many other locations, and I got to meet these kids who struggled with reading and other significant barriers in their lives. It was deeply inspiring to watch kids in the SpellRead classes as their world started to open up before them. Whether in Grade 1, Grade 9 or an adult, the students needed no convincing as to the importance of learning to read, they just needed to be provided a program that worked. We all know the statistics — the high correlation between literacy skills, employment, economic success and good health. The impact of this innovation was truly priceless. But, again, the idea itself — in this case the SpellRead program — is of limited value without a sustainable business case. Without it, 25 students benefited. But with it, thousands of students in 200 locations, mainly in the United States, were able to benefit from the program. You will have noticed I said we were mainly in the United States. We tried and failed to interest Canadian schools in the program. As many of you know, Canada’s illiteracy rate is far too high and disproportionately affects our most vulnerable citizens. Illiteracy has been the subject of 50 years of federal and provincial studies, legislative efforts and shared programs yet the problem persists. Even this week, one of our colleagues spoke passionately about this important issue. I was more than pleased to realize that no fewer than five of my new colleagues — that I’m very glad to call my new colleagues — have spoken about the economic and social anchor of illiteracy in this chamber recently. I believe the problem persists because of how we have defined it. For example, in the House of Commons — or perhaps I should say “the other place” — there have been repeated efforts to pass a bill establishing a national literacy policy promoting appreciation of the importance of literacy. I believe that bill misses the boat. It’s focuses on the wrong problem. I’ve met hundreds of people who struggle with literacy but not one who lacked the desire to learn to read or awareness of its importance. Too often they avoid seeking help to avoid the pain of repeated failure. I think it’s fundamentally unfair to ask some of our most vulnerable citizens to try harder, unless we’re absolutely certain that we’re using effective, evidence-based instructional methods. As I say, that was the approach in the other place. This chamber took a different approach in the 2009 report from the Senate Social Affairs Committee, called Early Childhood Development and Care: Next Steps. It supported an evidence-based approach to reducing the risk of illiteracy and helping our most vulnerable citizens to succeed. It proposed using evidence-based programming to ensure that all children have effective foundational skills. You wouldn’t think that would be groundbreaking in 2009 but it was. From my perspective, the report connected the right problem to the right solution. SpellRead provided me with irrefutable evidence that the problem is never one of motivation; the problem is that our current teaching methods aren’t working for too many kids. Students aren’t failing; we’re failing students. Colleagues, I hope you see why I am so passionate about start-ups. They’re about so much more than just technology. They’re about helping real people to solve real problems. That’s why I applied to become a member of this chamber. I want to amplify the voices of entrepreneurs in the Senate of Canada so that together we can work to create and improve the conditions to enable our entrepreneurs and innovators to thrive and grow. They’re the prow of our economic ship. Theirs are the voices that are creating our future. The problems they’re grappling with are our problems, too. The potential is tremendously exciting. But there’s a lot of work to do. In May, the Conference Board of Canada issued its annual report card on innovation, reporting that Canada and nearly all of our provinces are losing ground as our international peers are surging ahead. That report makes for sober reading, but there is a bright spot. Canada earned its only A for entrepreneurial ambition, which is, in the words of this report, “a measure of the share of the working-age population reporting early-stage entrepreneurial activity, such as attempts to establish or own a new business.” This says that Canad...”

Senator Andreychuk

June 20th
Hansard Link

Parliamentary Budget Officer Yves Giroux Received in Committee of the Whole

“...gender-based analysis and making analyses of programs, particularly on budgets, helping young women entrepreneurs, et cetera? Have you given that any thought?”

Hon. A. Raynell Andreychuk

June 19th
Hansard Link

Budget Implementation Bill, 2018, No. 1 Twenty-ninth Report of National Finance Committee on Subject Matter--Debate Continued

“...esses recommended an exemption for spouses from the income sprinkling rules. With respect to female entrepreneurs, Dr. Nadia Alam, President, Ontario Medical Association, in her appearance before the ...”

Hon. Yonah Martin (Deputy Leader of the Opposition)

June 19th
Hansard Link

Budget Implementation Bill, 2018, No. 1 Twenty-ninth Report of National Finance Committee on Subject Matter--Debate Continued

“... families working day and night to make ends meet to put food on the table. They represent aspiring entrepreneurs who envision bettering the lives of others through their innovation. They represent medical doctors, accountants, lawyers, who have gone through years of rigorous training. In light of the Trudeau government’s announcement that it would cut the small business tax rate to 9 per cent, effective January 1, 2019, in support of the middle class and those working hard to become a part of it, what they are not telling Canadians is that the new measures included in this bill will make it harder for small businesses to qualify for the small business tax rate. The new rules on passive income, coupled with the new income sprinkling rules, which abruptly came to an end this past January, along with other provisions set out in this bill, will have small businesses paying more tax, not less. According to a report from the Government of Canada entitled Tax Measures: Supplementary Information, the government itself expects to collect $43 million in extra revenue in the current fiscal year through the changes in passive income rules. By 2023, it projects to collect additional tax revenue totalling $2.3 billion. To me, this sounds like pickpocketing the middle class and those working hard to become a part of this class. What is passive income, and why is it important in this context? Passive income is derived from any source in which the investor does not have active participation in the business. This includes investment in bonds, stocks, limited partnerships, income trust funds, et cetera. This is different from the day-to-day income one earns from their business, for example, sales of goods and services. This matters because passive investments allow businesses to diversify their income streams and permit them to put away money for future anticipated needs. Businesses may use passive income during the bottom of the business cycle, when sales are down and they need to offset losses incurred. Passive income can also be used to save for new equipment or property for the future. The government’s new rules would essentially penalize businesses for earning passive investment income. Under the new rules, businesses that earn anything above the $50,000 passive-income threshold would effectively see their small business deduction limit shrink, until they no longer qualify for the small business tax rate. Any business that earns $150,000, $100,000 in excess of the $50,000 threshold, in passive income would in effect be ineligible for the small business tax rate. At second reading of this bill on June 11, I asked Senator Mitchell, the sponsor, how toughening the rules of passive income and income sprinkling will help small businesses. To that, the senator replied, ". . . passive investments don’t create jobs. . . ." I respectfully disagree. If government discourages small businesses from investing in passive income, they will be left more vulnerable should there be an economic downturn. Passive investments allow businesses to keep staff when the going gets tough. Think of it as a rainy day fund. Small business owners assume risk and often forego salaries for themselves to ensure the success of their business. I find it unfitting for government to impose a one-size-fits-all policy to Canadian-controlled private corporations, CCPCs. Each small business faces unique sets of opportunities and challenges, and Canadian business owners have a much better understanding of their own challenges and opportunities than the government. In fact, a recent petition tabled in the House of Commons last Monday was signed by more than 45,000 Canadians calling on the government to abandon its package of small business tax changes. In the current climate of protectionism, passive income has become ever so important. Along with the ongoing, shaky NAFTA negotiations, which includes a potentially dangerous trade war with the United States, our biggest trading partner, Canadian businesses need the government’s support more than ever. It is exactly for uncertain times like this that small businesses put aside money. It lessens the financial impact during economic hardships. More than 70 per cent of our exports go to the United States. The two economies are closely intertwined, and the current state of the bilateral trade relations means a hard hit for Canadian businesses and their employees. (2010) What is even more insulting to small businesses in Canada is the federal government going back on its word about grandfathering existing passive investments. Initially the government promised that passive investments held before the new rules came into force would be exempt. Dan Kelly, President of the Canadian Federation of Independent Business, said: The proposed rules penalize businesses that have been compliant with the law and acted prudently in the face of economic uncertainly and risk by creating a capital reserve through passive investments. We’re asking the government to keep the promise they made to the small business community and protect firms with previous passive investments from the new rules before the budget is signed into law. By breaking this promise, the federal government will now be unfairly taxing businesses who have held passive investments well before and shortly after the original changes were announced. Matthew MacAdam, partner and leader for tax services in Nova Scotia at Grant Thornton said that the government’s change of heart was unexpected in the Canadian business world. He went on to say that he felt for clients “who transferred passive assets into their corporations ahead of the budget, thinking they were doing themselves a favour, only to realize today that their passive income will cause the corporation to lose some of its small business deduction starting in 2019.” These unfair tax changes will have a ripple effect, cutting into other industries, including the financial industry. RBC President and CEO Dave McKay said: We would certainly encourage the federal government to look at these issues because, in real time, we’re seeing capital flow out of the country. . . . if we don’t keep the capital here, we can’t keep the people here . . . . Investors follow certainty. We are sending the wrong signals to entrepreneurs and investors with these changes. Senator Mitchell also proudly stated that the Trudea...”

Hon. Peter Harder (Government Representative in the Senate)

June 18th
Hansard Link

New Senator Congratulations on Appointment

“...ovince of Nova Scotia. [Translation] Senator Deacon’s career has been remarkable. As a 21st-century entrepreneur, he understands that innovation is key to economic development. His success in business extends to the charitable sector, where he has been very active on the board of various organizations dedicated to children’s health and well-being and to helping those in need in Halifax. [English] We also understand the importance of innovation for a strong economy. What Senator Deacon brings to this chamber is experience helping transform ideas into products and services that improve lives, create jobs and contribute to a stronger Canadian economy. As an entrepreneur and leader, Senator Deacon has played an important role in leading and helping grow tec...”

Hon. Larry W. Smith (Leader of the Opposition)

June 18th
Hansard Link

New Senator Congratulations on Appointment

“...as the official opposition and all senators within the Senate. Senator Deacon’s great success as an entrepreneur and a venture capitalist, combined with his extensive civic involvement in his home pro...”

Hon. Yuen Pau Woo

June 18th
Hansard Link

New Senator Congratulations on Appointment

“...with wealth creation. Enter Senator Deacon from Nova Scotia, who has a track record as a technology entrepreneur, a start-up champion and a venture capitalist. Some of his accomplishments include BlueLight Analytics, a company that is dedicated to improving the quality of restorative dentistry, and SpellRead, a company focused on improving reading skills among kids. He is also entrepreneur in residence at Startup Zone, P.E.I., a Charlottetown organization that helps entrepreneurs to explore and test an idea as quickly and inexpensively as possible. Senator Deacon a...”

Hon. Percy E. Downe

June 18th
Hansard Link

New Senator Congratulations on Appointment

“...ken, and I won’t repeat them, I fully endorse what has been said. Your business experience and your entrepreneurship has always come with a human side of helping the less fortunate. As Senator Woo ind...”

Hon. Percy Mockler

June 18th
Hansard Link

Budget Implementation Bill, 2018, No. 1 Twenty-ninth Report of National Finance Committee on Subject Matter—Debate Adjourned

“...Honourable senators, this lack of clarity and confusion will not only hurt many individual Canadian entrepreneurs, it will also harm Canada’s ability to maintain its tax competitiveness — even as the ...”


Filed Regulations

Trademarks Regulations: SOR/2018-227

October 30, 2018 SOR/2018-227
TRADE-MARKS ACT
Gazette Link

“...with other players in the innovation ecosystem, strategies are being considered to better understand the needs of groups such as women and indigenous entrepreneurs in order to offer tailored products to support their participation in the IP system.

“One-for-One” Rule

The &l...”


Order Fixing November 5, 2018 as the Day on which Certain Provisions of the two Acts Come into Force: SI/2018-49

2018 July 11,
COMBATING COUNTERFEIT PRODUCTS ACT ECONOMIC ACTION PLAN 2015 ACT, NO. 1
Gazette Link

“...ustrial designs.

Implications

Budget 2018 announced a national IP strategy with the goal of helping Canadian businesses, innovators, and entrepreneurs understand and protect their IP rights. Ensuring clarity of procedures and determining when deadlines occur is crucial to make sure that...”


Industrial Design Regulations: SOR/2018-120

2018 June 12,
INDUSTRIAL DESIGN ACT
Gazette Link

“...PO continues to enhance these outreach efforts, strategies are being considered to better understand the needs of groups such as women and indigenous entrepreneurs to tailor CIPO’s programs and products to improve support for their participation in the IP system.

Contact

Public en...”


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