Coal: The Last Six Months
Of Federal Activity

About

This Report

This is a computer-generated report that shows all of the federal activity with respect to the keyword "Coal" over the last six months. This is a demonstration of the power of our government relations automation software.

Hansard

House: 216 Speeches
Senate: 35 Speeches

House Senate

Bills

Active: 0

Regulations

Filed: 0
Proposed: 0

The House

Jean Rioux (Liberal)

March 21st
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“...mbers of the House are well aware, they are accomplishing a wide variety of tasks in support of the coalition. Our CAF personnel are contributing a great deal to this success, and we remain committed ...”

Hélène Laverdière (NDP)

March 20th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...ronto, Cycle Toronto, Ontario By Bike, Glacier Raft Company, Golden, B.C., Greater Victoria Cycling Coalition, BC Healthy Living Alliance, Saskatoon Cycles, Jane's Walk, in Ontario, Vélo Québec, Pi...”

Wayne Stetski (NDP)

March 20th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...roups, of course. They include whitewater rafters in British Columbia, the Greater Victoria Cycling Coalition, BC Healthy Living Alliance, Saskatoon Cycles, Canada Bikes, Citizens for Safe Cycling, Wa...”

Harjit S. Sajjan (Liberal)

March 9th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“... than 4,000 Canadian Armed Forces personnel served in the Persian Gulf as part of the international coalition of countries that forced the invading forces of Iraq from neighbouring Kuwait. (1045)

Our brave service men and women also made their mark this century battling terrorism and helping bring democracy to Afghanistan. The mission involved over 40,000 of our personnel, the largest deployment since the Second World War. The Canadian Forces' critical role in various wars has put Canada on the world stage, earning the respect and admiration of our allies and opposing forces alike. So too has our unwavering determination to keep the peace. More than 26,000 Canadians answered the call of a newly formed United Nations to help maintain international peace and security in Korea in the early 1950s. Canadians have taken part in repeated peacekeeping missions ever since, from the Suez Canal to the Sinai and Cyprus to Bosnia and Somalia. Time and again, Canadian Armed Forces members have been willing to put their lives at risk, whether courageously defending our country's values or contributing to international peace and security.

This proud heritage carries on today as the world community continues to look to the Canadian Armed Forces in times of need. Our current operations around the globe reinforce that the Canadian Armed Forces does not let countries in a crisis down.

I can point to our personnel's work in the Middle East. This includes Operation Artemis, our counterterrorism and maritime security operations across the Red Sea, the Gulf of Aden, the Gulf of Oman, and the Indian Ocean.

For Operation Impact, Canada's contribution to the Middle East stabilization force, the multinational coalition to degrade and ultimately defeat Daesh, the Canadian Armed Forces has deployed some 830 highly skilled personnel to conduct air operations, provide training and assistance to Iraqi security forces, increase the capabilities of regional forces, and provide medical services to the coalition forces. As of March 6, the Aurora has surveyed some 5,300 points of interest while the Polaris aircraft has delivered some 40.5 million pounds of fuel to coalition aircraft. This is what our Canadian Armed Forces personnel contribute.

Then there is...”

Randall Garrison (NDP)

March 9th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“.... They can now serve and are now an important part of what we can contribute to those international coalitions and obligations.

The one part I am concerned about and that my party is concerned a...”

Rachel Blaney (NDP)

March 9th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...ke coordination and armed reconnaissance coordination that will provide critical information to the coalition forces. If required, they can provide search and rescue missions. As of March 4, 2017, Aur...”

Cheryl Gallant (Conservative)

March 9th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...econd-class treatment from a Prime Minister who devalues the dangers they face every day. All other coalition soldiers receive special compensation through reduced taxation on their earnings. Last Sep...”

Leona Alleslev (Liberal)

March 9th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...sible for command and control of Operation Impact, as well as for the coordination of operations at coalition headquarters. Joint Task Force-Iraq is collecting and processing intelligence, helping to ...”

Jean-Claude Poissant (Liberal)

March 9th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...he Great Big Crunch, an event organized by FoodShare in partnership with Food Secure Canada and the Coalition for Healthy School Food.

I am proud to be the principal partner for this day for the...”

Cathay Wagantall (Conservative)

March 9th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“... dangers inherent in the region. There may be times when they will have to defend themselves, their coalition partners, or the forces they are mentoring.” However, his department decided they did no...”

Pierre Poilievre (Conservative)

March 7th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...arbon black is a material produced by the incomplete combustion of heavy petroleum products such as coal tar. Carbon black is used to produce pigment for ink, the kind of ink the government is using t...”

Luc Berthold (Conservative)

March 7th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...nation? Why is it so important that we address this issue today? I would like to quote the Canadian Coalition for Genetic Fairness, which said:

Genetic discrimination occurs when people are treated unfairly because of actual or perceived differences in their genetic information that may cause or increase the risk to develop a disorder or disease.

We are not talking about someone with a disease, or someone who is suffering, or someone undergoing treatment. We are talking about someone who may have a gene that could eventually result in that person developing a disease.

The Coalition goes on to provide examples.

For example, a health insurer might refuse to give coverage to a woman who has a genetic difference that raises her odds of getting ovarian cancer. Employers also could use genetic information to decide whether to hire, promote or terminate workers.

This is all based on the results of a genetic test. The Canadian Coalition for Genetic Fairness also said:

The fear of discrimination can discourage individuals from making decisions and choices, which may be in their best interest. For example, a person may decide not to have a genetic test for fear of consequences to their career or the loss of insurance for their family, despite knowing that early detection and treatment could improve their health and longevity.

That is what the Canadian Coalition for Genetic Fairness has said and how it describes the situation.

The concrete examp...”

Don Davies (NDP)

March 7th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...of witnesses supported the legislation as originally proposed. This view was echoed by the Canadian Coalition for Genetic Fairness, a diverse alliance of organizations that advocate on behalf of the f...”

Pam Damoff (Liberal)

March 7th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...rocketed to almost 35,000, with tests available for more than 10,000 conditions.

The Canadian Coalition for Genetic Fairness is a group of 18 organizations dedicated to establishing protections from genetic discrimination for all Canadians. Members include the ALS Society of Canada, the Alzheimer Society of Canada, Muscular Dystrophy Canada, the MS Society of Canada, Osteoporosis Canada, and 13 more. They have stated that cases of genetic discrimination have been documented in Canada and are continuing to grow. As they remind us, all Canadians are impacted by genetic discrimination. Each of us has dozens of genetic mutations that could increase or decrease our risk of getting diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, cancer, Parkinson's, or Alzheimer's disease.

While I was aware that genetic testing was available, like most Canadians I had not given it a lot of thought. While I knew that my father's colon cancer made it more likely for me to develop the same cancer, there was not a genetic test available for that particular cancer. I knew about the BRCA gene and its connection to breast and ovarian cancer, but it was not until last year, when I had a meeting with Ovarian Cancer Canada, that I was shocked to learn of the discrimination that is taking place in our country based on genetics.

Ovarian cancer is an insidious disease that is notoriously hard to detect. There is no reliable early detection test. It is the third most common reproductive cancer in women and one of the most deadly. I was told the story of two sisters who had a history of ovarian cancer in their family. Their doctors recommended genetic testing, as their prognosis would greatly improve with the knowledge gained from these tests. One sister had the testing, was positive for the gene, and had surgery to remove her ovaries. The other sister was told her insurance would be cancelled if she tested positive, so despite the fact that the test could potentially save her life, she was afraid to risk losing her insurance and did not get genetic testing.

Just last night, I received a letter from a constituent who wished to stay anonymous out of fear of discrimination. She disclosed that she and her daughter had a genetic test that found that they both had a gene that could leave them blind. She questioned the fairness of allowing a simple genetic test to undermine her future access to employment and insurance, and she worried about her daughter and the effect it could have on her career and future. She reminded me that we live in Canada, a country where we celebrate our differences. We protect one another from race, colour, sex, and disability discrimination.

In an article posted yesterday, representatives from Ovarian Cancer Canada and the Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs wrote:

For a young woman taking her first steps in building a professional career, the “wrong” genetic test results can impose a new glass ceiling....

Tomorrow is International Women's Day, and members of this House will have an opportunity to enhance women's health by allowing them to use genetic testing for early detection, monitoring, and intervention without the fear of being discriminated against. (1755)

Last year I had the opportunity to speak with Rabbi Stephen Wise from the Shaarei-Beth El congregation in Oakville. He shared with me the prevalence of certain genetic diseases within the Jewish community. He said that Bill S-201 would save lives. In fact, the Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs, a member of the Canadian Coalition for Genetic Fairness, which appeared as a witness before the justice committee, stated, ...”

Catherine McKenna (Liberal)

February 24th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...e to work with the Government of Saskatchewan on our climate change plan; for example, to phase out coal and to invest in innovation. I also had the chance to go to Saskatchewan. I listened to farmers...”

Alexandre Boulerice (NDP)

February 23rd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...gas emissions because it lowered energy consumption in places where people heated with gas, oil, or coal; and it created jobs because people and small businesses needed workers to replace windows and ...”

Cheryl Gallant (Conservative)

February 23rd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...hind Ontario's energy disaster are now running the country”. The author then asks, “Phasing out coal, a feverish pursuit of green energy, new tax regimes—where have we all heard this before?”

Posted December 7, 2016, by Graeme Gordon, it sets out in clear language the carbon tax controversy in Ontario and what Canadians can expect with the same person in charge in Ottawa. Quoting the CBC:

It is uncontroversial to call Ontario's energy situation a disaster. As [the liberal Premier] has herself conceded: Ontarians are now having to choose between paying the electricity bill and buying food or paying rent.

The article then clearly points out who was responsible for the carbon tax on electricity fiasco in Ontario, the Prime Minister's top adviser, Gerald Butts.

...it was former premier Dalton McGuinty and his Liberal team from 2003 to 2012—including his former principal secretary and “policy guru” Gerald Butts—who set Ontario onto this financially bleak, dead-end road. And now, Butts is headed on the same path, leading not the Premier, but the Prime Minister, on the way down.

Butts was, according to the Toronto Star, “the man they call 'the brains behind the operation” and the “policy architect of the Liberal government since 2003.”

Butts departed from McGuinty's government in 2008, but not before he and the Ontario Liberal team set the stage for the ill-fated Green Energy Act, in part, by signing onto dubious wind power projects and its cripplingly inefficient Renewable Energy Standard Offer Program (RESOP).

Let us be clear, as the CBC pointed out:

Butts himself takes—credit for initially enacting and seeing through those energy policies.

As the Toronto Star reported in 2012, “On his biography page at the WWF website, Butts cites how he was 'intimately' involved with the McGuinty government's environmental initiatives.” Another Canadian Press article made it clear that Ontario's energy policy was Butts' design, “McGuinty's plan came from his senior adviser, Gerald Butts.”

Butts has graduated to the halls of Parliament Hill as [the Prime Minister's] own principal secretary, leaving behind a province still paying the price, literally, for his tenure. His promise to eliminate coal, for example—a worthy gambit, if done fiscally responsibly—cost Ontario consumers an extra $37 billion between 2006 and 2014, according to an auditor general, and is expected to cost another $133 billion from 2015 to 2032. (1140)

Let us read what else the CBC had to say about Gerald Butts:

Now he's doubling down, via the prime minister, on his green energy gambit by promising to enact carbon pricing regimes (read: tax) on all provinces by 2018 and phasing out coal by 2030, even as our neighbour and biggest competitor [the United States] moves in the opposite direction. How team...[Butts] sees a carbon-priced Canada competing against the U.S. on an off-kilter playing field confounds most people's common sense....

The federal Liberals, under the stewardship of Butts, has already run a projected $30 billion deficit in its first year in office.

This comes after promising a $10 billion deficit for each of the first three years. It is a $60 billion broken promise.

Phasing out all coal by 2030 will have a cost that will add to that deficit. (This sounds awfully familiar, no?) For...”

Francesco Sorbara (Liberal)

February 23rd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...t strongly in support of a price on pollution by joining the World Bank's carbon pricing leadership coalition. It is why many leading corporations, including Suncor, Canadian Tire, and General Electri...”

Cathay Wagantall (Conservative)

February 23rd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...aking things better. We already do some of the best farming and best industry in the country.

Coal in Estevan was visited by the minister, and she made very little mention of it. I am wondering ...”

Kelly McCauley (Conservative)

February 23rd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...he Conservative government that established regulations to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the coal-fired electricity sector. We were the first country to ban the construction of traditional coal units under these guidelines. Our previous Conservative government also pursued a responsible s...”

Jonathan Wilkinson (Liberal)

February 23rd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“... in the framework include the following: accelerating the phase-out of highly polluting traditional coal power; developing a clean fuels standard to stimulate greater user of biofuels; investing in pu...”

Robert Sopuck (Conservative)

February 23rd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...is simply math. The math also says, if we look at what China is doing right now, it is building two coal-fired projects every single week.

How does the carbon tax, or, more correctly, a carbon d...”

Linda Duncan (NDP)

February 23rd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...>The reason Alberta moved forward first, and then the Liberal government followed, in shutting down coal-fired power sooner was not simply because it was one of the largest sources of carbon in Albert...”

Dan Albas (Conservative)

February 23rd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...rors.

Let me explain. Not long ago, the Liberals made hoopla announcing that they were ending coal burning power by 2030, despite the fact that most provinces already do not utilize coal power or are already on the way to doing precisely that. It sounded like the Liberals were taking action, yet quietly, the Liberals turned around and gave extensions to the two provinces that use coal power to continue doing so after the year 2030. In other words, that announcement was also all ...”

Carol Hughes (NDP)

February 22nd
Hansard Link

Routine Proceedings

“...ore than 500 individuals, in support of the Algoma passenger train service. It was sponsored by the Coalition for Algoma Passenger Trains, which created two online petitions as well as postcard and paper petition campaigns.[Translation]

The Coalition for Algoma Passenger Trains wants to remind the government that for more than 100 years th...”

Joël Godin (Conservative)

February 21st
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...illor; Alan Wells, chair of the Rouge Park Alliance; Heather Moeser, former executive member of the Coalition of Scarborough Community Associations ; Keith Laushway, chair of the Waterfront Regenerati...”

Jim Eglinski (Conservative)

February 21st
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ght now. Yellowhead also has active mining, and it is an energy-producing region with oil, gas, and coal.

However, tourism is one of Yellowhead's economic drivers, because of Jasper National Par...”

Sven Spengemann (Liberal)

February 17th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...es, the Mississauga—Lakeshore skyline was defined by the Four Sisters, the smokestacks of the old coal-burning Lakeview generating station. Since this plant was taken down, over 10 years ago, the co...”

Catherine McKenna (Liberal)

February 17th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...t was nothing to do with the Conservatives. It was because the Liberal government in Ontario closed coal-fired plants and also because the economy was not doing well.

We understand we need to pu...”

Peter Julian (NDP)

February 17th
Hansard Link

Routine Proceedings

“...quire comprehensive, independent health and environmental impact assessments before considering new coal shipping projects; to implement a credible, inclusive, broad, and open consultation process; an...”

Gary Anandasangaree (Liberal)

February 17th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...uge Park. There were a number of other organizations that preceded me, including the save the Rouge coalition. It was set up 30 years ago and started its great work in achieving this dream.

The ...”

Pierre Nantel (NDP)

February 16th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“... (1120)

I would also cite as an example that in 2013 Longueuil decided to join the Canadian Coalition of Municipalities Against Racism and Discrimination under UNESCO. The municipality subsequ...”

David Sweet (Conservative)

February 16th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“... and by a voluntary group of parliamentarians here in Parliament, called the Canadian Parliamentary Coalition to Combat Antisemitism, in a report in 2010.

When the term Islamophobia stands up to...”

Jean Rioux (Liberal)

February 15th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... our strategy, which was developed with the Iraqi government's consent and in consultation with our coalition partners.

Canada will supply equipment such as small arms, personal protective equip...”

Scott Reid (Conservative)

February 15th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...ee on International Human Rights from 2008 to 2015. Second, I co-chaired the Canadian Parliamentary Coalition to Combat Anti-Semitism in 2010 and 2011.

Let me start by noting the very close textural relationship between Motion No. 103, which we are debating today, and the Conservative Party's motion, which we will be debating tomorrow. Both condemn all forms of systemic racism and religious discrimination. Both use identical language to instruct the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage to undertake a study on hate crime and to seek out ways of reducing or eliminating discrimination. Both instruct the committee to report back to the House in 240 days.

The two motions differ in only three particulars.

First, the Conservative motion condemns racism, religious intolerance, and discrimination against all of Canada's largest religious groups: Muslims, Jews, Christians, Sikhs, and Hindus, while Motion No. 103 mentions only Islam by name.

Second, the focus of Motion No. 103 is on the undefined term Islamophobia rather than on protecting Muslims as individuals. This implies that what Canada needs is state protection for faiths rather than for the safety of the faithful.

Finally, the Conservative motion specifically names, as the paradigmatic example of impermissible hatred, what it describes as “the recent and senseless violent acts at a Quebec City mosque”. This wording reiterates that it is the faithful who must be protected rather than the faiths they profess, since eternal truth is under the protection of an almighty and all-loving protector far more powerful than the Government of Canada.

Based on these distinctions, I will be voting against Motion No. 103 in favour of the alternative motion which we will be debated tomorrow.

The contrast between these two motions is reminiscent of a similar contrast between the motions considered during the course of a decade-long debate at the United Nations Human Rights Council.

In 1999, Pakistan introduced a motion calling for all UN member states to take measures in their domestic law to ban the defamation of religions. Pakistan's motion went through a number of incarnations. Initially it referred only to Islamophobia, but as time went on, reference was made to other religions as well. For example, the 2009 version condemned the defamation of religion as a human rights violation and authorized an annual report “on all manifestations of defamation of religions and in particular, on the serious implications of Islamophobia”.

Pakistan's set of motions met with consistent opposition from many democracies, including both Canada and the United States, and from many civil liberties groups as well. Human rights groups pointed out that this measure could have the effect of authorizing or even mandating domestic blasphemy laws, with citizens of any complying state potentially being found guilty in their domestic courts of blaspheming against religions in which they had never been participants or believers.

As well, in 2007, the United Nations Special Rapporteur on Contemporary Forms of Racism, himself a Muslim, reported back that the special and isolated reference to Islam in the motion was widely seen as creating what he referred to as “the hierarchization of forms of discrimination”.

Eileen Donahoe's critique of the motion is also worth repeating. She was President Obama's ambassador to the United Nations. She said:

We cannot agree that prohibiting speech is the way to promote tolerance, and because we continue to see the “defamation of religions” concept used to justify censorship, criminalization, and in some cases violent assaults and deaths of political, racial, and religious minorities around the world.

In 2011, this deadlock was broken when the United States and Pakistan co-authored a new resolution which was adopted as Resolution 16/18, under the title, ”Combating intolerance, negative stereotyping and stigmatization of, and discrimination, incitement to violence and violence against, persons based on religion or belief.” It is a long but comprehensive title.

Resolution 16/18 bears the same relationship to the Pakistani delegations's previous motions that the motion we will be debating tomorrow bears to Motion No. 103, which we are debating today.

This episode reminds us that freedom of religion and freedom of speech are not opposed concepts. It is no accident that they are protected side-by-side in the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. (1855)

Section 2 of the charter reads as follows:

2. Everyone has the following fundamental freedoms:

(a) freedom of conscience and religion;

(b) freedom of thought, belief, opinion and expression, including freedom of the press and other media of communication;

(c) freedom of peaceful assembly; and

(d) freedom of association.

We cannot have one of these freedoms unless the others are protected in equal measure. We cannot have freedom of religion without having the ability to try to convince others to share in one's thoughts and beliefs and therefore to abandon the religion, or absence of religion, to which they presently adhere. We cannot have freedom of religion if we cannot assemble peacefully to pray, whether that be in a church, a mosque, a synagogue, or a public place. We cannot have freedom of religion if we cannot associate with other like-minded individuals.

To better make the point about the spirit that lies behind tomorrow's motion, and to distinguish it more clearly from Motion No. 103, let me now turn to the classic jurisprudence on the issue of the relationship between speech and safety, which comes from the Supreme Court of the United States in its 1919 ruling in Schenck v. United States. Speaking for the unanimous court, Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes wrote the following:

The most stringent protection of free speech would not protect a man in falsely shouting fire in a theatre and causing a panic.... The question in every case is whether the words used are used in such circumstances and are of such a nature as to create a clear and present danger that they will bring about the substantive evils that Congress has a right to prevent.

In other words, it is when, and only when, speech is a form of action, and when that action itself would be a criminal offence, that speech may be prohibited by law.

By the way, lest anyone regard the reference to “shouting fire in a theatre” as being merely a rhetorical flourish, I should point out that Justice Holmes was referring to a real-life event: the fatal stampede that occurred after someone shouted “fire” at a party in a crowded community hall in Calumet, Michigan on Christmas Eve, 1913. This disaster, which killed 73 people, was disturbingly similar to the mosque shooting in Quebec City, and it is correctly regarded to this day as the worst act of mass murder in Michigan's history.

I should point out as well that there are practical dangers in developing new categories of legislated impermissible speech, as opposed to legitimate bans on the kind of speech that constitutes criminal incitement.

In the 1970s and 1980s, Ernst Zundel was able to turn his serial prosecutions on charges of inciting hate to generate far more publicity than would otherwise have been possible for so marginal, and frankly, contemptible and laughable a character. Had he simply been ignored, it would have been better for the cause of openness in Canada. Indeed, he was able to use this publicity, this notoriety, to turn himself into a sort of media celebrity. Similarly, the existence of laws in Weimar Germany against the defamation of religions, including Judaism, did nothing to slow down the rise of the Nazis.

Seven years ago, this fact led me, along with other Conservative members of Parliament on the Canadian Parliamentary Coalition to Combat Antisemitism, to disagree with our Liberal colleagues, who wanted to expand the ...”

Jean Rioux (Liberal)

February 15th
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“...are proud to say that beginning in November 2016, the Canadian Armed Forces assumed the lead of the Coalition Role 2 medical facility in Northern Iraq. The team is made up of doctors, nurses, medical ...”

Jean Rioux (Liberal)

February 15th
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“...obal fight to defeat Daesh. Our military personnel continue to provide extraordinary support to the coalition.”

Cathy McLeod (Conservative)

February 14th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“Mr. Speaker, we are on the coal face, and certainly as far back as shortly after the state of emergency in British Columbia was...”

Alistair MacGregor (NDP)

February 14th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...We had the Canadian Human Rights Commission, the Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs, the Canadian Coalition for Genetic Fairness, the Canadian Association of Genetic Counsellors, the Canadian Medica...”

Jean Rioux (Liberal)

February 14th
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“...ccording to plan and on schedule.

The Canadian Armed Forces have also assumed the lead of the Coalition Role 2 medical facility in Northern Iraq. Approximately 50 military personnel are currently working at the facility with a mandate to provide medical and surgical care to support coalition forces. A total of 364 patients have been treated there so far. Members of the Canadian Armed Forces who have received care were treated for illnesses or injuries sustained outside the battlefield. We are very proud of the contribution of our medical teams.

We understand that Canadians want to know what our troops are doing and that is why our government has always been open and transparent about this mission. When we have information, we will be pleased to inform the opposition on the peacekeeping mission in Africa. A lot more information is needed. When decisions have been made and the requested information is available, the House will be notified.

Contrary to what my colleague opposite said, our government is working hard to keep Canadians informed in many different ways. There have been several technical briefings about the mission in recent months, one of which was broadcast on social media. A technical briefing was held on January 26 to provide updates on what Canadian troops are doing and what Iraqi security forces have accomplished in the operation to liberate Mosul. At another technical briefing, this one in November, officials discussed what our military men and women were doing in the campaign for Mosul. The minister and the chief of the defence staff also appeared before a parliamentary committee to talk about the mission.

The Canadian Armed Forces also made it possible for journalists to visit operations, as they did in November 2016, and we will continue to do so regularly. Journalists were able to observe first-hand how Canada is supporting the coalition.

We will continue to demonstrate transparency, but we will do so while constantly ta...”

Jean Rioux (Liberal)

February 14th
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“...ight to defeat Daesh.

Our military personnel continue to provide extraordinary support to the coalition and the Iraqi government to help dismantle and ultimately wipe out Daesh. We are extremely...”

Kelly McCauley (Conservative)

February 13th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...s metals and minerals. Alberta's metals and minerals sectors include natural gas, conventional oil, coal, minerals, and the oil sands. More specifically, Alberta's metal refinery and mineral sector is a foundational industry that allows for infrastructure development as well as energy and natural resource production in Alberta. It generated 28% of the province's total GDP in 2011, and employs more than 181,000 Albertans, creating employment opportunities that provide some of the highest earnings in the Alberta economy. Exports of metals and minerals currently face tariffs as high as 10%.

There is agriculture and agrifood. Alberta has more than 50,000 farms with crop and livestock production. They produce an abundance of world-class agriculture commodities. The agriculture and agrifood sector employs nearly 76,000 Albertans and contributes 2.5% to the GDP. Between 2010 and 2012, the exports of agriculture products to the EU suffered tariffs of over $35 million. That is $35 million that can be reinvested in the economy, jobs, and productivity improvement.

There are forest products. The forest products sector employs nearly 19,000 Albertans and represents a significant component of the economy. Forest product exports to the EU average $62 million and face up to a 10% tariff right now. These barriers would be eliminated under CETA.

There is advanced manufacturing. Alberta's advanced manufacturing industry employs more than 28,000 people. Between 2010 and 2012, Alberta's exports of advanced manufacturing products to the EU averaged a quarter of a billion dollars, which face tariffs as high as 22%. Industrial machinery, one of Alberta's key advanced manufacturing exports to the EU, faces tariffs of up to 8%.

Alberta is a major producer of chemicals and plastics. It employs 11,000 Albertans, an important part of exports to the EU, with exports averaging just under $100 million a year. These exports currently face tariffs of up to 6.5%. Again, these would be eliminated.

In addition to beef and agriculture products, CETA would also provide for increases in eligible trade for products with high sugar content. This stipulation would enable a company like PepsiCo, which has a large bottling facility in Edmonton's west end as well as other parts of Alberta, to continue to ship its products abroad and find new customers in new markets duty free. The stipulation for sugary products would also help local Edmonton start-ups, such as JACEK Chocolate Couture, which opened in Sherwood Park last year, and has now expanded into Canmore as well as downtown Edmonton. It will help it to hire new employees and reach a massive new market base.

CETA will open up markets for our burgeoning alcoholic beverage companies, which products are very well known to members of the Alberta Conservative caucus. There are over 50 breweries in Alberta, including favourites like Big Rock, Alley Kat, and Yellowhead. There are distilleries like Eau Claire Distillery, which makes gin and vodka from only local Alberta grains, and Park Distillery, based in Banff, that makes a vodka with glacial waters from the Rockies.

Closer to my home in Edmonton, there is Red Cup Distilling in Vegreville. I am wearing the button today supporting Vegreville. There is also the Big Rig Craft Distillery in Nisku, by the Edmonton airport, where people can get brum, which is basically rum made with sugar beets instead of sugar cane. I want to note it's called brum and not rum, so as not to run afoul with the rum lobby. If the all-powerful rum lobby is watching on CPAC today, please note I called it a brum and not a rum.

Edmonton is home to many head offices of world-class companies that are said to grow, compete, and win with access to this huge new market. PCL Construction has finished Rogers Place in downtown Edmonton, the finest hockey and event arena in the entire world. Stantec engineering, Booster Juice, and Weatherford are all based in Edmonton.

Edmonton is also renowned for its start-up culture, and many new enterprises will benefit from increased access to markets and added IP protection. TappCar is a ride-share company that has gained ground by working with municipal governments rather than circumventing local laws. Drizly is an app that arranges liquor deliveries. Should it expand to the Parliament Hill area, I am sure that sales will spike massively. My wife's personal favourite is Poppy Barley shoes, which has grown from a small, shared office space downtown to Edmonton's famous Whyte Avenue, with pop-ups in Toronto. (1345)

Edmonton also boasts having three of the top fifteen start-up companies in Canada, as named by Metabridge. The first is LoginRadius, which does customer analytics and serves over 1,000 businesses worldwide. There is Mover, a company that handles cloud file migration. The third company is Showbie, which helps teachers, schools, and students get connected across technology platforms.

Edmonton's bread-and-butter business, the oil and gas sector, stands to benefit tremendously from CETA by increasing market access to our oil and gas products. The Prime Minister wants to phase out oil and gas, but CETA represents a grand opportunity for Canada's job-creating and economic-driving industry to capitalize on new customers.

Supplier diversification is one of the European Union's top energy priorities. Currently Russia has 31% of the EU's oil and gas import market share, making it first. Canada has just 1% of the market share, placing us 26th. It is well known that Russian President Putin uses his country's oil and gas reserves as a weapon. Given that Russia supplies almost one-third of the EU's oil and gas, this position is strong. The EU needs to diversify, wants to diversify, and Alberta has plenty to offer. Not only will this create wealth and jobs in Alberta and the rest of Canada, it will help to free Europe from the bullying and blackmail of the Russian president and deprive him of his desperately needed revenues that he uses to threaten our democratic allies. The Right Honourable Stephen Harper famously told Putin to get out of Ukraine. CETA will help us get him out of Europe's oil and gas business.

As CETA reduces and eliminates tariffs across the board for oil and gas products, Canada and Alberta are well poised to fill the gap and become a crucial energy ally. This is an opportunity that we should not pass up, and frankly cannot pass up. The government may perhaps one day support energy east, and then we can ship Alberta oil to Quebec and New Brunswick for refining and stop sending jobs and billions of dollars to despotic regimes like Saudi Arabia.

Beyond energy, free trade helps foster greater co-operation between our democratic allies. We strongly support international trade initiatives that strengthen the bonds with friendly countries, increase economic productivity, and drive prosperity and job creation.

The world is full of uncertainty, and prior champions of trade and co-operation are retreating. This comes at an unfortunate time for Canada. Our country has the fastest-growing population in the OECD, and the west has the fastest-growing and youngest population in Canada. We have products. We have workers. We have the businesses. We will continue to have more people and more products over the next few years, and we need places to sell these goods.

CETA is an opportunity for us to secure access to the largest single market in the world at a time when other countries are retreating. Not only will this agreement help to give our job creators access to growing and demanding markets, it will give Canadians a head-start advantage over our competitors who are retreating from the global marketplace.

Even after all of these benefits I have discussed and talked about, CETA's detractors argue that the costs outweigh the benefits. They will say that CETA gives too much power to corporations and will allow them to sue governments for compensation if they change policies. The argument is callously thrown around as a holistic and negative point. It is just an assertion.

According to a summary in The Globe and Mail, CETA opens up a new process called the investment court system, or ICS. The ICS essentially acts as a permanent tribunal to handle complaints brought by businesses. Canada and the EU have hailed the ICS as a breakthrough offering a high level of protection for investors while fully preserving the right of governments to regulate and pursue legitimate public policy objectives, such as the protection of health, safety, and our environment.

It is perfectly legitimate for businesses that act in good faith and set up shop in new countries because of a trade agreement to be able to protect themselves from arbitrary changes by the host government. If governments agree to and sign a trade agreement, they agree to be bound by the provisions of that trade agreement with some exceptions. It is unreasonable to make governments the sole power holder in this arrangement.

If we expect companies to come to Canada, to do business in Canada, to create work for Canadians, and create wealth for our country, we must be able to guarantee them some modicum of stability and predictability, or at least grant them some recourse if a future government makes arbitrary changes that violate the provisions of that trade agreement. This is a two-way street, and businesses do not deserve less protection just because they are creating jobs, making investments, and earning profits.

At the same time, it is also important that governments are able to react to changing circumstances and create legislation that is good for Canadians in the event that exceptional circumstances arise. This is why CETA has built in provisions to protect both business and government.

I want to note here that Canadian investment in the EU was almost a quarter of a trillion dollars as of 2014. That is Canadian investment that will also be protected from the whims of a changing political landscape in Europe. (1350)

The Consider Canada City Alliance is a partnership with 12 of our largest cities. These cities represent 63% of Canada's GDP and 57% of our population. They work to increase investment in Canada and grow trade opportunities.

Our own highly respected Edmonton Economic Development Corporation is part of this coalition. Michael Darch, president of the CCCA states:

We see Canada moving toward creating t...”

Alistair MacGregor (NDP)

February 10th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“Mr. Speaker, in November last year, the BC Child and Youth Advocacy Coalition released its B.C. child poverty report, which shows the growing income inequality among B....”

Phil McColeman (Conservative)

February 9th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...t important is the hard work of so many Brantford residents to make this happen. To the Brant Tree Coalition founder, Jim Berhalter, and Chuck Beach and his team, I give a huge shout out and thanks.<...”

Sheila Malcolmson (NDP)

February 9th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...use the parties are elected together and co-operate together. There are shifts, of course, in those coalitions over time.

No one would describe Norway as an unstable democracy. It elects more wo...”

David de Burgh Graham (Liberal)

February 9th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...centrist government. It has a government that alternates between a left-wing party and a right-wing coalition, with no centrist party ever doing well. Finland and Israel use very similar pure proporti...”

Carol Hughes (NDP)

February 8th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...k I hosted an event in support of the national initiative for eating disorders. This not-for-profit coalition works to increase awareness and education for the chronic situation facing sufferers of ea...”

Tracey Ramsey (NDP)

February 8th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...e ramifications this may have on Canada's maritime industry. The Canadian Maritime and Supply Chain Coalition, which includes the Seafarers' International Union of Canada and the International Longsho...”

Thomas Mulcair (NDP)

February 8th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...nding everyone that the tragedy of the loss of jobs in Grande Cache has to do with the closing of a coal mine, first and foremost. However, it is another example that in the energy sector, because tha...”

Niki Ashton (NDP)

February 8th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...Conservatives have failed to embrace a definition of energy which goes beyond oil, natural gas, and coal. These hardships are also a direct result of successive governments that have failed to diversify not just our energy economy but our resource-based economy more broadly.

I am from a mining town and we know what a boom and bust economy means for us. Our region also knows the importance of value-added jobs. Right now we are on the verge of losing hundreds of value-added jobs, particularly in the mining industry in our part of the country. People in Flin Flon and Thompson are very concerned, afraid, worried, and angry. Some months ago people in The Pas also faced insecurity. While there has been an interim solution, people continue to be concerned about the future of their resource sector, namely forestry.

In all of these cases what has been clear is that the federal government has been nowhere to be found to stand up for Canadian workers in our communities, much like in communities in Alberta and elsewhere. In fact, in our north, the federal government is nowhere to be found, not just in the communities I mentioned but also when it comes to Churchill, the Port of Churchill, or infrastructure jobs that were also committed to our communities.

Tonight we are talking about a situation that is increasingly impacting workers across the country. The reality is that the jobs situation in Canada is worsening. Over the last number of years, and it was certainly the case this past year, we have been creating more part-time, unstable work. Over the last year, full-time jobs only grew by 0.5%. This is related to job losses in the oil sector. More and more Canadians are struggling in precarious work. Many of them are young people.

That is why less than a year ago we launched a tour on the rise of precarious work in the millennial generation. We took our tour to Alberta. We went to Edmonton and Calgary. We heard heartbreaking stories about the challenges that young people were facing in these communities in difficult times.

I remember in Calgary we heard from an MLA, a minister in the government. She talked about how Calgary was often seen as a place of hope for many young Canadians and now even if one was from Alberta, that individual could barely make it by.

In Edmonton we heard from a young woman, a freelance journalist, who talked about the economic insecurity that she faced and how recently one of her bosses was told that if she wanted to find greater economic security, she should just get married.

The reality is that there is a way forward. That is by standing up for value-added jobs, standing up to companies that want to rip and ship our resources, standing up for a just transition.

We have heard tonight that research shows that an investment of $1 million in coal creates seven jobs. That same investment of $1 million creates 14 jobs in the solar industry an...”

John Barlow (Conservative)

February 8th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...of the most diversified economies in all of Canada. To talk about Alberta, we should talk about our coal industry, our forestry sector, our agriculture sector. There is a reason that everybody knows a...”

Borys Wrzesnewskyj (Liberal)

February 7th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...en destroyed and in whose libraries and schools history began with the 1917 Bolshevik revolution; a coal mining and heavily industrialized region that was also among the Soviet Union's most ecological...”

Robert Kitchen (Conservative)

February 3rd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...he economy.

The announcement of a Liberal carbon tax, as well as the planned phase-out of the coal-fired electricity, has also devastated my constituents at a time when jobs are already scarce. At this point in time, my constituents are looking for their government to create jobs and get them back to work.

Despite the Liberals' lack of action on that front, I am pleased that CETA will provide an opportunity for employment through the opening of markets for several industries, namely agriculture.

Once CETA comes into force, 98% of all tariffs between Canada and the EU will immediately be eliminated. The tariff exemption on goods will result in over $1.4 billion being added to Canada's merchandise exports to the EU by 2022. It is hoped that the removal of tariffs and barriers to trade will create the jobs my constituents so badly need and that it would improve productivity and promote growth.

My riding contains hundreds of farms. The agricultural industry is the backbone of my constituency. I am greatly supportive of any trade deal that would bolster that industry. Farmers feed Canada and the world and so anything that can be done to increase the access of these farmers to international markets should be done. Through CETA, these producers will have an additional 500 million consumers to which they can market their agricultural and agrifood products.

For agricultural and agrifood products, specifically, almost 94% of the EU tariff lines on Canadians goods will be duty-free once CETA enters into force. As the tariff phase-outs are completed, this will rise to 95% of products, approximately seven years after the agreement comes into force.

This is great news for Saskatchewan producers. From 2013 to 2015, 80% of principal merchandise exports from Saskatchewan to the EU were from the agriculture and agrifood industry, amounting to $935.4 million. With the current EU tariff, tariffs on products such as durum wheat are as high as 148 euros per tonne. Once CETA comes into force, tariffs such as this would be eliminated completely.

Again, this will create a trickle-down effect, but a positive one. Agricultural producers will not only have access to a large and mature market, but they will also save money when it comes to the elimination of tariffs on their exports. This will mean they will be able to hire more employees, creating jobs, while also gaining access to the world's largest market. This is exactly what Saskatchewan and, in particular, my constituents need at this time. (1045)

I am also pleased that CETA will provide Canadian producers with preferential access to markets. As this is the first comprehensive trade deal between the EU and any other country, Saskatchewan farmers and ranchers will be in a position to market their products to the largest economy in the world, products such as beef, pork, and bison. I know my constituents are supportive of any initiative that opens up markets for trade. I hope the government can recognize just how important it is to have this happen as soon as possible.

A joint Canada-EU study that supported the launch of negotiations concluded that a trade agreement with the EU could bring a 20% boost in bilateral trade, and a $12 billion annual increase to Canada's economy. This is the economic equivalent of adding $1,000 to the income of the average Canadian family, or almost 80,000 new jobs to the Canadian economy. At a time when jobs are scarce in my constituency, this added revenue will make a huge difference in the lives of those who are struggling to find work. By opening new markets, jobs are both directly and indirectly created, something that is badly needed in my riding.

The implementation of CETA will also affect a number of other industries, though more indirectly. For example, when a farmer needs to get his grain to market, he has to hire someone to transport that product. This is a job that might otherwise not exist, and so it is essentially job creation. Farmers also need to utilize services of maintenance workers for their heavy machinery and equipment. Again, this is job creation. At a time when my riding is in dire need of jobs, CETA allows easier market access to producers, which allows producers to hire more people, especially in the services industry, and benefits the economy of Saskatchewan overall.

While the focus of my speech has so far been mainly on agriculture, the services industry I just mentioned will also benefit from CETA coming into force. The services sector is a key contributor to Saskatchewan's economy, accounting for 57% of the province's total GDP, and employing more than 394,000 Saskatchewan residents in 2015. With preferential access and greater transparency in the EU services market, there will be more secure and predictable market access in the areas of interest to Saskatchewan, such as construction services, as well as research and development services.

Currently, Saskatchewan is recognized as a world leader in agricultural biotechnology and life sciences, with cutting edge research centres spawning high-tech industries. An example of this is the Canadian Light Source synchrotron and Innovation Place research parks.

Through CETA, Saskatchewan and Canada will have preferential access, as well as greater transparency, in the EU services market, something that can only stand to benefit our research and development sector.

Saskatchewan is a vast province. In addition to agricultural exports of $15.1 billion in 2015, the province is gaining worldwide attention for its wealth of mineral and energy resources. Saskatchewan is Canada's second largest oil producing province, and the third largest natural gas producing province, making the oil and gas industry one of the largest contributors to the provincial economy, with sales of $15.9 billion in 2014. Despite the downturn in oil and gas prices, the industry remains integral to the economic well-being of the province.

For those who may not be aware, Saskatchewan is also a world leader in carbon capture and storage, with expertise in enhanced oil recovery. SaskPower, the province's power utility, has undertaken one of the world's largest carbon capture and storage projects at the Boundary Dam power station, located in my hometown of Estevan. This project is one of the first to develop and demonstrate carbon dioxide capture at a coal-fired power generation plant on a commercial scale, in part, because of the previous Conservati...”

Robert Kitchen (Conservative)

February 3rd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...tion.

I tell everyone in my riding that our province is an export province. It exports wheat, coal, gas, and potash. Many people have moved to other countries, but some have come back to the rid...”

Marilyn Gladu (Conservative)

February 2nd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...arming. Sixty per cent of the footprint is the U.S., India, China, and Europe. China is building 24 coal plants. The U.S. has just said that it is reintroducing coal. India just built the biggest coal plant on the planet. If we are really serious about helping the planet, we should leverage Cana...”

Sonia Sidhu (Liberal)

February 2nd
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...ognize them:

The Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs; the World Sikh Organization of Canada; Coalition for Progressive Canadian Muslim Organizations; Canada India Foundation; Canadian Rabbinic ...”

Kim Rudd (Liberal)

February 2nd
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“...onomy, and create good middle-class jobs.

These actions include accelerating the phase-out of coal, developing a clean fuel standard, taking action on short-lived climate pollutants, and yes, pu...”

Jenny Kwan (NDP)

February 1st
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...to go out and try to save lives. That is what they are faced with. Imagine the stress.

The BC Coalition of Nursing Associations hosted an emergency forum on the nursing response to the opioid cr...”

Cathy McLeod (Conservative)

February 1st
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...zes that we have a real issue, especially my colleagues from British Columbia who are really at the coal face of this issue.

We just had a motion that would actually facilitate the vast majority...”

Cathy McLeod (Conservative)

January 31st
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“Mr. Speaker, I note that my colleague is from British Columbia, which is at the coalface of this crisis.

Back in April, British Columbia called a public state of emergency. Q...”

Colin Carrie (Conservative)

January 31st
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...sociation of Occupational Therapists, and the more than 50 organization members of the quality care coalition.

It is by working hard with organizations and bringing awareness to the need for pal...”

Marilyn Gladu (Conservative)

January 31st
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...iety, the Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists, more than 50 organization members of the Coalition for Quality Care, and many faith organizations, including the Canadian Conference of Catho...”

Sheila Malcolmson (NDP)

January 30th
Hansard Link

Routine Proceedings

“... commercial anchorages, each to house 300-metre-long vessels that are going to be exporting Wyoming coal to China, where it will be burned in power plants. Petitioners point out that this is bad for c...”

Rhéal Fortin (Bloc Québécois)

December 14th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...continue to speak out against government measures that are bad for Quebec. This government deserves coal in its stocking this Christmas.

All the same, my colleagues and I wish all Quebeckers and...”

Kerry Diotte (Conservative)

December 14th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...es, not pipe dreams; who want action, not broken promises. They deserve more than a Liberal lump of coal.

That said, I wish my constituents and all members of this House a very merry Christmas a...”

Stéphane Dion (Liberal)

December 14th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“....

Obviously, we have denounced those actions repeatedly, and we are not part of the the Saudi coalition. We want Saudi Arabia to honour its international obligations.”

Tracey Ramsey (NDP)

December 13th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...g process. The assessment makes really no mention of the impact of increased imports and exports of coal. We would like to get some more information on this, also at the committee level.

Unfortu...”

Jim Eglinski (Conservative)

December 13th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...n annually to Ukraine. Some of the top exports from western Canada included frozen hake, bituminous coal, reservoir tanks and similar containers, parts of boring or sinking machines for drilling, air compressors and other similar equipment, seeders and planters, and that which I think is most important, frozen pork. Why do I think frozen pork is so important? It is a staple food that Ukrainians like. I grew up with pork, probably more so than beef. On any given day, if you offer me a steak or a barbecued pork chop, I will leave the steak and take the pork. I see my heritage must still be with me.

Upon entry into force of the agreement, Ukraine will immediately eliminate tariffs on 75% of the tariff lines for industrial products, with a further 24.8% to become duty-free over seven years, making it 100% duty free in seven years.

According to Canadian government officials, the total back-and-forth trade between Canada and Ukraine averaged $350 million between 2011 and 2013, and slowed drastically during 2014, as Ukraine was dealing with a political upheaval and armed conflict in southern and eastern parts of the country.

The provisions of the agreement on free trade between Ukraine and Canada provide the deepening of trade and economic co-operation, including trade in industrial and agricultural goods, intellectual property protection, and regulation of public procurement.

The free trade agreement does not impact Canada's ability to maintain its existing supply management policy, as Canadian over-quota tariffs for supply management goods, being dairy, poultry and eggs, are excluded from the tariff concessions. (1320)

Total bilateral merchandise trade between Canada and the Ukraine averaged $289 million between 2011 and 2015. In 2015, it expanded by almost 20% as a result of the implementation of this trade.

Canada's GDP will increase by $29.2 million under CUFTA and the Ukraine's GDP will expand by $18.6 million.

As a result of this agreement, Canada's exports to the Ukraine will increase by $41.2 million. Canada's export gains will be broad-based, with exports of pork, machinery and equipment, transport equipment, other manufactured products, motor vehicles, parts, as well as chemical products leading the way.

The Ukrainian market offers many opportunities for Canadians, Canadian businesses, and investors in areas such as aerospace, agricultural equipment, information and communication technology, agriculture and agrifood, fish and seafood, and mining equipment.

The agriculture and agrifood sector employed over 530,000 people in 2014 in Canada and accounted for close to 3% of Canada's GDP. Canada is the world's fifth largest exporter of agriculture and agrifood products. Our agriculture exports to the Ukraine averaged almost $30 million between 2011 and 2013 each year.

The majority of Ukrainians who came to Canada in the late 1800s and early 1900s settled in western Canada and became farmers. They farmed the area and opened up the land. They homesteaded. It was not only Ukrainians. Germans, Italians, Dutch, and many others helped to open up Canada and make it such a prosperous agricultural nation.

Today, there are approximately 1.3 million Ukrainian descendants, the second largest population of Ukrainians in the world other than Ukraine itself. Many members said in the House that we would need to be friends but we are almost closer than friends in a lot of cases. We are family. When we talk about 1.3 million Canadians with ties to the Ukraine, we are talking families.

In 2015 alone, bilateral trade between Canada and Ukraine increased 14%. That shows that we have been growing every year since this agreement was first looked at.

Canadian exports include pharmaceuticals, fish and seafood, and coking coal. It is important to know that we both export and import coal.

It is also important to note that the Canada-Ukraine free trade agreement will generate ...”

Tom Kmiec (Conservative)

December 13th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... to go over some of those top exports from western Canada, where I am from: frozen hake, bituminous coal, reservoir tanks and similar containers, parts of boring or sinking machinery, air compressors ...”

Brian Masse (NDP)

December 13th
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“...ents, the current government and previous governments have used auto as basically the canary in the coal mine for many other industries.

I would point to the most recent agreement, the TPP, wher...”

Sheila Malcolmson (NDP)

December 12th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...gshore and Warehouse Union of Canada. He is also co-chair of the Canadian Maritime and Supply Chain Coalition.

I have heard the same concerns echoed by Graeme Johnston, the president of the BC F...”

John Barlow (Conservative)

December 12th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...me Minister's goal, While neglecting good-paying jobs like mining of coal; The surplus we left them was gone in a flash, ...”

Jonathan Wilkinson (Liberal)

December 12th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...n Friday. We have moved forward with a number of key environmental initiatives relating to methane, coal, hydrofluorocarbons, and the pricing of carbon pollution.

That is real change. That is wh...”

Rachel Blaney (NDP)

December 12th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...brings us back to my first point on pharmacare. According to Natalie Mehra, from the Ontario Health Coalition, the ability for investors to sue the government puts much more significant risk on the fe...”

Robert Kitchen (Conservative)

December 9th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, the Liberal announcement to expedite the phasing-out of coal-powered electricity has created panic in my riding. For over 10,000 residents, mainly in Corona...”

Garnett Genuis (Conservative)

December 8th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...tween Canada and Taiwan, the main exports from Canada to Taiwan include mineral oil, asphalt, wood, coal, nickel, meat, railway vehicles, and metal ore. Canada is Taiwan's 24th largest trading partner...”

Elizabeth May (Green Party)

December 7th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, representatives of the Coalition des citoyens de Lac-Mégantic are here in Ottawa today.

In 2013, the member for Papi...”

Peter Julian (NDP)

December 7th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...the member for Essex as a very strong member of Parliament who is actually a bit of a canary in the coal mine saying to the Liberal government it should not be ramming through this bill, they should b...”

Alexandra Mendès (Liberal)

December 6th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“... December 6, it is time to reflect on what progress has been made since. I want to mention here the Coalition for Gun Control, an organization that focuses on preventing gun-related crime.

With ...”

Pierre Nantel (NDP)

December 5th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...

As citizens, we must demand from all our elected officials an unwavering commitment within a coalition to make our region a champion. At a time when 37% of its young people are living under the poverty line, Longueuil badly needs the long-term jobs that will come with such a system of innovation.

It is with the people’s enthusiasm and support that I pledge to do everything in my power as an MP to build this coalition of elected officials so we can all work together tirelessly to bring these major forward-l...”

Robert Kitchen (Conservative)

December 5th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...try. We need them to show confidence in innovation and recognize the value of carbon capture to the coal and power industry. We need it to come now.

For these reasons, I cannot support this budg...”

Peter Van Loan (Conservative)

December 1st
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...identically followed that of the Communist Party in the Soviet Union. It started with a broad-based coalition that was a revolution against a government that was generally not supported by the people....”

Brad Trost (Conservative)

December 1st
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...The people of Saskatchewan want the Liberal government to end its war on Canadian oil, gas, and coal and instead focus on delivering clean air and clean water.”

Serge Cormier (Liberal)

December 1st
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“... award by the Conseil économique du Nouveau-Brunswick.

The business was founded in 1943 by a coalition of co-operatives that wanted to build a cold storage facility in Lamèque in order to proc...”

Sheri Benson (NDP)

November 30th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...no stranger to poverty, and there is a very high cost to poverty. In Saskatchewan, Poverty Costs, a coalition of community-based organizations, calculated that the economic cost of poverty in Saskatch...”

Arnold Viersen (Conservative)

November 29th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“... with an empty stocking, and on top of that, the Liberals will not even leave Canada with a lump of coal, because they are phasing that out too.

Rural Canadians are not on St. Nick's naughty lis...”

Tracey Ramsey (NDP)

November 29th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, last Friday, the U.S. Lumber Coalition filed a petition triggering what could be the start of yet another softwood lumber war, an...”

Brigitte Sansoucy (NDP)

November 29th
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“...nthe has been in print since 1853. It is the oldest French newspaper in America and a member of the Coalition pour la pérennité de la presse d'information au Québec, which advocates on behalf of print newspapers. Most major newspapers in Quebec and Canada have agreed to ask for concrete programs to help them transition to the digital platform.

This Quebec print media coalition is asking the federal government to act. They want meaningful financial assistance, transitional support, financial support to help them gradually transition to digital without having to choose between bankruptcy and cutting thousands of jobs just to survive. They are acutely aware of the challenges that the digital shift poses every day, but they are also grappling with lower ad revenues.

During one of her consultations, the minister had this to say about print media:

I realize that major changes are affecting various media and the entire entertainment industry. As I have said many times, everything is on the table. I am ready to talk about the levers available to the federal government to support and promote those industries.

I wonder what they are waiting for. When will they do something to help?

The coalition asked, among other things, for a program or a tax credit to cover some of the print media'...”

Linda Duncan (NDP)

November 28th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...a, no jurisdiction has regulated the single largest source of mercury in North America, and that is coal-fired mercury. Lamps were included in the CCME list, but after coal-fired power and cement. It is very pleasing that the member opposite has chosen to finally seek...”

Robert Kitchen (Conservative)

November 28th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... words. Being from Saskatchewan, I know she understands what the Liberal government has done to the coal industry. It has created the potential for huge job losses in a town called Coronach, where the...”

Sheila Malcolmson (NDP)

November 25th
Hansard Link

Routine Proceedings

“...d tourism, and an overall concern that the anchorages are meant to facilitate the export of thermal coal from Wyoming to China and will have no benefit for people in the community. It is all downside ...”

Karen Vecchio (Conservative)

November 25th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ed in budget 2015, is necessary. Key stakeholders are onside with Bill C-25, including the Canadian Coalition for Good Governance and the Canadian Board Diversity Council.

I thank the Minister o...”

Linda Duncan (NDP)

November 24th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... able to survive. They need that connectivity.

I am charged by the fact that the Green Budget Coalition is asking for a green infrastructure definition that includes the protection of green area...”

Gary Anandasangaree (Liberal)

November 24th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...at predate me but are all nonetheless essential players, including the Save the Rouge Valley System coalition.

Most of the local politicians in Scarborough over the years have played a very impo...”

Tracey Ramsey (NDP)

November 24th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, tomorrow the U.S. Lumber Coalition is expected to file a formal complaint against Canadian producers. This will cause a major...”

François Choquette (NDP)

November 24th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ew national parks and marine protected areas.

If the recommendations of the 2017 Green Budget Coalition were accepted, we would have six national parks established by 2020, if memory serves. That would enable us to reach our targets, or at least come close.

Right now, the Liberals need to read the recommendations of the 2017 Green Budget Coalition. They contain many good ideas for achieving our conservation goals. Unfortunately, we are ...”

François Choquette (NDP)

November 24th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...conservation.

On the other hand, I am wondering where my colleague stands on the Green Budget Coalition’s recommendations, which include establishing at least six new national parks and three ...”

François Choquette (NDP)

November 24th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...s and 10% of marine areas by 2020. We are a long way from that.

In addition, the Green Budget Coalition stated that the federal government should establish six new parks, and nothing has been do...”

François Choquette (NDP)

November 24th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...o much more than just improve the Rouge Park in order to achieve the objectives of the Green Budget Coalition, which is calling for the creation of six new parks? What does my colleague think of this?...”

Michelle Rempel (Conservative)

November 22nd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...environmental review process six times to Sunday but not saying how or when. It is musing about the coal ban and changing the rules.

When we change the rules without consultation and without und...”

Gerry Ritz (Conservative)

November 22nd
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...n greater risk by making yet another arbitrary decision to save the world by shutting down Canada's coal-fired plants in an effort to rid the world of a little bit of carbon.

Where is the cost-benefit analysis? Where are the consultations with provinces, stakeholders, and individual Canadians? The Liberal seem to have forgotten that in the first five months of 2016, China brought in 25 new coal-fired plants with plans for many more.

When it comes to implementing trade agreements tha...”

Yasmin Ratansi (Liberal)

November 22nd
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...day to advocate on behalf of the National Initiative for Eating Disorders. NIED is a not-for-profit coalition of families whose loved ones suffer from eating disorders. They wish to bring about positi...”

Sheila Malcolmson (NDP)

November 22nd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...greements that risk increasing drug costs for the provinces.

According to the Canadian Health Coalition, the delayed arrival of cheaper generics will increase the cost of prescription drugs for ...”

Sheila Malcolmson (NDP)

November 22nd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...n Generic Pharmaceutical Association, the Canadian Federation of Nurses Unions, the Canadian Health Coalition, and in fact, Health Canada itself. They all say that the direction of prescription drug c...”

Chandra Arya (Liberal)

November 22nd
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...ed their support for Bill C-305: the Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs, World Sikh Organization, Coalition of Progressive Muslim Organizations, Canada India Foundation, Canadian Rabbinic Caucus, As...”

David de Burgh Graham (Liberal)

November 22nd
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...this. We have heard from the Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs, the World Sikh Organization, the Coalition of Progressive Canadian Muslim Organizations, the Canada-Indian Foundation, the Canadian R...”

Chrystia Freeland (Liberal)

November 21st
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ment in existence. In fact, this agreement has the support of all socialist parties in a government coalition.

I would also like to point out that in terms of investment our government has made ...”

Marwan Tabbara (Liberal)

November 21st
Hansard Link

Routine Proceedings

“...resent a petition from the Waterloo-Wellington, Ontario, branch of the Ethiopian-Canadian Community Coalition for Social Justice and Human Rights in Ethiopia.

The petition contains hundreds of s...”

Ed Fast (Conservative)

November 21st
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...nomic impact analysis on that. I suspect that the announcement the government made about abandoning coal-fired electricity had no economic impact analysis. I suspect that the Brexit impact on this tra...”

John Barlow (Conservative)

November 21st
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... country, the home of Alberta beef, some of the best malting barley in the world, and metallurgical coal. The stakeholders in my riding are very excited about the opportunity to see the new markets th...”

Michelle Rempel (Conservative)

November 18th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ressive social policy and individual rights and responsibilities....The goal of building a national coalition of people who share these beliefs...The goal of developing this coalition, embracing our differences and respecting our traditions, yet honouring a concept of Canad...”

Gord Johns (NDP)

November 18th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...ssed to have compassionate organizations such as the Port Alberni Shelter Society, the Comox Valley Coalition to End Homelessness, Dawn to Dawn, and the Oceanside Task Force on Homelessness.

The...”

Deborah Schulte (Liberal)

November 18th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“....

The Canadian Ethnocultural Council, the CEC, the only not-for-profit, non-partisan national coalition of ethnocultural organizations, of which the NCIC is a proud member, whose objectives inte...”

Rachel Blaney (NDP)

November 18th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...ct, many Italian immigrants came to the Comox Valley in the 20th century to work principally in the coal mines. Often fleeing poverty from distant parts of the world, they came to our region looking f...”

Kevin Sorenson (Conservative)

November 17th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...search and development on their own products.

Fifteen industry members of the Abuse Deterrent Coalition wrote to Canada's Minister of Health in support of abuse-deterrent and tamper-resistance f...”

Jonathan Wilkinson (Liberal)

November 17th
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“...a's biggest companies are on board as active members of the international Carbon Pricing Leadership Coalition, including companies like Cenovus, Teck Resources, and Suncor. Indeed, the president and C...”

James Bezan (Conservative)

November 16th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...cally fought al-Qaeda, alongside our NATO allies. Today, our troops are battling ISIS in a U.S.-led coalition in Iraq. Africa is full of al-Qaeda and ISIS terrorists, but the Liberals want our troops ...”

Kelly McCauley (Conservative)

November 16th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...ng to needs and market conditions. Most people would still withdraw something.

When we have a coalition of CARP, the C.D. Howe Institute, and the readers of the Toronto Star on the same side of ...”

Harjit S. Sajjan (Liberal)

November 15th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...engagement to protect themselves. In many cases, they need to protect not only themselves but their coalition partners and civilians. This is imperative. They have a duty to do so. I am proud of the w...”

Louis Plamondon (Bloc Québécois)

November 15th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...tructure, including interprovincial transmission lines that it claims will reduce our dependence on coal.

That description seems to have been written with Muskrat Falls in mind, a project that h...”

Larry Bagnell (Liberal)

November 14th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...Then there is affordable housing and the national housing plan. I have been on the anti-poverty coalition for years. We hope that the infrastructure bank will work; I will talk about that a bit la...”

Don Davies (NDP)

November 2nd
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“...ce the Canada Health Act. After all, in his previous job as vice-president of the National Citizens Coalition, Stephen Harper went on record saying, “It’s past time the feds scrapped the Canada He...”

Tom Kmiec (Conservative)

November 1st
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...op in supply. The electricity generation stations are still there; they have not gone anywhere. The coal-powered plants are still there; they have not gone anywhere.

Another statistic I want to ...”

Elizabeth May (Green Party)

November 1st
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...the LNG industry in British Columbia is projected to come from, it has the same carbon footprint as coal. Seeing a provision in the legislation that would continue this well into the future is a concern. That should come to an end much sooner.

We also were promised a lot of spending on infrastructure but when we look at the actual budget figures, only one-tenth of what is promised on infrastructure will occur before the next election. I really am keen to hear what our finance minister is about to announce later today. If we are trying to stimulate the economy through investments in infrastructure, then we really have to make those investments in infrastructure and we have to do it sooner rather than later. We have only one chance of the money flowing to things like public transit, which we urgently need.

There is reference in the budget to a small amount of money over a two-year period for examining what we need to improve Canada's east-west electricity grid. We need that urgently. Canada is a big country and we tend to have far too many interprovincial barriers. We are familiar with talking about interprovincial barriers to trade but we do not think so much about the interprovincial barriers to electricity. Why is it that provinces struggling to go off coal are having trouble buying renewable energy from the province next door? We really do need to invest in what is a real nation building project. It would create jobs and the fastest root to de-carbonizing our electricity grid is to improve access across provincial boundaries.

We can look at the absurdity right now of what is going on in Newfoundland with respect to Muskrat Falls. Nalcor is building Muskrat Falls, and CEO Stan Marshall has already referred to Muskrat Falls as a boondoggle that should never have been built. Newfoundland will be coming cap in hand to the federal treasury to look for money to bail out that project but it will find that it is throwing good money after bad. Nova Scotia says it cannot shut down coal until it gets an underwater cable all the way from Muskrat Falls.

Hydro-Québec sits righ...”

Marc Garneau (Liberal)

October 27th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...in Iraq to defeat Daesh. Our training, advise, and assist role is an extremely important one to the coalition, as well as the other roles we are fulfilling.

We are doing our job at the moment within the coalition. It is important that we do not jeopardize the operational security of our forces, conside...”

Marc Garneau (Liberal)

October 27th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...tion of a medical facility in Iraq.

We are an important and well-respected contributor to the coalition. We are doing our job. We must ensure, however, that we do not jeopardize the operational ...”

John McKay (Liberal)

October 26th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, as you know, the Canadian Forces are engaged in an anti-ISIL coalition. There was a meeting in Europe this week and we are proud partners in that coalition. At this time, the coalition is pursuing its mandate to advise, to assist, and to train and it has not gone beyond that...”

John McKay (Liberal)

October 26th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...se, an assist, and training mission. We are an important and committed partner in the international coalition against Daesh. We will assess the needs of the coalition as time goes on, but under this current mandate, our mission is focused in Iraq.”

John McKay (Liberal)

October 26th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, we are currently focused on the train, assist, and advise mission in Iraq with our coalition partners. We are not taking military operations in any place else, and we are not about to...”

Pam Damoff (Liberal)

October 26th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...e Burlington cycling advisory committee, Halton Regional Police Service, and Share the Road Cycling Coalition.

People are concerned about being able to ride safely. Over the years, sadly, we hav...”

Navdeep Bains (Liberal)

October 26th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...he House, and those who were part of the consultation process. Just to highlight that, the Canadian Coalition for Good Governance, for example, is very supportive and said when these amendments are en...”

Luc Berthold (Conservative)

October 26th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...r the entire board.

About 10 years ago, Canadian shareholders began working with the Canadian Coalition for Good Governance to call on Canadian businesses to voluntarily adopt a majority voting policy, which means that when a board member gets less than the majority of votes, he or she must step down from the board of directors, which must accept the resignation, unless there are exceptional circumstances.

The coalition's efforts are definitely starting to pay off, given that, over the past few years, more an...”

John Barlow (Conservative)

October 25th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...elcome Glen Motz to our team. Here are some numbers I want to put out there: Conservatives, 70; the coalition for a carbon tax, 26.”

Mark Strahl (Conservative)

October 25th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...ind it interesting that the member referred to “we” did not roll back the TFSAs. The carbon tax coalition lives on. They are in it together.

The NDP and the Liberals tried to paint the TFSA ...”

Robert Oliphant (Liberal)

October 25th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...restigious award from the American Society of Human Genetics. Bev is also the chair of the Canadian Coalition for Genetic Fairness. They have worked together as health groups, patient organizations, a...”

Peter Kent (Conservative)

October 24th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...iscrimination and segregation in Muslim-run UN camps.

German Chancellor Merkel has called for coalition forces to create a safe zone for Yazidis.

What about Canada? When will the Liberals ...”

Sheila Malcolmson (NDP)

October 21st
Hansard Link

Routine Proceedings

“... bulk anchorages off the coastline of Gabriola Island.

They are intended to transport Wyoming coal to China, exacerbating climate change. The anchorages themselves have oil spill risks. The anch...”

Michelle Rempel (Conservative)

October 20th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“... fight to contain ISIS did not help the Yazidi cause, given that it is widely acknowledged that the coalition air strikes have greatly aided Iraqi ground forces in taking back key ISIS strongholds. Th...”

Hélène Laverdière (NDP)

October 20th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...oo many such crimes.

Everyone knows we sell weapons to Saudi Arabia, and apparently the Saudi coalition is committing crimes against humanity in Yemen too.

I do not have enough time left t...”

Peter Kent (Conservative)

October 20th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...Canada is not in a position to consider such action. More importantly, we must hope that the allied coalition's Operation Inherent Resolve, now focused on liberating Mosul, will result in the effective rescue of many Yazidi prisoners. However, a rescue dimension could and should also apply to the many thousands of individually internally displaced Yazidi people, so-called IDPs, who are in the Kurdish autonomous region of Iraq. (1140)

We know that more than 500,000 Iraqi Yazidis were driven from Sinjar and other communities, many finding sanctuary of a sort in Iraq's Kurdish autonomous region. However, these internally displaced persons, or IDPs, are not recognized or certified by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees as refugees.

We heard powerful first-hand testimony from a strong, articulate, young survivor of the genocide and brutalization, Nadia Murad, at a special sitting of the House Standing Committee on Citizenship and Immigration in July, that these displaced Yazidis, along with other persecuted minorities in Iraq, are caught in a terrible limbo. They often face discrimination, less deadly than from Daesh, but discrimination nonetheless, when they register at UN camps, where they are segregated from the others for their own protection.

Outside the camps, the Kurdish sub-sovereign government tries to provide humanitarian food and health services, but there is precious little funding for these IDPs from the Government of Iraq, which should be doing much more. The situation is somewhat better, but only somewhat better, for thousands of Yazidis who have made their way to relative safety in Turkey. However, we were saddened and again frustrated to learn that, while the UN High Commissioner for Refugees tells us that it has submitted Yazidi women from Iraq for resettlement from Turkey, it is for Canada to say if the government is considering taking Iraqi Yazidis from Turkey as part of our refugee program. Unfortunately, the Liberal government has not stepped up.

We can be encouraged by the significant and continuing battlefield successes of the allied coalition against the dark, murderous forces of Daesh, but the liberation of cities and towns previo...”

Pam Goldsmith-Jones (Liberal)

October 20th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“... major turning point in the fight against Daesh. The Iraqi security forces, supported by the global coalition against Daesh, are currently approaching Mosul, the self-proclaimed capital of Daesh in Iraq and its last stronghold in that country.

Canada has been a member of the coalition supporting Iraq since 2014. The training and expertise that we provide to the Iraqi forces...”

Hélène Laverdière (NDP)

October 20th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“... questions. First, if that applies to ISIS, should we also investigate the actions of the Saudi-led coalition in Yemen and those of Bashar al-Assad?

Second, the search for justice requires on-th...”

Pam Goldsmith-Jones (Liberal)

October 20th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“Mr. Speaker, it is important to recognize that Canada is participating in a coalition of partners, and we are there to play our part. Absolutely, with regard to the investigati...”

Ali Ehsassi (Liberal)

October 20th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“... terms of our intake of Syrian refugees and also drastically increased our contributions toward the coalition to defeat Daesh. In that same vein, our response to the Yazidi genocide, while ever-evolving, demonstrates a similar commitment to responsible, engaged, robust, and multifaceted policy solutions.

Allow me to be clear. Our government unequivocally stands by the Yazidis. Like my colleague opposite, I had the chance to hear some of the horrifying and chilling testimony of Yazidi refugees over the summer, and I understand the urgency to act. In that vein, while I fully respect the motion before us today, it gets ahead of the process.

Dialogue with the appropriate partners, as well as an assessment of the situation in regions where Yazidis and other victims of Daesh are located, must take place to develop a responsible plan. This is not feasible within the time frame contained within the motion. The timeline proposed in the motion demands expedient processing of Yazidis specifically, a worthy goal but one that is operationally unrealistic and dangerous due to the complex security situation on the ground.

As the member opposite is aware, many of the most vulnerable Yazidis live in highly dangerous and inaccessible regions. Fully supporting these vulnerable populations, as such, will therefore require carefully considered legislation, not a rushed and incomplete motion such as the one before us today. It is imperative that we allow the IRCC to complete its analysis of this situation in close collaboration with our allies and partners in order to craft a truly effective course of action going forward.

Furthermore, this motion makes no mention of other vulnerable populations targeted by Daesh, including Christians, Shia Muslims, Mandaeans, Druze, Kakais, Shabak, and many more minorities in Iraq. Again, a more in-depth analysis of the situation based on knowledge on the ground and established best practices is certainly required.

Far from being inactive or passive in response to the Yazidi crisis, our government has taken concrete steps to respond to this significant issue. The Yazidi crisis is a multifaceted issue that requires a whole-of-government approach, with input from Global Affairs Canada, the Department of National Defence, Development Canada, and Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada. (1310)

Indeed, Canada has been highly active both internationally and domestically in responding to the issue before us today.

In the international arena, for example, the Government of Canada has taken the following concrete steps, among many others, to assist the Yazidis. In June, the foreign affairs minister declared in this very chamber that Daesh was guilty of committing genocide against the Yazidi population. Similarly, the minister has continuously and forcefully advocated at the United Nations, including formal correspondence with the Security Council, in calling for greater action in response to the Yazidi crisis. Our government has also committed to increase funding to the United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights to document human rights abuses and violations and to collect evidence and investigate serious international crimes.

Furthermore, working as part of a global coalition to combat Daesh, we have increased our military advise and assist missions and have increa...”

John McKay (Liberal)

October 20th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“... enough to reflect our opposition to Daesh's actions.

Less than a year ago, the international coalition campaign against Daesh was about degrading the entity. We are now talking about dismantling and ultimately defeating Daesh. This significant change of language is proof that the work Canada is doing with our allies, with our coalition partners, is helping to stabilize the Middle East and is delivering results.

As members of the House know, the Minister of National Defence has travelled to the region and has met with his counterparts. He came back convinced that an enhanced presence on the ground and increased engagement with local and international partners were necessary for resolving the crisis and restoring stability in the region. This is exactly what Canada has done.

All members of the House debated Canada's response to the crisis in Iraq and Syria back in February. Indeed, over 98 members of the House took part in a five-day debate. I consider that to be an outstanding show of parliamentary engagement and a notable exercise in the democratic process. We did this following a careful and comprehensive review of our options.

On March 8, we voted on a motion. Our collective view was unequivocal: Daesh has to be stopped and defeated.

The situation on the ground has evolved. It has become quite clear that we will only be successful in our efforts to counter the threat posed by Daesh through a combination of security, diplomacy, humanitarian assistance, and development.

Our air task force has remained active, conducting more than 2,507 sorties since the beginning of operations in 2014. Of those, 583 sorties were completed by our Polaris refueller and a further 600 were by the Auroras.

As Canadians are also aware, our government refocused the mission after the parliamentary debate, placing additional emphasis on training, advising, and assisting Iraqi security forces in their efforts to degrade and defeat Daesh. Subsequently, we upped our commitment to training, assisting, and advising by threefold and doubled our commitment to intelligence missions. In addition, we made available, to support the coalition, further intelligence and headquarters personnel.

The goal has been to enable the Iraqi forces to conduct their own offensive operations to reclaim their territory. (1320)

Members will recall that just two years ago, when Daesh started to take over Iraqi territory, Iraqi fighters were paraded in their underwear on their way to their own execution. That is against the rules of international combat, but in addition, it was a terrible display for all the world to see. It is not as if those soldiers were not brave people, but they were poorly trained people. Canada, along with our coalition partners, set about rectifying that so that now, when they are approaching the area of Mosul, they are much better trained.

As of this month, Daesh has lost approximately half the territory it once dominated in Iraq. The 40% of Iraq it dominated is now down to approximately 10%. That 10% is largely centred on Mosul. Members will have read in this morning's papers about the attack on Mosul. They are going about that attack in an organized, disciplined military fashion. We have, with the assistance of our coalition partners, upgraded the quality of the Iraqi security forces—”

John McKay (Liberal)

October 20th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...g terrain, fighters, and resources on multiple fronts as they struggle and scramble to react to the coalition's efforts. In the end, it is the people of Iraq who will be responsible for stabilizing the country. It cannot be done by outside forces. It is they who will ultimately defeat Daesh.

We also recognized that the ultimate solution to regional instability would require more than just military force. This is why, to help address the disastrous crisis in the region, we have focused our efforts on meeting the basic needs of those most impacted by the conflicts in Iraq and Syria, including refugees who have fled to neighbouring countries

In addition to this effort, over the next three years Canada will contribute more than $1.6 billion toward this approach to security, stabilization, humanitarian, and development assistance.

The Government of Canada is committed to the eradication of Daesh, and it is unwavering. Eight months ago, we saw the shifting landscape in theatre, and we adapted our efforts to ensure that Canada's contribution remained at the heart of the coalition campaign. We are now seeing the results of this refocused approach. Our dedicated men and ...”

James Bezan (Conservative)

October 20th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...ow as the battle for Mosul evolves and 1.5 million civilians are at risk inside the city, as 30,000 coalition troops charge the city to root out and destroy ISIS and its roughly 5,000 fighters in the ...”

Kevin Lamoureux (Liberal)

October 20th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...ly there needs to be proper processing to ensure that it is done right and we have to work with our coalition partners as much as possible so that we can maximize the benefits for as many as possible?...”

Peter Kent (Conservative)

October 20th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, the allied coalition battle for the liberation of Mosul will, we hope, see the liberation of more Yazidi women ...”

Marc Miller (Liberal)

October 20th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...t Daesh has clearly shifted along all lines of effort.

Our government's strategy, through the coalition of 65 countries, continues to make a difference as the situation on the ground shifts, in particular, for the millions of people who are suffering as a result of the conflicts in the region. By contributing to the military campaign, supporting stabilization efforts, and countering the flow of foreign fighters and Daesh's financing and its despicable narrative, Canada is helping to address some of the deeper drivers of the conflict and helping to build a stable and secure future for the region's people. We are taking this broad approach to ensure that another terrorist organization does not simply fill the void once Daesh is defeated. To that end, Canada has tripled the number of Canadian Armed Forces members advising and assisting the Iraqi security forces, and is providing assistance to the Kurdish peshmerga, in particular, through the provision of training and equipment. On the intelligence level, we have provided two CP-140 Aurora aerial surveillance aircraft to enhance the intelligence and reconnaissance provided to the coalition's military efforts.

Canada's efforts will also include the clearing of improvised explosive devices. As the Minister of Foreign Affairs announced at the July Iraq pledging conference, co-hosted by Canada in Washington, we will contribute to a U.S.-led initiative to clear lEDs in areas liberated from Daesh to facilitate the return of displaced populations. As of today, Canada will commit an additional $2 million to removing IEDs from Nineveh, one of the most affected provinces in Iraq.[Translation]

Canada is contributing $3.3 million to the Commission for International Justice and Accountability's investigation of crimes committed by Daesh in Iraq. As indicated previously, Canada's contributions are comprehensive and integrated into the coalition's efforts. Now we have to keep up that support if we want to succeed, and the Iraqi people...”

Cheryl Hardcastle (NDP)

October 20th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...arian and security threat posed by ISIS, we know that part of our responsibility has been through a coalition of over 60 countries, which President Obama put together, with the objective of degrading and destroying ISIS. Many members of the coalition, including Norway, South Korea, and New Zealand, are making solely humanitarian and non-co...”

Harjit S. Sajjan (Liberal)

October 19th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ertainty that operational security for the force, and the protection of not only our troops but our coalition partners and the people who we are trying to assist, is foremost.

When it is the app...”

Harjit S. Sajjan (Liberal)

October 19th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...own in Mosul. There is a civilian population there. The plan that we took, in consultation with our coalition partners, was to look into training the right number of Iraqi security forces. That is exactly what we have done, and that is exactly what is needed right now. The support that our troops are providing, the plan that we have in place, the intelligence that we have provided is having a substantial impact for the coalition for the final defeat of ISIL. I am very proud of the work that our men and women in the Ca...”

Bryan May (Liberal)

October 19th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“... in Work Boots, Engineers without Borders, Canadian Welding Association, National Trade Contractors Coalition, and Canadian Apprenticeship Forum.

Collectively, these groups represent tens of tho...”

Deborah Schulte (Liberal)

October 19th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...l from my profession of engineering: Women in Science and Engineering Atlantic Region, the Canadian Coalition of Women in Engineering, Science, Trades and Technology, the Association of Professional E...”

Hélène Laverdière (NDP)

October 18th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, on October 8, a Saudi Arabian-led coalition bombed a funeral in Yemen, killing and wounding hundreds of civilians.

I have two questions for the government. First, will Canada support the UN request for an international investigation of what appear to be war crimes committed by the Saudi coalition in Yemen? Second, can the government assure us that no Canadian-made weapons are being used by this coalition in Yemen?”

Stéphane Dion (Liberal)

October 18th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, we spoke out strongly against the bombing in Yemen by the Saudi Arabian-led coalition. We gave a very clear statement, and I can certainly repeat it in the House and say how mu...”

David Lametti (Liberal)

October 18th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...cturers & Exporters, a great number of agriculture and agrifood associations, as well as the B20, a coalition of leaders from 25 countries, all agree that the TFA should be implemented quickly.

...”

Randy Hoback (Conservative)

October 18th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...h is very green power, and yet they are competing against somebody making something in China, using coal. They can look at that and say they are paying a carbon tax with green power and losing market share because their costs are so high, but the same product made in China with coal power is now coming in and taking their market. That is what is concerning them about this carb...”

Dave Van Kesteren (Conservative)

October 18th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...d, has very much to offer, very much to export. Let us begin with mining. We have large reserves of coal; 32% of the mining in B.C. is coal, 32% is copper, and there is silver and gold. In Alberta we have vast fields of oil and gas. Sa...”

Harjit S. Sajjan (Liberal)

October 17th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...eration on Mosul. As the Prime Minister announced back in February, Canada continues to support the coalition partners. We have expanded our training advise-and-assist mission, we expanded our intelligence, and we established a role 2 hospital. These are among just a few.

This is why we have actually taken so many cities. We have helped the Iraqi security forces take these steps. If we had not done this, the coalition would not have been as effective.”

Harjit S. Sajjan (Liberal)

October 17th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...cting in Iraq. By actually increasing the right type of intelligence, doubling intelligence for the coalition, and tripling the intelligence, we have been able to make the Iraqi security forces more e...”

Jim Eglinski (Conservative)

October 17th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...ion with the 2006 softwood lumber agreement. We are now open for another war.

The U.S. Lumber Coalition has indicated that it is exploring options to launch trade action against Canadian lumber,...”

Harjit S. Sajjan (Liberal)

October 7th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... envoy to counter ISIL for the U.S. and he complimented our work. We will continue to work with our coalition partners to have a continued impact against Daesh.”

Harjit S. Sajjan (Liberal)

October 7th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... situation obviously is going to change and we adjust with it to make sure that we are an effective coalition partner.

In terms of transparency, we have been extremely open with it. Hence, the r...”

Linda Duncan (NDP)

October 7th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...entified major sources were not light fixtures or any product, including auto switches, but in fact coal-fired power and cement plants. Sadly, to date, contrary to what the parliamentary secretary suggested in his speech on the bill, the federal government has absolutely failed to regulate either of those significant sources.

However, in 2005, the Alberta government, to its credit, responded to a multi-stakeholder framework issued by the Clean Air Strategic Alliance and issued regulations requiring coal-fired power plants to capture their mercury emissions. To its additional credit, this past year Alberta moved forward to shut down coal-fired plants in a faster time span due to health reasons.

Interestingly, in 2007, the federal government initiated a public consultation on alternatives to reduce mercury contamination from products containing mercury. One source was compact fluorescent bulbs. Strangely, this alternative, while more energy efficient, contained the dangerous neurotoxin, mercury. I had the privilege of participating in Environment Canada's consultation in Vancouver that year. At that meeting, I raised concern with the mercury contamination potential and that there was no life-cycle strategy. There were strong concerns being voiced across the country that the federal government was merely downloading the costs of recycling, recovering, and disposal of the mercury to the municipalities. As the Canadian Environmental Protection Act requires a cradle-to-grave response to its proposals, the department had failed in addressing this part of its mandate.

There was strong support for the need for a compliance strategy up front to evaluate the efficacy of the approach with these lights to ensure that they would limit harm to health and the environment by requiring the capture of the mercury from the bulbs when disposed. There was also a widely held view across North America that without a regulation requiring the capture of this mercury, there would be no incentive to pursue an alternative cleaner technology.

Some provinces and some municipalities have, in the interim, established programs for the recovery of the bulbs containing mercury, where others have not. Some companies have stepped up, and some have backed down. For the most part, recovery depends on the voluntary actions of homeowners or businesses to take their bulbs to an eco-station, and by and large, the cost is then passed on to the municipalities to pay for the handling, transport, and recycling. Environment Canada has estimated that approximately 10% to 15% of these bulbs sold in Canada are recycled. The rest go to landfills. This dismal showing reflects widespread public ignorance about the issue, hence the bill the member has brought forward.

Back to Bill C-238. The first measure is a proposal for national standards. Indeed, action is needed but it is unclear exactly what mechanism is proposed by the member in the bill. Is it merely another Canada-wide standard that is not legally binding? Is it a code of practice, which is not legally binding as well? (1355)

Both of these measures could be made binding if they were adopted in permits or in regulations issued by provinces or territories. If it were a binding standard, the provinces or territories could enforce, and their law, if enacted, could claim equivalency. In fact, the government could issue a code of practice or a guideline if the agreement was with the provincial and territorial jurisdictions that they were going to take measures to actually make this happen.

I note that the government of the day has already issued notice that by the end of this year, it will issue and have in place a code of practice. I note that the member is proposing a measure, but only to come into effect two years from now, and it is not clear which of the three measures he would come forward with more quickly. Perhaps, given the fact that the government has shown initiative, at least one measure would be expedited.

The second proposed measure is guidelines for disposal facilities. It is not clear whether that would be a code of conduct or a guideline. Again, it would not be binding unless it was implemented by permit by a province or territory, and it would then be binding on the facility that was disposing of the mercury-containing product.

Third, the member proposes a plan for public awareness. There indeed has been a lot of support on the need for action on awareness. As I mentioned earlier, only 10% to 15% of these bulbs are being returned for proper disposal or recycling, so there needs to be awareness. However, there has also been concern that simple public awareness is not going to get it done and that we need additional measures to support, for example, the recycling facility in the member's own riding, Dan-X, which currently recycles mercury.

However, it is clear from our past experience with enterprises like this that have been set up that unless one is obligated to submit the substance for recycling, we cannot guarantee the return. Therefore, indeed, we need public awareness, but we need the first two initiatives more.

The second issue is that the code of practice the government put forward offered training for employees, but by and large, it is homeowners who take these bulbs to the recycling centres, and they are not going to be subject to the training.

In short, I am very pleased that the member has come forward. This is an important action, but I look forward to the member also supporting my initiative and move on the largest source of mercury, which is coal-fired power plants. I look forward to him taking similar action in his province of Nova Scotia....”

Brad Trost (Conservative)

October 6th
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“...dreds of jobs in Alberta and British Columbia involved in the production of metallurgical or coking coal. It is truly a national industry that we need to support.

My home province of Saskatchewan has a big part in making pipe for Canada's oil and gas pipelines. This is the safest way to transport oil across Canada, and natural gas, as well.

The average steel industry job brings each worker $75,000 a year. Yet, Canadians in steel industries are losing their jobs and Canadian metallurgical coal mines are being shut down.

What do we need to do?

We need to support pipelines that...”

Arnold Viersen (Conservative)

October 5th
Hansard Link

Routine Proceedings

“Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to present a petition signed by Canadians from Coaldale, Alberta. The petitioners are concerned about the accessibility and impact of violence and ...”

John Oliver (Liberal)

October 5th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...he most important thing to remember is that Ontario has already moved forward with the cessation of coal-fired producing plants. We are already seeing a dramatic decrease in smog days in Toronto and i...”

Richard Cannings (NDP)

October 5th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ryone knows that those emissions only went down because the economy tanked in 2008 and Ontario took coal-fired plants off the grid. I wonder why his government cut funding for climate action, and why ...”

Jim Carr (Liberal)

October 5th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...tural gas in the global energy mix is likely to increase as a natural transition fuel, cleaner than coal or oil, and more accessible than many renewables. For a country like ours, which is rich in bot...”

Terry Beech (Liberal)

October 4th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...oxide equivalent of HFCs is emitted every single year. That is the carbon dioxide equivalent of 291 coal-fired power plants or the annual emission from 211 million passenger vehicles. This number is growing rapidly as the demand for refrigeration and air conditioning is significantly increasing in developing countries.

That is why Canada and the parties to the Montreal protocol are working this year to negotiate an amendment for a global phase-down of HFCs, a move expected to avoid emissions of more than 75 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent by 2050. This equates to up to half a degree Celsius of global warming by the end of this century. What is more, for some applications, replacing HFCs with climate-friendly refrigerants and technologies can improve energy efficiency by up to 50%, which can significantly reduce energy costs for consumers and businesses. Canada has taken a leadership role internationally in efforts to promote an ambitious HFC amendment under the Montreal protocol, notably by joining forces with Mexico and the United States in putting forward a North American proposal to include a phase-down of HFCs.

Moving away from HFCs will not only make an important contribution to combatting climate change, but it will provide companies in Canada and around the world an opportunity to share their expertise in technologies using climate-friendly alternatives, thereby promoting green growth in Canada and internationally. Indeed, some Canadian companies are already ahead of the game by leading the transition to non-HFC technologies. For instance, some Canadian supermarkets are converting their refrigeration systems to very low global warming technologies that are energy efficient and yield significant cost savings. In particular, Sobeys has converted more than 70 of its stores to be climate friendly, and it plans to extend such conversions to its 1,300 stores right across the country. (1025)

Meanwhile, major automobile manufacturers operating in Canada have started to manufacture new models with air conditioners using climate-friendly alternatives instead of HFCs.

Parties to the Montreal protocol are to conclude negotiations at their upcoming meeting from October 10 to 14 in Rwanda. In the lead-up to this meeting, Canada has been active in building support around the world for an ambitious HFC amendment. Notably, in July, the Minister of Environment and Climate Change participated in an extraordinary meeting of the parties, where the minister met with representatives of key countries, such as China, India, and Saudi Arabia, which we need to bring on board to ensure a comprehensive and effective HFC phase-down.

The minister has also co-chaired several meetings of “high ambition” countries, which notably contributed to the adoption of a New York declaration by the Coalition to Secure an Ambitious HFC Amendment.

Canada has also explicitly recognized that implementing an HFC amendment will require additional resources to assist developing nations. In that regard, Canada strongly supported the statement in this year's G7 declaration in which Canada and other G7 countries committed to providing additional support, through the Montreal protocol's multilateral fund, to developing countries for the implementation of an amendment.

On September 22, Canada joined a group of 16 industrialized countries in a declaration signalling that they stood ready to provide $27 million in additional funding to the multilateral fund as soon as 2017 if an amendment was adopted this year. We are not waiting for the adoption of a global agreement in order to take action at home. The Government of Canada plans to publish, by the end of 2016, proposed regulatory measures to implement a phase-down of HFCs in Canada.

However, Canada represents only a small share of global emissions. This is why Canada has not only been pushing for an agreement under the Montreal protocol. It has also undertaken a range of other initiatives internationally to promote action on HFCs in advance of a global phase-down. For instance, Canada is co-leading an HFC initiative under the Climate and Clean Air Coalition to reduce short-lived climate pollutants, an international partnership composed of 50 coun...”

Garnett Genuis (Conservative)

October 4th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...he environment as other countries pick up the slack. Let us not forget that China is building a new coal plant every week. Maybe the Prime Minister wants to extradite our coal industry to China, but I would like to keep energy jobs in Canada.

This is just like the ...”

Linda Duncan (NDP)

October 4th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... in his party's failure, in the decade it was in power, to take more strident measures to phase-out coal-fired power. Under his government's tenure, it failed to introduce binding federal regulations to reduce mercury, which Alberta, to its credit, did. Now, other coal-fired power plants in Canada do not have to reduce mercury. Second, the Canadian Medical Association has said that, due to the serious health impacts and deaths associated with coal-fired power, we must move expeditiously to phase-out coal.

Does the member share my disappoint in his party's failure to support Alberta's measures...”

Garnett Genuis (Conservative)

October 4th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ced, well, all Canadians have to do is look at the facts, look at the record.

With respect to coal, let me be very clear that the previous Conservative government did put regulations in place, but they are regulations that respect the reality that we are dealing with in an internationally competitive environment, one in which China adds a coal plant every single week. Therefore, we have to proceed in a way that has an effective suite of ...”

Colin Carrie (Conservative)

October 4th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... emissions.

Let us take a look at what is happening around the world today. We have 2,400 new coal plants being constructed or planned to be constructed in developing countries. At the end of 2015, alone, China and India managed to build 665 new coal stations, with plans to build additional 665 plants in the future. That is 1,330 new coal plants in just two countries.

With Canada contributing only 1.6% of global greenhouse gas emissions, our focus should be on helping other countries reduce their emissions from coal-fired power plants. We know the great technology in Saskatchewan. We have seen it. We have done it in Canada. The Prime Minister is failing to promote those technologies around the world.

This would have a bigger impact on reducing emissions globally, in comparison with implementing a mandatory national carbon tax on the provinces. As my colleague stated yesterday, it is scientifically proven that Canada could completely eliminate its carbon footprint and it would not stop or help resolve the issue of global warming.

Our previous Conservative government invested in carbon capture and storage technology, as I said. This could help other countries, such as China and India, reduce their emissions from coal-fired power plants, which ultimately would have a much larger impact on the reduction of global...”

Catherine McKenna (Liberal)

October 4th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...rowing. Canada is blessed with bountiful resources. Our forebears hunted and fished in our forests. Coal and oil helped thrust our ships across the ocean, and propelled our trains from the Canadian Sh...”

Peter Kent (Conservative)

October 4th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...When the Prime Minister opened this debate, he mentioned the benefits to reduced emissions from coal-fired electricity generating plants. However, I was not surprised that he did not mention that it was our Conservative government that imposed a ban on the construction of new traditional coal-fired units, the first government in the world to implement such a ban.

I was not surprised the Prime Minister did not mention our Conservative government's pilot project investment in a world-leading carbon capture and sequestration project in Estevan, Saskatchewan, which led to that provincial government's trail blazing billion dollar-plus investment in a commercial CCS unit at SaskPower's Boundary Dam. This project will enable Saskatchewan to benefit from an estimated 300-year supply of coal, not to leave it in the ground but to burn it cleanly, by capturing one million tonnes of CO2 per year and storing it safely in deep underground reservoirs.

The world is watching the Boundary Dam project, but the Liberals are looking the other way. The Liberals are also looking the other way on our other achievements, hoping Canadians do not remember that our Conservative government also protected a record amount of parkland and made historic investments in wetland and boreal forest restoration and protection, adding considerably to Canada's capacity to sequester GHG emissions in the old fashioned way: nature's carbon storage.

After the transportation and coal-fired sectors regulations, we began work on setting emissions limiting regulations for the oil ...”

Joël Godin (Conservative)

October 4th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ght to limit HFCs, black carbon, and methane; and we established new rules to reduce emissions from coal-fired power plants. (1210)

Furthermore, we put in place measures to support the developm...”

Monique Pauzé (Bloc Québécois)

October 4th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... economic reality. Some provinces have more work to do than others. Those provinces could shut down coal-fired plants, for example. Since Quebec is ahead of the game, we could take measures regarding ...”

Cathay Wagantall (Conservative)

October 4th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...here the balance is.

In my home province of Saskatchewan, we are carbon sequestering with our coal plants. The minister was there, and it is phenomenal what they are willingly doing. Our souther...”

Martin Shields (Conservative)

October 4th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...s deal with climate change.

For example, we are on the precipice of some very advanced, clean coal technology, which may allow us to re-examine the use of clean coal in some parts of the world, including parts of Canada. I want to be clear that we are not talking about the dirty soot-spewing coal of production in the past, but a much cleaner and modern alternative. That is one example of adaptability.

Windmills are interesting and an increasing power source, but it is taking more and more coal mining to make the steel to make the blades than ever before. Where is that happening? Not in t...”

Marilyn Gladu (Conservative)

October 4th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... the U.S., and the U.K. make up 60% of the footprint. China has no carbon tax and is still building coal plants. The U.S. has no carbon tax.

I wonder if the member would comment further on what ...”

David McGuinty (Liberal)

October 4th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... the insurance industry that blew the whistle two decades ago and told us there was a canary in the coal mine. Major storms are becoming more frequent, claim costs are way up, and insurability is way ...”

Linda Duncan (NDP)

October 4th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ey promised during the election and for which people are calling, including more rapid phase-out of coal-fired power and to incent the direction toward a cleaner economy.

Does the member agree w...”

Michael Cooper (Conservative)

October 4th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...rgy sectors. We brought forward comprehensive regulations that have effectively phased out building coal-fired power plants. We invested billions of dollars in clean technology.

Do members know ...”

Pat Kelly (Conservative)

October 4th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...wing demand for the future. If we do not, other countries may simply build greenhouse gas intensive coal plants for electrical generation instead. If the government is serious about reducing greenhouse gas emissions, it should stop talking and get to work repealing barriers to the kinds of innovation that allow a measured transition to a lower carbon economy.

That said, however ideal a future of renewable energy may be, answering the call of extremism for a carbon-free economy immediately would be an economic disaster. Canada's prosperity and high standard of living depend on reliable, abundant, and affordable energy. Increasing the cost of energy would have a drastic effect on businesses and families. That effect is well known to the people of Ontario. Just last week, I read a news article about a couple in L'Orignal, Ontario, whose electricity bill has tripled since 2012. Despite having a well-insulated home, keeping the thermostat at a chilly 15o C in the winter, and despite only heating select portions of the house to reduce costs, these seniors pay almost as much for power as they do in rent. In a country with such abundant reserves of energy as Canada, it is outrageous that an ill-considered government policy should drive seniors into energy poverty. In a developed country, we must not let a warm home, access to refrigeration, the ability to cook, and to see after dark become luxuries that only the wealthy can afford. (1710)

The current government likes to speak about how much it is helping seniors, yet now it is talking about introducing a carbon tax that will raise the cost of living. It seems hypocritical to boast of improving the lot of seniors with more income while implementing policies which drive up costs. Expenses are just as important as revenue and personal finance, government finance, and especially the finances of people on fixed incomes.

Albertans are also struggling and do not want a carbon tax. When asked by The Local Parliament Project during the 2015 election, over 60% of those with an opinion opposed such a tax. I do not need a poll to know that my constituents oppose job-killing taxes like a carbon tax. When I speak to the constituents of Calgary Rocky Ridge, they described the hardships caused by massive losses in the energy industry. They describe their fear that Alberta's carbon tax threatens years of decline and contraction in our energy sector. They also wonder why Canadian energy companies in Canada are investing in Texas when more than 100,000 Albertan energy workers are unemployed.

My constituents know the answer, which is that the government is scaring investors away from Canada though mixed messages and confusing rhetoric about the so-called green economy. The government is threatening to cripple Canada's energy sector through national carbon taxes. It is running roughshod over the provinces with its style of heavy-handed executive federalism, despite constant rhetoric about consultations and consensus. A good and responsible government must take the effects of its statements and policy plans on Canadian families into account. Fellow Canadians working in the energy sector and its spin-off industries need work today, work tomorrow, and they will continue to need work during any transition period.

In addition, I reject the government's assertion that an economically ruinous carbon tax is a so-called market solution to industrial emissions. There is nothing free market about adding a tax to everything. A market system is when supply and demand set optimal prices naturally. Taxes on carbon dioxide inject dead-weight loss and distortion into the market, destroying value, and making everything more expensive. Likewise, cap-and-trade schemes are not free market based, since they create a new commodity out of thick air and force people to buy it starting at mandated prices.

One can call the trade of carbon credits a market, yet it is merely an exchange of legal fictions to avoid legal fines. Drastically increasing the price of energy could plunge Canadians into the type of poverty the developed world has not seen in decades.

Just as innovation led humans from burning forests to burning coal for heat, from burning whale oil to burning kerosene for light, from using high-emission horses...”

Linda Duncan (NDP)

October 4th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... Alberta.

You might want to take a look at the actual class of fossil fuel, and in particular coal-fired power compared to renewables, if you finally factor in the health costs. We can take a lo...”

Robert Aubin (NDP)

October 4th
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“...nywhere in the world, but that is not what we are talking about. I can say that just last week, the Coalition d'aide aux victimes de la pyrrhotite of Trois-Rivières was in Connecticut, where the situ...”

Justin Trudeau (Liberal)

October 3rd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...r. In Toronto there were 53 smog days in 2005. A decade later, thanks in part to the phasing-out of coal-fired generating stations, there were zero smog days. This is a very big deal if one's child ha...”

Ed Fast (Conservative)

October 3rd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...dels.

We went on in 2012 to finalize regulations to address carbon dioxide emissions from the coal-fired electricity sector, which made Canada the first country to effectively ban construction of traditional dirty coal facilities. In fact, over the next 21 years, those regulations are expected to result in a cumulative reduction in GHG emissions of about 240 megatonnes, equivalent to removing some 2.6 million personal vehicles from the road. That is a great achievement. We also established an air quality management system, which resulted in ambitious air quality standards for fine particulate matter and ground-level ozone, the main components of smog, as members know.

Under the watch of our previous government, pollutants causing acid rain were cut by 15% as part of this program. I noticed the Prime Minister referred to pollution in addressing air pollution. We support all efforts to reduce the impact of toxins within our air sheds.

We also invested billions of dollars in science and technology initiatives to address air quality and climate change. These investments included the development of CO2 capture and storage technologies to reduce atmospheric carbon emissions from large-point sources. We launched the eco-energy biofuel initiative, which invested $1.5 billion to support the production of renewable alternatives to gasoline and diesel fuel.

However, one note of caution is that when governments raise taxes in order to purportedly invest in green solutions, as I understand the Liberals are proposing to do, history shows that they are notoriously bad at picking winners and loser. Any investments in technology must, to the greatest extent possible, be market driven and free of political manipulation.

We are also proud of our record of working closely with the United States on joint North American initiatives. In 2009, our former Conservative government established the United States-Canada clean energy dialogue to enhance bilateral co-operation on the development of clean energy science to combat climate change, which as of 2015 included over 50 projects either completed or under way. It was through our government that major headway was made in joint Canada-USA electricity connectivity and cross-boundary clean energy research and development.

Through the Canada-United States air quality agreement, we began to work to align our regulations with the United States in order to reduce methane emissions from the oil and gas sector. The fruits of this labour were announced by the Liberal government early this year in Washington, D.C., and we applaud that. (1245)

The long and short of successful bilateral and multilateral regulatory co-operation alignment is that it ensures a level playing field for businesses and industries in Canada that want to do their part to respond to climate change, but do not want to be rendered uncompetitive. I encourage the current government to continue to advance regulatory co-operation, especially with our NAFTA partners, the United States and Mexico.

I have a few thoughts on conservation.

Under our former Conservative government, Canada was the first industrialized country to sign and ratify the Convention on Biological Diversity. We subsequently launched the national conservation plan under which we took significant strides to restore, conserve, and expand Canada's natural spaces. Indeed, over a period of 10 years, we were able to increase by 50% the amount of Canadian parkland that had been set aside for protection.

Alan Latourelle, the former CEO of Parks Canada, recently explained that:

...the last 15 years have seen one of the most significant national park expansion programs in the history of our country...As we prepare to celebrate the 150th anniversary of our nation, we need to stand tall and proud and celebrate the exceptional contributions we have made to conservation internationally, while charting a bold and inspiring path for the future.

Some of the things that we were able to achieve over the last 10 years were the following: the world's first protected area extending from the mountain tops to the sea floor, Gwaii Haanas National Marine Conservation Area Reserve and Haida Heritage Site in British Columbia; the world's largest freshwater protected area, Lake Superior National Marine Conservation Area; a sixfold expansion of the Nahanni National Park Reserve in the Northwest Territories; three new national wildlife areas in Nunavut, protecting close to 5,000 square kilometres of marine coastal and terrestrial habitat, including the world's first sanctuary for bowhead whales; three new marine protected areas under the Oceans Act, Musquash Estuary in New Brunswick, Bowie Seamount off the coast of British Columbia, and the Tarium Niryutait in the Beaufort Sea; and finally, the expansion of Canada's national parks network by creating Canada's 44th national park, the Nááts'ihch'oh National Park Reserve. We also played a major role in the creation of the world-class Great Bear Rainforest agreement through an ecological investment of $30 million.

Why is conservation so important to us as Conservatives and should be important to the Liberal government? Because our natural spaces are highly effective in capturing and sequestering carbon dioxide.

Indeed, it is estimated that Canada's forests, wetlands, and farmlands absorb significantly more carbon dioxide every year than Canadians collectively emit. Given the size of our country and the nature of our geography and population, we know that improved forestry management practices, such as ecosystem-based management, wetland reclamation, boreal forest protection, and low and no-till farming methods can contribute significantly to not only reducing our national carbon footprint, but absorbing global greenhouse gas emissions.

Any national climate change plan must include a conservation strategy in partnership with first nations, which builds upon the significant successes of the past 10 years. Sadly, most of the Liberal government's discussion of a pan-Canadian framework on climate change has been monopolized by a fixation on carbon taxes: taxes, taxes, taxes.

We should not at all be surprised. Every few years a creature in the form of a Liberal government arises from the ashes and its members immediately morph into the quintessential tax-and-spend Liberal. Such members are characterized by a penchant for raising taxes in order to increase the amount of money their government has to spend on its priorities rather than on the priorities of Canadians. The current Liberal government is, of course, no different. That is why Canadians are hearing so much about carbon pricing, which is nothing less than an effort to tax Canadians into doing the right thing on the environment. (1250)

Sadly, most of the efforts to implement carbon pricing at the provincial level play into that narrative and are doomed to failure. It is incumbent upon the federal government to learn from carbon pricing mistakes being made, both at home and in other parts of the world.

Witness the European experience with cap and trade, in which carbon credit prices effectively collapsed under the weight of corruption, abuse, and favouritism, where we now see countries like Germany building new coal-fired power plants instead of permanently phasing out coal. A number of my environment committee colleagues and I recently met with seven MPs from Norway....”

Ed Fast (Conservative)

October 3rd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...nvested heavily in. I talked about a biofuel strategy, which we invested heavily in. I talked about coal-fired electricity and regulating that sector so that over time we would move away from coal to cleaner energy. I talked about regulating the light and heavy-duty vehicle sector so we coul...”

Linda Duncan (NDP)

October 3rd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...se caps on specified sectors. To its credit, Alberta has committed to accelerating the phase-out of coal-fired power and is imposing a cap on greenhouse gases from the oil sands. Is this enough?

The commitment under the Vancouver declaration is to increase the level of ambition of environmental policies over time in order to drive greater greenhouse gas emissions reductions consistent with the Paris agreement. However, the Liberal government is already backtracking to a low bar starting point. The Vancouver declaration also provides no clear timeline for improvement, by how much or by taking what specific actions.

Under the Vancouver agreement, the jurisdictions promise to promote clean economic growth to create jobs. They assert this will be achieved by a transition to a climate-resilient and low-carbon economy but only by 2050. In the meantime, Canada will continue to support their agreed Canadian energy strategy for sustainable energy and resource sector economy as Canada transitions to a low-carbon economy.

The measure of commitment to an energy transition is zero emission target dates and zero commitment of dollars to renewable energy, jobs, and training. We see some evidence of that commitment at the provincial levels by way of an example of the Northwest Territories, which is adopting a renewable energy strategy. Alberta has at long last committed to joining others and establishing an energy efficiency program.

The Vancouver declaration promises the development of an integrated economy-wide approach that includes all sectors, creates jobs, and promotes innovation to be determined at a later date. The same goes for investments in clean technology solutions, especially in areas such as renewable energy, energy efficiency, and cleaner energy production. Few solid commitments are yet stated on achieving reductions.

While the federal government and the provinces promised to make deep reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, to foster and encourage clean technology, and to implement measures grounded in the idea that clean growth and climate change are of net economic development, we still await the concrete measures.

On the central issue of imposing a price on carbon, we are advised there is no consensus. It is equally important to recognize that the Vancouver declaration specifically references the Canadian energy strategy, a strategy developed through a process excluding the public. It is a strategy that in large part endorses co-operation and continuance of the carbon-intensive energy sectors.

What concrete actions has the federal government taken to reduce greenhouse gases? The federal government committed under the Vancouver declaration to take specific and early actions, including investments in green infrastructure, public transit infrastructure, and energy-efficient social infrastructure. However, the government has yet to release any detailed plan for green infrastructure, including what portion of infrastructure dollars would be dedicated to greening. (1320)

During the election campaign, the Liberals promised to tackle climate change and invest in the green economy. However, even their first budget came up far short. After promising over $3 billion for public transit and over $3 billion for green infrastructure in the first two years of their platform, budget 2016 was short by over $800 million for transit and green infrastructure. The budget failed to deliver on their promise to eliminate fossil fuel subsidies, which continue to give hundreds of millions of dollars to polluting industries.

Much of the funding announced in 2016 is just repurposed money, with only $100 million in new money out of the $300 million promised for a clean growth economy this year. The investment in Sustainable Development Technology Canada is just $50 million over four years, far less than previous investments in this entity of $40 million each year. Is this enough action to deliver rapid change? The Canadian investment in clean tech has fallen by 41% over the last decade, while global investments in this sector grew exponentially, surpassing investments in fossil fuels.

We have a lot of catching up to do if we hope to provide economic opportunities for our youth. The Liberals promised to advance the electrification of vehicle transportation, foster regional plans for clean electricity transmission, and invest in clean energy solutions for indigenous, remote, and northern communities, yet their budget commits to levels that will not deliver expedited action on any of these. At least their commitment to reduce methane emissions from oil and gas production substantially by 2025 is good news, as it finally plays catch-up with Alberta.

Canadians had hoped for better. Of concern, the thrust of the Liberal action plan to date has, in the majority, been to download the federal duty to reduce greenhouse gases to the provinces and territories, not to mention the municipalities. When asked what actions her government is taking, the minister now repeats the same refrain, that she is consulting the provinces on a plan.

We are expected to agree to ratification without the courtesy of even seeing the working group reports, which I understand may be coming forward today, including, for example, the report on carbon pricing mechanisms. It is important to recognize that the burning of fossil fuels delivers impacts beyond climate change. They emit significant sources of pollutants, causing well-documented impacts to our health and the environment. The Government of Alberta strategy recognizes this aspect in announcing the accelerated phase-out of coal power. Many others are calling for the federal government to follow suit and amend its regulati...”

Candice Bergen (Conservative)

October 3rd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... States, have the ability to reduce their GHGs—China specifically—if they replace some of their coal fired production with, for example, Canadian LNG.

Is there room in this discussion and in...”

Linda Duncan (NDP)

October 3rd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...anada can do to assure that, even if we do export our gas to China, it will use that gas to replace coal fires. What I am aware of is that China has made monumental investments, and has committed to additional monumental investments, in deploying renewable energy instead of coal fired.

What would be really nice is if her government had expedited, and if the Liberal government would expedite, the accelerated phase-out of coal fired power in this country. I think that would set a far better example than simply asking why...”

Marilyn Gladu (Conservative)

October 3rd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...o help countries with higher levels of carbon emissions.

For example, China is still building coal-fired power plants. Canada could help improve the situation by using alternatives, such as liqu...”

Marilyn Gladu (Conservative)

October 3rd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“Mr. Speaker, obviously we are doing things. We have eliminated coal production. We are focusing on renewable energy. We are doing carbon sequestration. There are a number of areas of technology where we are actually leading, and we need to leverage that to places like China, which are still building coal plants and make up one-third of the world's footprint.”

Marilyn Gladu (Conservative)

October 3rd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...g. We just need to attack the ones in the world who cause 60% of the problem and are still building coal plants.”

Linda Duncan (NDP)

October 3rd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ther measures that their government could have taken would have been to fast-track the phase-out of coal-fired power. They could have mirrored the measures taken by the premier of Alberta because of the clear evidence provided by the Canadian Medical Association of the serious health and environmental impacts of coal-fired power.

I wonder if the member would respond as to why her government did not take s...”

Dianne L. Watts (Conservative)

October 3rd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...that there were a number of things done. We introduced new regulations to reduce emissions from the coal-fired electricity generation, working to phase that out, as I have heard.

I think there i...”

Jonathan Wilkinson (Liberal)

October 3rd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... of carbon pricing. Furthermore, all of these business leaders joined the carbon pricing leadership coalition. This World Bank-led initiative is an international voluntary partnership under which 74 c...”

Kevin Waugh (Conservative)

October 3rd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“..., it is seen as a way for the world to transform to renewable energy. There has to be a balance, as coal-fired power plants may still have sustainable life, not only in my province of Saskatchewan, but next door, in Alberta. Using these facilities will extend the life of many jobs and many local communities in these two provinces, not to mention that there should be some spin-off in selling this technological change worldwide. We can all point to China, as the Chinese are now building one new thermal coal plant every 10 days or so.

Right now, the Boundary Dam near Estevan is one such area in the province that is trying to be that world leader. The Boundary Dam has captured one million tonnes of CO2 this past year. That is equivalent to 240,000 cars being taken off the road, in a province that only has a population of 1.1 million. Saskatchewan mining operations continue to reduce the energy and water usage, and the GHG emissions, through initiatives such as heat recovery co-generation, continuous mining, remote control mining, and the use of electric vehicles. I saw this first-hand when I visited one of the mines about two weeks ago in Allan, Saskatchewan.

This takes time, and with the economy on the brink of disaster, time is needed. That is why the Province of Saskatchewan and our opposition government on this side of the House do not support the Vancouver declaration. Once the lone wolf of reason, Saskatchewan has recently been joined by all three territories, and now Nova Scotia.

Brad Wall, the Premier of Saskatchewan, said today in the legislature, “The level of disrespect shown by the Prime Minister and his government is [ridiculous]. Today is “stunning” in the House of Commons”. Wall made the comments to the Regina Leader-Post, saying the PM unilaterally imposed the carbon on the provinces and the territories. The premier said, “This meeting [this morning was] not worth the CO2 emissions it took for [all] environment ministers to [head to Montreal for discussions...]. This is a betrayal of the statements made by the Prime Minister in Vancouver this March.” That was when they had their meetings.

The Saskatchewan environment minister, Scott Moe, also said today, “the carbon tax will cost each family in [Saskatchewan] about $1,250 a year and the province $2.5 billion, while at the same time threatening jobs in the energy sector. [...][facing] a tax could be on par with Pierre Trudeau's National Energy Program [introduced in the 1980s].”

We all know what that led to: ongoing animosity between western provinces and Liberal governments. (1640)

I might add that Aaron Wudrick, from the Canadian Taxpayers Federation, also slammed the current government, in that an average Canadian family could pay nearly $2,600 per year in new taxes by 2022. Canadians should hang on to their wallets.

These are the numbers that are now coming out. We had not talked about these numbers until I brought them to the House: $1,250 per family in Saskatchewan, and nearly $2,600 per family by the year 2022.

SaskPower, by 2030, wants to be 50% renewables: hydro, wind, solar, and geothermal. There is no guarantee on wind, so it needs to back that up with gas generation.

Saskatchewan, as we all know, and as has been mentioned before in the House, has three coal-fired power plants in the province: Boundary Dam, Shand, and Poplar River. Saskatchewan feels t...”

Dan Vandal (Liberal)

October 3rd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...actions, not just under the UN but through complementary fora such as the Carbon Pricing Leadership Coalition and the Climate and Clean Air Coalition.

This is not just about emission reductions. We also have much to share about our ex...”

Michelle Rempel (Conservative)

October 3rd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...s trends reports shows that regulations on specific high-emission sectors, such as vehicles and the coal-fired electricity sector, have reduced our overall greenhouse gas emissions growth. More import...”

Jim Eglinski (Conservative)

October 3rd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...er and above some provincial carbon tax and some cap and trade program?

My riding is known as coal country. We are proud of the industry. With several coal-fired electrical generating stations, our riding will see a lot more unemployment for people as the plants voluntarily close down due to government regulations. The Genesee hydro facility is one of the latest state-of-the-art facilities. Its greenhouse gas emissions are the lowest in North America, in fact in the world. This was done through science and technology. I believe that these facilities can be made to emit 0% emissions. This is where government and industry should be working together, and in doing so help the world to be more efficient at reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

Besides thermal coal, the Yellowhead is blessed with an abundance of metallurgical coal used in steelmaking. Some argue that it is the best coal in the world. This is probably correct, as it comes out of the Yellowhead. Tech industries are ...”

Linda Duncan (NDP)

October 3rd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...incial policies. These additional emission reduction approaches should include quicker phase out of coal-fired electricity, a national energy public transportation infrastructure, and that the subsidi...”

Brigitte Sansoucy (NDP)

September 30th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...shed since 1853, which makes it the oldest French newspaper in North America. It is a member of the Coalition pour la pérennité de la presse d'information au Québec. Most major newspapers in Quebec...”

Arnold Viersen (Conservative)

September 30th
Hansard Link

Routine Proceedings

“Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to present a petition signed by Canadians from Coaldale, Alberta.

The petitioners are concerned about the accessibility and impact of violent...”

Alexandra Mendès (Liberal)

September 29th
Hansard Link

Routine Proceedings

“... since September 21, 2016.[English]

This petition was initiated by volunteers of the Canadian Coalition for Farm Animals and has some 7,407 signatures, from each and every province and territory...”

Cheryl Hardcastle (NDP)

September 29th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...order. The country is without doubt guilty of war crimes in Yemen, where it has been spearheading a coalition of nine Arab states attempting to affect the outcome of the country's civil war, according...”

Peter Kent (Conservative)

September 29th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...st violently contested region of the world today. Saudi Arabia is an important member of the allied coalition in the war against ISIL, the so-called Islamic state. Iran's support of terrorism is a con...”

Peter Fragiskatos (Liberal)

September 29th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...lobal conference of LGBTI human rights and joined with 29 other countries to found the equal rights coalition. Canada is also a founding member of the freedom online coalition, which seeks to protect and promote people's human rights online. We also work bilaterally...”

John McKay (Liberal)

September 29th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...eace and stability tasks abroad, often with partners and allies within the context of international coalitions, such as the one operating in Iraq today. These are highly dangerous missions. In fact, a...”

Sheila Malcolmson (NDP)

September 26th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...ouver Island University has a proposal for district geo-exchange energy based on flooded, abandoned coal mines that underlie the university campus. The intent is to replace natural gas, to reduce carb...”

Bernard Généreux (Conservative)

September 26th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...pposition party, is doing away with them.

I hope that was brief enough. Clearly, some sort of coalition is forming against us right now, because those bills were important.”

Robert Aubin (NDP)

September 26th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...s Mont-Laurier, and now the State of Connecticut is turning to the expertise of the Trois-Rivières coalition.

However, in Canada, only the government can prevent other cases by reviewing federa...”


The Senate

Hon. Salma Ataullahjan

March 9th
Hansard Link

Prohibiting Cluster Munitions Act Bill to Amend—Second Reading—Debate Adjourned

“...ed and destroyed.

In June 2016, PAX, a Dutch peace group who form a part of the international coalition against indiscriminate weapons, reported that four Canadian financial institutions had inv...”

Hon. Murray Sinclair

March 7th
Hansard Link

Criminal Code Bill to Amend—Second Reading—Debate Continued

“...anadians agreed that spanking should be illegal. The Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario leads a coalition of over 580 national organizations and advocates. That coalition released a Joint Statement on Physical Punishment of Children and Youth and also called fo...”

Hon. Peter Harder (Government Representative in the Senate)

February 28th
Hansard Link

International Development Programs and Initiatives

“...precisely how the Government of Canada will augment its contribution in this area to be part of the coalition of countries to fill this important need.”

Hon. Lynn Beyak

February 28th
Hansard Link

Canadian Human Rights Act Criminal Code Bill to Amend—Second Reading—Debate Continued

“... began, or which we worked on together. In 1990, with other businessmen, Tony founded the Taxpayers Coalition of Fort Frances, and saved local citizens and businesses millions of dollars in taxes over...”

Hon. Marilou McPhedran

February 14th
Hansard Link

Speech from the Throne Motion for Address in Reply—Debate Continued

“...rights under CEDAW. Over 100 Canadian civil society organizations made their voices heard through a coalition coordinated by the Feminist Alliance for International Action, or FAFIA. The CEDAW committ...”

Hon. Claude Carignan (Leader of the Opposition)

February 9th
Hansard Link

National Defence Taxable Measures for Armed Forces Members in Kuwait

“...of Canadian Forces members participating in Operation IMPACT, which is Canada's contribution to the coalition to dismantle and defeat Daesh.

Last fall, Canadian soldiers stationed at a U.S. base...”

Senator Carignan

February 9th
Hansard Link

National Defence Taxable Measures for Armed Forces Members in Kuwait

“...ce you plan on asking for information, could you also ask whether Canada is the only country in the coalition against Daesh that does not treat all its soldiers equally in terms of tax exemptions?”

Hon. Diane Griffin

February 9th
Hansard Link

Literacy on Prince Edward Island Inquiry—Debate Continued

“...s not sustainable.

As part of the Government of Canada Pre-Budget Consultations, the literacy coalitions of P.E.I., Nova Scotia and New Brunswick made a joint submission addressing the importanc...”

Hon. Claude Carignan (Leader of the Opposition)

December 14th
Hansard Link

Environment and Climate Change Energy Targets—Energy Alternatives

“...the ambitious targets set at the 2015 Paris Climate Conference more quickly by reducing the use of coal as an energy source.

Minister, do you believe that natural gas is a desirable transitional energy source? Should we encourage heavy energy consumers to use natural gas instead of coal? With that in mind, should we encourage Canadian provinces to develop their shale gas producti...”

Hon. Catherine McKenna, P.C., M.P., Minister of Environment and Climate Change

December 14th
Hansard Link

Environment and Climate Change Carbon Pricing—Competitiveness

“...across the country, as do the business leaders who have signed on to our Carbon Pricing Leadership Coalition. These are the biggest businesses in Canada, including the major energy companies, many b...”

Hon. Catherine McKenna, P.C., M.P., Minister of Environment and Climate Change

December 14th
Hansard Link

Environment and Climate Change Carbon Tax

“... Moe. I was very pleased about advances we were able to make with respect to an early phase-out of coal and finding an equivalency agreement.

Saskatchewan is committed to most elements of our...”

Hon. Paul E. McIntyre

December 14th
Hansard Link

Environment and Climate Change New Brunswick—Climate Change Plan

“...al government announced its climate change plan. Included in that plan was the pledge to phase out coal as the source of electricity. As you know, the only coal-burning power plant in New Brunswick is located in Belledune. However, there is a condition attached to the plan, the condition being that the province receives the necessary support from other partners, such as the federal government, NB Power, and local stakeholders. That said, could you inform us if your government is in the process of negotiating a package deal with New Brunswick that will determine the future of the Belledune coal-burning power plant? If so, what will the package include? Will it include green infrastructu...”

Hon. Catherine McKenna, P.C., M.P., Minister of Environment and Climate Change

December 14th
Hansard Link

Environment and Climate Change New Brunswick—Climate Change Plan

“Thank you, honourable senator. I was very pleased that we were able to work with the four coal-burning provinces to find agreements with all of them and a path forward. We've had many discu...”

Hon. Michael L. MacDonald

December 14th
Hansard Link

Environment and Climate Change United States—Carbon Tax

“Thank you, minister, for being here. I must say, as somebody who witnessed China build 230 coal-fired plants last year, it's great to see they've changed their tune on this matter.

Ou...”

Hon. Catherine McKenna, P.C., M.P., Minister of Environment and Climate Change

December 14th
Hansard Link

Environment and Climate Change United States—Carbon Tax

“... that, in terms of China, they've just announced that they're going to put a cap on emissions from coal. They are the single largest investor in Canadian solar; a Canadian company is doing extraordi...”

Senator Lankin

December 13th
Hansard Link

Tobacco Act Non-smokers' Health Act Bill to Amend—Second reading—Debate Adjourned

“...izations such as the Non- Smokers' Rights Association, Physicians for a Smoke-Free Canada, Ontario Coalition for Action on Tobacco and Quebec Coalition for Tobacco Control.

Along with the correspondence they have attached a confidential presentation from Imperial Tobacco, which was leaked by an industry whistle-blower. The documentation suggests that organizations such as Canadian Convenience Stores Association and the National Coalition Against Contraband Tobacco are active lobbying organizations which have relationships wit...”

Hon. Yonah Martin (Acting Leader of the Opposition)

December 2nd
Hansard Link

Prime Minister's Office Visit of the Vice President of the United States—Softwood Lumber

“... which the Liberal government has so far failed to provide.

On November 25, the U.S. Lumber Coalition filed a petition with the United States government to impose duties on Canadian softwood ...”

Hon. Daniel Lang

December 1st
Hansard Link

Study on Issues Related to the Government's Current Defence Policy Review Seventh Report of National Security and Defence Committee and Request for Government Response—Debate Adjourned

“...presently deployed on UN missions. In addition, more than 1,000 military personnel are deployed on Coalition and NATO missions in Iraq, Syria and Ukraine, and an additional 455 members of the milita...”

Hon. Pierre-Hugues Boisvenu

November 24th
Hansard Link

Quebec Sex Offender Registry

“Honourable senators, on Friday, November 18, André Spénard and Nathalie Roy, members of Coalition Avenir Québec, introduced, for the first time, in the Quebec National Assembly, a motion...”

Hon. Daniel Lang

November 22nd
Hansard Link

Environment and Climate Change Closure of Coal-Fired Facilities

“...e that's affecting, in good part, Western Canada. That issue is the question of the closure of the coal- powered stations, primarily in Alberta, British Columbia, Saskatchewan and Nova Scotia. The d...”

Hon. Peter Harder (Government Representative in the Senate)

November 22nd
Hansard Link

Environment and Climate Change Closure of Coal-Fired Facilities

“...nts made by the Government of Canada to build on provincial programs with respect to accelerating coal phase-out. The 2030 date of the announcement parallels, by the way, the commitment made by the Government of Alberta.

The smog from coal-fired plans, as honourable senators will know, can lead to asthma and other respiratory issues for young people as well as seniors. The phase-out of coal-fired electricity- producing facilities is the equivalent of taking out about 1.3 million cars...”

Senator Harder

November 22nd
Hansard Link

Environment and Climate Change Closure of Coal-Fired Facilities

“...as equivalency agreements so they can be tailored to specific jurisdictions as we transition from coal dependency to coal-free energy sources.

This is a policy statement that is forward-looking and fully compli...”

Hon. Larry W. Campbell

November 22nd
Hansard Link

Environment and Climate Change Closure of Coal-Fired Facilities

“..., I have a question for the Government Representative.

Senator Harder, are you aware of any coal-fired plants in British Columbia? I'm just trying to make a correction here.”

Senator Harder

November 22nd
Hansard Link

Environment and Climate Change Closure of Coal-Fired Facilities

“I believe British Columbia is the one jurisdiction that already is independent of coal-fired generators.”

Senator Campbell

November 22nd
Hansard Link

Environment and Climate Change Closure of Coal-Fired Facilities

“That's correct; there are no coal-fired generators in British Columbia. Thank you.”

Hon. Joseph A. Day (Leader of the Senate Liberals)

November 3rd
Hansard Link

The Honourable James S. Cowan Congratulations on 2016 Advocacy Award Conferred by the American Society of Human Genetics

“...at took place in Vancouver on October 21. Our colleague Senator Cowan, together with the Canadian Coalition for Genetic Fairness, was awarded the 2016 Advocacy Award by the American Society of Human Genetics at their annual convention.

The American Society of Human Genetics is based near Washington, D.C. Their nearly 8,000 members include researchers, academics, clinicians, laboratory practice professionals, genetic counsellors and nurses — the full range of professionals who specialize in human genetic science and medicine in the United States, Canada and around the world.

This was only the second year the society has given this award, and they chose Senator Cowan and the Canadian Coalition for Genetic Fairness for their work to prohibit and prevent genetic discrimination in Canada.

As colleagues know, Senator Cowan has been working on this issue for several years now, having first tabled legislation in this chamber in 2013. His private member's bill, Bill S-201, passed this chamber in April of this year and is now before the Standing Committee on Justice and Human Rights in the House of Commons, after receiving unanimous support in a standing vote at second reading in that chamber.

Now, Senator Cowan would be the first to caution that the bill has not yet passed in the other place, but this award, from the leading genetic science association in the world, is an impressive international recognition of the importance of his work in our Parliament, in the Senate of Canada, and how we make a mark in the world.

Our colleague is truly a national and now an international champion for genetic fairness. Please join with me in congratulating him and the Canadian Coalition for Genetic Fairness for the award and especially for their important efforts to end gene...”

Senator Petitclerc

November 3rd
Hansard Link

Food and Drugs Act Bill to Amend—Second Reading—Debate Continued

“...lp the province fill some gaps that still exist.

[Translation]

Quebec's Weight Coalition has repeatedly reminded us that exceptions in the Quebec legislation, which allow packagi...”

Hon. Diane Bellemare (Legislative Deputy to the Government Representative in the Senate)

November 1st
Hansard Link

Canada Labour Code Bill to Amend—Second Reading—Debate Adjourned

“...ational voice for eight provincial open shop construction associations. It succeeded the Canadian Coalition of Open Shop Construction Associations, which was founded in 1999 to challenge the consti...”

Hon. Anne C. Cools

November 1st
Hansard Link

National Anthem Act Bill to Amend—Second Reading—Debate Continued

“...hen, weeks before his retirement, Senator Allan MacEachen spoke of his youth, and of his father, a coal miner in Inverness, a Cape Breton Island mining town. He told us that his father went down to the coal mines daily for 46 years, called to work by the whistle.

(1730)

Colleagues, many of these miners never saw the light of day. The townsfolk well knew the whistle's signals. He talked about the variety of signals and what they meant. He said the townsfolk well knew the whistle's signals, including the one that was the voice of tragedy. When heard, the townspeople ran to the mines to see if miners had been injured or killed.

He noted that trouble and tragedy were a central part of Cape Breton's coal industry. Ever mindful of the harsh working conditions of Canadian men and women, I note "Bre...”

Hon. Percy Mockler

October 27th
Hansard Link

Natural Resources Softwood Lumber Negotiations

“...tiating a new softwood lumber agreement with the United States. It is incredible. The U.S. Lumber Coalition recently said in a press release, and I quote:

[English]

With the expiration of the standstill and no agreement attained, the Coalition has no choice but to move to initiate trade cases against unfairly traded imports from Canada at the most effective time.

[Translation]

Can the Leader of the Government in the Senate tell us whether the government tried to get assurances from the U.S. government that any trade action proposed by the Lumber Coalition will be suspended while negotiations are in progress?

[English]”

Hon. David M. Wells

October 26th
Hansard Link

Justice for Victims of Corrupt Foreign Officials Bill (Sergei Magnitsky Law) Bill to Amend—Second Reading—Debate Continued

“... that has occurred in the Russian government. This case has been referred to as the "canary in the coal mine" that unveiled Russia's politics of oppression, corruption and brutality. It is unlikely...”

Hon. Richard Neufeld

October 18th
Hansard Link

Pacific NorthWest LNG Tuesday, October 18, 2016

“...fit-sharing agreements.

British Columbia is in a unique position to help displace the use of coal in Asian markets and help reduce GHG emissions globally with the world's cleanest liquefied n...”

Hon. Frances Lankin

October 5th
Hansard Link

Food and Drugs Act Bill to Amend—Second Reading—Debate Adjourned

“...ages being delivered.

I had the opportunity to meet with representatives from the Canadian Coalition for Tobacco Control recently, who showed me the advances that have gone on with packaging...”

Hon. Claude Carignan (Leader of the Opposition)

October 4th
Hansard Link

The Honourable Jacques Demers Congratulations on Induction into Quebec Sports Hall of Fame

“...ite, a fact he revealed to us only later. He quit school after grade 8 at age 13 and had to shovel coal into a furnace to support his family.

With his coaching career well established, he con...”

Senator Martin

September 27th
Hansard Link

Natural Resources Pacific Northwest LNG Pipeline Project

“...a provincial government has argued that LNG exports from the province will help reduce the use of coal in Asia, thereby reducing global greenhouse gas emissions.

In making its decision, I'm ...”


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