Coal: The Last Six Months
Of Federal Activity

About

This Report

This is a computer-generated report that shows all of the federal activity with respect to the keyword "Coal" over the last six months. This is a demonstration of the power of our government relations automation software.

Hansard

House: 117 Speeches
Senate: 28 Speeches

House Senate

Bills

Active: 0

Regulations

Filed: 0
Proposed: 0

The House

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

June 20th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...peaker, our government stands strong in the fight against Daesh and will continue to be part of the coalition, as we defend minorities of all types from the murderous terrorist organization of Daesh a...”

Mr. Francis Scarpaleggia (Lac-Saint-Louis, Lib.)

June 14th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...da in 2022, as much as taking 26 million cars off the road for a year or shutting down more than 20 coal plants. The study also found that GDP growth would remain strong with a nationwide price on carbon pollution. Canada's GDP is expected to grow by approximately 2% a year between now and 2022, with or without carbon pricing. (1225) [Translation]

Almost 85% of Canadians already live in a province or territory that puts a price on carbon pollution, and all governments have committed to some form of carbon pricing.

To extend carbon pricing across Canada, in October 2016, the Prime Minister released the federal carbon pricing standard, a benchmark, that gives provinces and territories the flexibility to implement the type of system that is best for them, while setting certain basic criteria that all systems must meet to ensure that they are fair and effective.

The Government of Canada is also committed to developing and implementing a federal carbon pricing system as a backstop. This backstop will therefore apply to any province or territory that does not have a carbon pricing system that meets the federal standard.

The greenhouse gas pricing act establishes the legal framework for the federal carbon pricing system, which serves as a backstop. The primary objective of the act is to help reduce Canada’s greenhouse gas emissions by ensuring that a price is set on carbon across Canada and that it increases over time.

As part of its commitment to the Canada-wide approach to carbon pricing, the government will apply the federal pricing system only to the provinces and territories that it lists in schedule 1 of the act because they do not have a system that meets the benchmark. It also states that it will assess the provincial and territorial systems annually to ensure that they continue to meet this benchmark.

The federal carbon pricing system introduced by the act has two components: a levy on fossil fuels that is generally payable by fuel producers or distributors, also known as “fuel costs”; and a performance-based system for industrial facilities, also known as “production-based pricing”. These components are intended to complement each other and to ensure that there is no double pricing.

In December, the Minister of Finance and the Minister of the Environment and Climate Change wrote to the provincial and territorial governments to provide them with the carbon pricing timelines. Provinces and territories wishing to establish or maintain their own systems must confirm their intentions by September 1, 2018. The Government of Canada will then determine whether the provincial and territorial systems will meet the federal carbon pricing standard.

In provinces and territories that do not meet the federal standard, the federal carbon pricing system will apply as of January 1, 2019, at an initial price of $20 per tonne of emissions. Provincial and territorial systems will be assessed annually. This timeline provides clarity to everyone involved and will enable consumers, businesses, and investors to make informed decisions.[English]

Businesses already know carbon pricing makes good sense. According to a report from the Carbon Disclosure Project, the number of companies with plans to internally price their own carbon pollution increased between 2014 and 2017, from 150 to almost 1,400. The list includes more than 100 of the world's largest companies, with total annual revenues of $7 trillion.

In Canada, many energy companies, our top five banks, and major consumer goods companies support a price on pollution. They are all part of the Carbon Pricing Leadership Coalition. They know carbon pricing can make Canadian businesses more innovative and competitive, an...”

Mr. Andy Fillmore (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Democratic Institutions, Lib.)

June 14th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“... investments in public transit, green infrastructure, and clean innovation. It includes phasing out coal, improving energy efficiency, and cutting methane emissions from the oil and gas sector, and it includes a national price on carbon pollution.

I am quite proud to say that our plan now also includes putting a climate lens on infrastructure funded by the federal government. I would like to pause on that new green filter for just a moment, because it is a recent development and one that I have been working towards since my first days as a member of Parliament.

In 2016, I introduced private member's Motion No. 45 to this House, calling on the government to take into account the impact infrastructure has on Canada's greenhouse gas emissions. As the MP for Halifax, I represent one of Canada's primary coastal cities, and it is no exaggeration to say that Halifax is on the front lines of climate change when it comes to threats like worsening storms and sea level rise.

At the same time, our government is making an historic investment in infrastructure, $180 billion over 12 years. That is an investment that is going to transform our communities for the better. We also know, at the same time, that infrastructure has the potential to lock in greenhouse gas emissions for years to come.

We find ourselves at a pivotal moment in our history. It is a moment that comes with a remarkable opportunity and a responsibility to get it right. That is why, in 2016, I put forward Motion No. 45, requesting that the government put a climate lens on infrastructure that it chooses to fund. It passed, and I am so glad that this climate lens has now been worked into federal policy as a required part of the bilateral funding agreements being signed between the Government of Canada and all provinces and territories. That means that as part of our infrastructure plan, applicants seeking federal funding for new major public infrastructure projects will now have to undertake an assessment of how their projects will impact greenhouse gas emissions and consider the climate change risks in the location, design, operation, and maintenance of those projects. As a city planner and as the MP for Halifax, I view that as a significant win for our city and for the sustainability and resiliency of communities all across Canada.

I have just outlined some of the measures our government has put in place to protect our environment, but of course, we are here today to talk about putting a price on carbon pollution. Why? We are doing it because pricing carbon pollution works. It is the most effective, least expensive way to achieve our climate goals. It encourages innovation and keeps our economy strong. The simple fact is that without carbon pricing, cutting pollution would be much more expensive.

Canadians know that pollution is not free. Climate pollution leads to droughts and floods and wild fires and extreme weather, and all of these have major costs. Insurance claims from severe weather in Canada have been going up. They are more than three times higher today than they were in the 1980s and 1990s, a trend that is expected to continue.

Pollution also harms people's health, which has personal physiological costs and monetary costs for our health care system. Right now, it is the people most affected by these impacts who are paying the price: northerners; coastal communities; the people whose homes are flooded, as we saw in New Brunswick this spring; or those with asthma or other health conditions worsened by pollution. That is not right.

Carbon pricing, on the other hand, is based on the idea that the polluter should pay. Experts around the world agree. Carbon pricing is one of the most cost-effective ways to reduce emissions. That is because it is not prescriptive. It allows companies and individuals to make their own decisions on how best to cut their emissions.

In Canada, more than 80% of us already live in jurisdictions with carbon pricing in place. Recognizing that each province and territory has unique circumstances, the pan-Canadian approach would allow provinces and territories the flexibility to choose a system that makes the most sense for them: an explicit price-based system, like in B.C. or Alberta; or a cap and trade system, like in Ontario and Quebec.

To ensure that a price on carbon pollution is in place across Canada, the Government of Canada has also committed to developing and implementing a federal carbon-pricing system as a backstop. This system would apply in any province or territory that requested it or that did not have a carbon pricing system in place by 2018 that met the federal standard. (1320)

We have seen how carbon pricing has worked in British Columbia. Over the past decade, B.C.'s carbon price has reduced emissions by between 5% and 15%. Meanwhile, provincial real GDP grew by more than 17% from 2007 to 2015, and per capita gasoline demand dropped 15% over that period. B.C.'s growing clean technology sector now brings in an estimated $1.7 billion in annual revenue.

In 2017, B.C., Alberta, Ontario, and Quebec, the four provinces with carbon pricing systems in place, were also the top four performers in GDP growth across Canada. Anyone who says that carbon pricing hurts economies is not basing their arguments on science or the evidence but rather on ignorance and fear.

Consider this. People may have seen recently that the Government of Canada released a report showing that carbon pricing could reduce carbon pollution by up to 90 million tonnes across Canada by 2022. That is like taking 26 million cars off the road for a year or shutting down more than 20 coal plants.

At the same time, the report also found that GDP growth would remain strong with ...”

Mr. Adam Vaughan (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Families, Children and Social Development (Housing and Urban Affairs), Lib.)

June 14th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...g the other side talk about their record on climate change, I wonder how many times one can close a coal plant. The largest reduction in greenhouse gases was a direct result of the provincial government in Ontario closing coal plants. They can only be closed once. They cannot be closed more to get better results. Once it is closed, it is done. One has to move on to another coal plant. By the way, they opposed closing them in Alberta.

The other major contributor to t...”

Mr. Mike Bossio

June 14th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...sures across the economy that complement carbon pricing to cut emissions. These include phasing out coal-fired power; improving the energy efficiency of buildings, vehicles, and industries; and cuttin...”

Hon. Andrew Scheer (Leader of the Opposition, CPC)

June 13th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...Ontario has now joined the group of provinces that opposes a carbon tax.

The Prime Minister's coalition for his carbon tax is unravelling. Will he finally come clean on how much the costs will b...”

Ms. Linda Duncan (Edmonton Strathcona, NDP)

June 12th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“... which amounts to over 2,000 jobs. Germany has just committed to a more fast-paced phase-out of its coal power and greater reliance on renewables, in parallel with a just transition strategy for its workers. Across the EU, renewable energy is on track to be 50% of the energy supply by 2030. As I suggested, this is the growing workforce of the world.

This is what sustainability looks like. How do we get there? Why is federal action for a just transition for workers necessary? Without foresight and action now, there is a real potential for stranded workers and stranded communities. A just transition will not happen by itself. Many are already being laid off with the downturn in world oil prices and divestment by major players. Workers, their families, and their communities are stressed. It is critical to commit to a transparent, inclusive planning process that includes measures to prevent fear, opposition, and intercommunity and generational conflict. People need to see a future that allows both security and genuine opportunity. With deeper investments in renewable power sources and energy efficiency measures, we need parallel investments in training and retraining.

As Samantha Smith of the Just Transition Centre said in a report to the OECD:

A just transition ensures environmental sustainability as well as decent work, social inclusion and poverty eradication. Indeed, this is what the Paris Agreement requires: National plans on climate change that include just transition measures with a centrality of decent work and quality jobs.

The ILO director general said:

Environmental sustainability is not a job killer, as it is sometimes claimed. On the contrary, if properly managed, it can lead to more and better jobs, poverty reduction and social inclusion.

As early as 2012, the International Energy Agency, in its “World Energy Outlook”, said:

Energy efficiency is widely recognised as a key option in the hands of policy makers but current efforts fall well short of tapping its full economic potential.... [T]ackling the barriers to energy efficiency investment can unleash this potential and realise huge gains for energy security, economic growth and the environment.

I might add, for job creation. Globally, the renewable energy sector employs millions of workers.

Who has been calling for action by the federal government on just transition? At the last two COP gatherings of world leaders on climate, the featured topic for workers and the public was a call for investment in a just transition for workers and communities. (1030)

At the eleventh hour, at the last COP in Berlin, Canada's environment minister was pressured to commit to action. The minister finally, in the third year of the government's mandate, created an advisory committee. The last three budgets have made zero reference to a just transition, and zero dollars have been committed specifically to targeted skills training for the new energy economy.

I will quote the Canadian Labour Congress. It said:

Climate change is real, and its impact on working people and their children will be immense. No amount of wishful thinking will make this challenge disappear, and we have limited time to adapt to changes and prevent further damage....Business-as-usual policies and relying on market incentives will simply not spur this transition with the speed and scale required to avoid catastrophic climate change. And they will certainly not deliver fairness for workers and their communities.

Who are these workers and what are their demands? They are oilfield and gas workers. They are coalfield workers. They work in coal-fired power plants. They are seeking job security in this evolving clean energy economy.

I will share just a couple of those stories, which have been compiled by Energy & Earth.

D. Lee, a unionized trades worker, said:

My work history involves field level oil extraction jobs on drilling rigs and other field services for those drilling rigs. I have become an electrician so that I can participate in the world's energy revolution.

Liam Hildebrand, a boilermaker, said:

I have been a boilermaker for over a decade and have proudly built a number of renewable energy projects with no retraining required. Give us the blueprints and steel and we will help Canada address climate change with our industrial trade skills!

These workers are demanding federal action, but they are not just sitting back, waiting for governments to act. Iron & Earth oil and gas workers partnered with members of the Louis Bull Tribe of Maskwacis in Alberta to train workers to install rooftop panels. Their goal is to up-skill over 1,000 oil, gas, and coal workers, as well as indigenous community members as solar specialists.

We have seen similar successes in T'Sou-ke Nation and other indigenous communities. Iron & Earth, in collaboration with Energy Futures Lab, Pembina Institute, CanGEA, and others have issued a Workers' Climate Plan: Blueprint for Sustainable Jobs and Economy, and have issued a detailed plan, calling on the federal government to revise the pan-Canadian climate strategy to address the needs of workers and to act on the unions' calls for a green economy and skills survey. ECO Canada has existed for decades and is funded at the federal level. It has been doing market analyses on environmental jobs. It would be perfect to lead this work.

In addition, they want research skills gaps filled. They want focused, short-term training programs. They want a workplace training fund. They want an energy manufacturing market analyses. They want support for incubator programs tailored to collaboration between contractors, developers, and unions seeking renewable solutions, like the Energy Futures Lab based in Calgary.

There are concerns that other nations will fill the void if Canada does not step up to the plate and finance this retraining. All of Canada's unions have shown the initiative and willingness to work for it.

Could the federal government at least finally release its regulations to speed up the shutdown of coal-fired power sector? Could the government please now release funds to fuel this workers' fund to...”

Ms. Linda Duncan

June 12th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...

Absolutely, we want to provide jobs for the future. I can read 100 quotes from oil field and coal and gas workers. They want retraining for the new economy when it comes. What happens after the...”

Ms. Kim Rudd (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources, Lib.)

June 12th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“... clean growth. At the same time, we are putting a price on carbon and accelerating the phase out of coal. All of this leads me to think the hon. member opposite wrote his motion by taking a page out o...”

Mr. Earl Dreeshen (Red Deer—Mountain View, CPC)

June 12th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...ssion, especially on clean tech. One of the issues is that there has been a great push to eliminate coal as an energy source. We have some of the cleanest coal operations in the world, and we have the technology that is reducing the greenhouse gases assoc...”

Mr. Lloyd Longfield (Guelph, Lib.)

June 12th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...nt in this discussion. When we look at Ontario in particular, it was important that we came off the coal plant in Nanticoke. We went from 53 smog days in 2005 to virtually no smog days since 2014. Tha...”

Mr. Jamie Schmale

June 12th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...mer Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario, which started the ball rolling on getting rid of the coal-fired power plants right here in Ontario. That is a good news story. I only caution that we all...”

Ms. Sheila Malcolmson (Nanaimo—Ladysmith, NDP)

June 12th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...ver Island University. It is right now building a geothermal project. It is inserting down into old coal mining shafts in our riding. Nanaimo was originally built on coal, so that coal history will now move to geothermal, where they are going to be able to pull from the natural h...”

Mr. Richard Cannings (South Okanagan—West Kootenay, NDP)

June 12th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...ore pollution than we are. Meanwhile, China is going all in on renewable energy, shifting away from coal. It is clearly one of the world leaders in solar technologies, and the Chinese have openly boas...”

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi

June 12th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“... NDP on climate change. It has put a cap on overall emissions from the oil sands. It is phasing out coal. It has put a very effective price on pollution. I hope the federal NDP will support the provin...”

Ms. Elizabeth May (Saanich—Gulf Islands, GP)

June 12th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...pport for solar energy. It is taking off. Solar panels are now a cheaper source of electricity than coal and Canada's Department of Finance actually takes active measures to increase the cost of solar...”

Mr. Nick Whalen (St. John's East, Lib.)

June 12th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“..., including a national network of recharging and refuelling stations; accelerating the phase out of coal; creating a clean fuel standard; regulating methane emissions; making unprecedented investments in foundational science; opening up, for the first time, Canada's offshore to marine renewables, such as wave and offshore wind; developing a $1.5 billion oceans protection plan; and together with our provincial and territorial colleagues, developing a national plan for combatting climate change and investing in clean growth. All told, our government is investing $8 billion in clean energy projects and renewable technologies.

We are doing all of this, not just because it is the right thing to do, but because it is the smart thing to do. We know incredible opportunities lie ahead for those nations that develop the technologies and drive innovation for a more sustainable future.

Bloomberg New Energy Finance expects that more than $5 trillion will be invested in new renewable energy capacity by 2030. The Bank of England Governor, Mark Carney, a good Canadian, calls clean growth a $30 trillion economic opportunity. This is where Canada's economic future lies. This is what the global future demands.

Our government is determined to seize those opportunities by investing today in areas of invention and imagination.

We also know that because climate change is a global issue, global action is required. That is why we were proud to join Mission Innovation as one of its founding members. As the hon. members know, Mission Innovation is a global initiative, comprising 22 nations and the European Union, aimed at accelerating the clean energy revolution. Canada has committed to doubling its funding for clean energy research and development, from $387 million to $775 million by 2020.

One of the most interesting aspects of Mission Innovation is the involvement of the private sector. The Breakthrough Energy Coalition, led by Bill Gates, Richard Branson, and other leading entrepreneurs, is investing in earl...”

Mrs. Deborah Schulte (King—Vaughan, Lib.)

June 12th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...x preferences that support the production of fossil fuels through the extraction of oil and gas and coal. This included the phase-out of the accelerated capital cost allowance for tangible assets in oil sands projects. That was in budget 2007, and its implementation was completed in 2015.

It included lowering the deduction rates for intangible capital expenses in oil sands projects to align with the rates for conventional oil and gas. That was in budget 2011, and its implementation was completed by 2016.

It included the phase-out of the Atlantic investment tax credit for investments in the oil and gas and mining sectors. That was in budget 2012 and was implemented and completed last year, in 2017.

It includes the phase-out of the accelerated capital cost allowance for tangible assets in mines, including coal mines. That was in budget 2013, and its implementation is to be completed by 2021.

It includes the lowering of the deduction rate for pre-production intangible mine development expenses, including for coal mines, to align with the rates for the oil and gas sector. That was in budget 2013, and impleme...”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

June 12th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...what you call leadership on climate change. We are putting a price on pollution, we are phasing out coal, and we are investing in clean technologies. That is what progressive leaders like Rachel Notle...”

Ms. Linda Duncan (Edmonton Strathcona, NDP)

June 12th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...from workers and environmentalists was an advisory group finally struck this spring, but limited to coal workers.

When will the government actually make real investments in a just transition str...”

Hon. Catherine McKenna (Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Lib.)

June 12th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...orkers and with unions. We set up a just transition workforce so that we can support workers in the coal sector so they can transition. We are going to continue doing what we need to do, which is—”

Mrs. Deborah Schulte (King—Vaughan, Lib.)

June 12th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...s many complementary measures to reduce emissions such as accelerating the phase-out of traditional coal-fired electricity, reducing methane, and energy efficiency measures. Some of them we have been ...”

Mr. Robert-Falcon Ouellette (Winnipeg Centre, Lib.)

June 12th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“... could reduce the world's warming by as much as half a degree.

We are phasing out traditional coal-fired power by 2030, with an ambitious goal of attaining 90% of electricity generation from cle...”

Mr. Rodger Cuzner (Cape Breton—Canso, Lib.)

June 11th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...r and protracted strike between the United Mine Workers of America and the British Empire Steel and Coal Company, harsh actions by the company brought the situation to a head.

On this day in 1925, striking coal miners marched to the company's power facility at New Waterford Lake, Cape Breton, in an attempt to have their power and water restored to their town after the company had shut it off. In the crowd of 3,000 was William Davis. Upon arrival, they were met by company police. Tensions rose, and the police fired 300 rounds into the crowd, injuring many, and killing Bill Davis. In the weeks following, company stores were looted and property vandalized. To quell the riots, 2,000 troops were brought in. This remains the second-largest deployment of troops for a domestic conflict in Canadian history, after the North-West Rebellion.

Today, in mining communities across Nova Scotia, people gather to pay tribute to Bill Davis, whose death stands as a symbol of the determination and resilience of Canadian coal miners, and to recognize the sacrifices made by organized labour in building this great country...”

Mr. Jonathan Wilkinson (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Lib.)

June 11th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...limate plan needs to include a range of measures, some of them regulatory, such as the phase-out of coal and methane emissions, and investments in clean technology and investments in infrastructure, b...”

Mr. Jonathan Wilkinson (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Lib.)

June 11th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ly with addressing climate change with substantive proposals that include the accelerated phase out coal, reducing methane emissions, and investments in green infrastructure will enable us to grow a c...”

Mr. Jonathan Wilkinson (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Lib.)

June 8th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...to address climate change and to grow our economy. That is why we are accelerating the phase-out of coal, making historic investments in cleaner infrastructure, and putting in place a price on carbon ...”

Mr. Jonathan Wilkinson (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Lib.)

June 8th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...s exactly what we are doing. We have taken action. We are accelerating the phase-out of traditional coal power. We are making historic investments in clean infrastructure like public transit, and we a...”

Mr. Jonathan Wilkinson (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Lib.)

June 8th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... are taking serious action to improve our economy. That is why we are accelerating the phase-out of coal, investing in green infrastructure, and putting a price on pollution as an environmentally soun...”

Mr. Jonathan Wilkinson (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Lib.)

June 8th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...a comprehensive approach to addressing climate change includes regulatory measures like phasing out coal and reducing methane emissions and includes investments in clean technology and green infrastru...”

Ms. Kim Rudd (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources, Lib.)

June 8th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ship on climate change looks like, and that is why we are putting a price on pollution, phasing out coal, and investing in clean technologies. Progressive leaders like Premier Notley get it, and it is...”

Mr. Jonathan Wilkinson (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Lib.)

June 8th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...e a comprehensive plan, one that addresses regulatory issues, such as accelerating the phase-out of coal, reducing methane emissions, making major investments in green infrastructure, and investments ...”

Mr. Murray Rankin (Victoria, NDP)

June 8th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“Mr. Speaker, Control Arms is the international coalition of some 300 civil society partner organizations in all parts of the world. They campaigned...”

Hon. Catherine McKenna (Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Lib.)

June 7th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...on across the country. We are making historic investments in clean technologies. We are phasing out coal. We are making historic investments in public transportation.

We are going to continue do...”

Hon. Catherine McKenna (Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Lib.)

June 7th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...he previous government, we have stepped up. We are putting a price on pollution, we are phasing out coal, and we are making historic investments in public transportation. In Ottawa, our investments in...”

Hon. Catherine McKenna (Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Lib.)

June 7th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... this day that he supports what the Ontario Liberal government did, which was to actually phase out coal. That was the biggest reduction in greenhouse gas emissions in our country's history.

We know we need to take serious action on climate change by phasing out coal, putting a price on pollution, and making investments in green technology, but once again, as e...”

Mr. Luc Berthold (Mégantic—L'Érable, CPC)

June 5th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...s the United States is moving forward with its plan to reduce regulations, cut taxes, and invest in coal-fired and natural-gas-fired electricity in order to cut energy costs.

Canadian businesses...”

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs (Lakeland, CPC)

June 4th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...nities to self-determination on energy development.

Both the Prime Minister and the left-wing coalition have, of course, been totally complicit in the indigenous anti-energy myth for their own i...”

Mr. Jonathan Wilkinson (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Lib.)

June 4th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...hrough the pan-Canadian framework on clean growth and climate change to accelerate the phase-out of coal, to put methane regulations in place, to promote green infrastructure, and to do a whole range ...”

Hon. Catherine McKenna (Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Lib.)

June 1st
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ramework is now well under way, with good progress already achieved on measures such as phasing out coal-fired power generation by 2030, developing regulations to reduce methane emissions from the oil and gas sector, and introducing a clean fuel standard.

This past June, our government launched the $2-billion low-carbon economy fund to support projects to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. We are also working with provinces and territories to ensure that carbon pricing applies across Canada, including by developing a federal carbon pricing backstop system. (1010) [Translation]

We also continue to work with our international partners to advance global action on climate change. Most recently, at the recent 23rd Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change in Bonn, Canada became a founding member of the Powering Past Coal Alliance, which includes national and subnational governments, businesses, and non-governmental organizations focused on accelerating clean growth and climate protection through the rapid phase-out of traditional coal power.

This past November, Canada also became one of the first countries in the world to ...”

Ms. Marilyn Gladu (Sarnia—Lambton, CPC)

June 1st
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“..., India, Korea, and places like that in the world that want to purchase our oil, they could get off coal. That is a huge advance in reducing the carbon footprint in the world. In addition, Canada is v...”

Hon. Catherine McKenna (Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Lib.)

June 1st
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... has taken serious action on climate change. It has put a price on pollution, and it is phasing out coal. It has also put the first-ever hard cap on emissions in the oil sands. That is how this fits i...”

Ms. Marilyn Gladu

June 1st
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...t it out to China, India, Korea, and some of the developing nations that are currently building 453 coal plants, that would go a long way, as well, in addressing the issue.”

Ms. Marilyn Gladu

June 1st
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ve already talked about how replacing oil in other countries will stop them from building these 453 coal plants that are under construction. That is a huge thing relative to the target agreements we h...”

Hon. Ed Fast

May 31st
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... by regulating the light and heavy vehicle industry. We were the ones who regulated the traditional coal-fired electricity sector. We started the move toward phasing out methane across Canada. All ini...”

Mr. Greg Fergus (Hull—Aylmer, Lib.)

May 29th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... actions they are taking. Environment and Climate Change Canada is working to phase out traditional coal-fired electricity units and advancing the use of carbon pricing. Global Affairs Canada is deliv...”

Mr. Robert Sopuck (Dauphin—Swan River—Neepawa, CPC)

May 29th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... a unique analysis of sulphur dioxide. In the early 1900s, sulphur dioxide was being belched out of coal-fired power plants at a furious rate that caused the great smogs. People said they did not care about the environment. The whole point was to industrialize and to use those power plants to power an ever-growing society.

What happened in the early seventies, however, is that people said that enough was enough, because of acid rain and air pollution. They simply could not put up with that. Society changed dramatically. Technology was developed to put scrubbers in coal-fired power plants. Starting in the 1970s, sulphur dioxide emissions declined dramatically in t...”

Mr. Vance Badawey (Niagara Centre, Lib.)

May 29th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ating electricity from new solar cells will be lower than the projected operating costs of existing coal-fired power plants. In 2017, Germany generated 36% of its electricity with clean energy. Last year, our southern neighbours saw solar and wind industries create jobs 12 times faster than the rest of the economy. In fact, they have twice as many solar jobs as coal jobs. Finally, here in our great nation, wind energy in Prince Edward Island reduces its need for energy from outside the province. P.E.I. has no sources of oil, natural gas, or other fuels for traditional forms of electricity.

As the world's economies are shifting toward cleaner and more sustainable growth, it is essential that Canada remain competitive on the world stage.

Sustainable development includes supporting people and the nation toward a cleaner economy, which will help position Canada to take advantage of opportunities in the new global economy by diversifying our economy and opening up access to new marks while reducing emissions and generating good jobs for all Canadians.

Sustainable development includes clean technologies, which are a key component of our government's approach to promoting sustainable economic growth. I want to emphasize the word “sustainable”. It is not just about economic growth, but economic growth that is done right and sustainably.

Among many things, sustainable development means tackling climate change. Canada was one of almost 200 countries that committed to the Paris Agreement. We agreed to take steps to support the transition to a low-carbon economy and limit the global temperature increase to less than 2° Celsius.

Together with our provincial and territorial partners, we developed a pan-Canadian framework on clean growth and climate change, which includes our approach to pricing carbon pollution and measures to achieve reductions across all sectors of our economy. We see carbon pricing as a key driver for technological innovation and helping Canada to transition to a low-carbon economy, because a carbon price creates a continuous incentive to develop innovative and inexpensive ways to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

A transition to a lower-carbon future will also require the involvement of the private sector to help increase the supply from alternative sources of energy, meet increasing demands while reducing greenhouse gas emissions, leverage investments in clean energy, improve energy interconnection, and ensure a smooth transition as Canada reduces its reliance on coal.

Our goal is to make Canada a world leader in green technology and clean innovation. That...”

Mr. Wayne Stetski (Kootenay—Columbia, NDP)

May 28th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...ed....

This idea is a winner and should be supported.

The Surrey/White Rock Food Action Coalition wrote:

Focusing attention on healthy, high-quality locally grown food will support o...”

Ms. Hélène Laverdière (Laurier—Sainte-Marie, NDP)

May 28th
Hansard Link

Points of Order

“...ing that this is a botched bill and it should be thrown out. Project Ploughshares, the Control Arms Coalition, and the Rideau Institute, to name just a few, all agree that this bill does not reflect t...”

Hon. Hunter Tootoo (Nunavut, Ind.)

May 28th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...pproach will not work.

Will the minister engage in further consultations, as requested by the Coalition of Canadian Airlines, and work with them to achieve a mutually acceptable solution that wo...”

Mr. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, CPC)

May 25th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...peaker, the Minister of Environment and Climate Change unveiled her panel for a just transition for coal workers and communities. Out of the 11 task force members, only one represents a coal community, yet the Liberals appointed a donor to the Prime Minister's leadership campaign to chair the panel. Only one community representative for all four provinces? This is not consultation. It is a sham.

Why is the government stacking a task force with Liberal donors instead of appointing members who actually understand coal workers and their communities?”

Hon. Catherine McKenna (Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Lib.)

May 25th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, we understand that phasing out coal is good for our health, our climate, and our kids. It is one of the most important steps we can...”

Mr. Robert Kitchen (Souris—Moose Mountain, CPC)

May 25th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, the environment minister announced a just transition for coal workers and communities task force without notifying the mayors of the communities its decisions will affect.

Nine out of 11 members on the task force are from large urban centres. One is an expert on tidal technology. Do they know where the Prairies are? None has lived in a coal mining community in my province. They cannot understand the way of life, as they have never liv...”

Hon. Catherine McKenna (Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Lib.)

May 25th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... working with business, and to working with provincial governments. We need to do this. Phasing out coal is critical to tackling climate change. Almost 800,000 people die each year from pollution.

...”

Mr. Brad Trost (Saskatoon—University, CPC)

May 24th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... places like Europe, which was having massive problems with deforestation, the Europeans brought in coal technology. The market brought it in to replace wood for energy. They began to use things like the market mechanisms to move food around the world. Ships that were run by oil, diesel, fuels, and coal were able to take food from parts of the world, such as North America, Europe, and various other places, and move it around.

How did that help the environment? Very simply, instead of local areas having to use their marginal resources to produce food, they were able to bring it from different parts of the world by using market mechanisms.

Technology has also helped to improve the environment. One of the ironies of the expanding debate around fracking and tight shale and different things about that, is these technologies have helped to create a greater supply of natural gas, lowering the price for natural gas which then replaces coal. I am no critic of the coal industry, but natural gas, when it is used for electricity, produces less greenhouse gases than coal. (1130)

Here is the irony. Petroleum engineers, through free enterprise, have done more to cut greenhouse gases than all the government regulations proposed by the various left-wing regimes around the world. If we look at the other place in the world, where there were major cuts to greenhouse gases, it was after the collapse of the Soviet communist bloc in Eastern Europe. They got rid of the heavy industry that was subsidized by the socialist-communist regimes of Eastern Europe. That was why the European Union was able to claim such massive credits. However, the irony of it all, for all the talk about regulation and taxation that the Liberal government puts forward, is that free enterprise and capitalism have actually done more for the environment than anything else. This is not surprising when we look at what people take responsibility for. They take responsibility for their own actions and their own property.

I used to live in the former Soviet Union for a short while as it was transitioning to becoming the various republics and independent nations it is now. I could see, as was to be expected, that people had environmental respect of their own property. However, the broader collectively-owned property did not. Free enterprise, responsibility, and all those basic things work to help protect the environment.

If we look at what the current government is doing, it has not been following those historical patterns. It has not looked at what broadly works to integrate with human nature to do it. Its ultimate policy is to do things like Bill C-57, which is about process, more talking, more reports, and more people being appointed to more committees to get more per diems and more payments, and so forth. Unfortunately that all tends to lead to more taxes and more regulation. The whole drive of the Liberal Party's environmental policy is to tax more and more.

What do people naturally do when they are taxed more? They do not necessarily change their behaviour in regard to the environment. They would if it were their own property and they needed to preserve and protect it. They do what people naturally should do. They try to avoid these carbon taxes.

I worked with the Saskatchewan Mining Association, which has been trying to communicate with the Minister of Environment, and not all that successfully I might add. However, it is very clear that it wants to work and do the best job it can for the environment. However, if the government overtaxes it with carbon taxes and regulations that have no basis in reality, its investment will move. Therefore, we do not actually clean up the environment. We do not actually have a better environmental outcome. What we do when we put on these carbon taxes and other regulations that are unnecessary for environmental improvement is that we move the industrial activity, hurt the Canadian economy, and do nothing to improve the environment.

If we tax electric plants in Canada that are generated by coal and we tax them so they move from Saskatchewan to North Dakota, all we have done is kill econom...”

Mr. Jim Eglinski (Yellowhead, CPC)

May 24th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...tandards in the world, and we produce the cleanest energy, regardless of what it is, whether it is coal, oil, or gas. We have such strong, stringent regulations that we should be proud of that fact.<...”

Mr. Robert Aubin (Trois-Rivières, NDP)

May 11th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...that the existing electoral system should no longer be used in our society.

Québec solidaire, Coalition Avenir Québec, the Parti Québécois, and the Green Party of Quebec joined forces to say tha...”

Mr. Erin Weir (Regina—Lewvan, Ind.)

May 10th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...ommonwealth Federation went on to adopt its policy manifesto in Regina. The CCF was a farmer-labour coalition.

A current issue that engages farm and labour interests is the elimination of the Sa...”

Hon. Kevin Sorenson (Battle River—Crowfoot, CPC)

May 10th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“Mr. Speaker, coal-fired electricity and coal mining have been a mainstay of many regional economies in Alberta over the last 60 years. Forestburg and Hanna, two important communities in my riding, are perfect examples. Sixty percent of Forestburg's economy is based on the coal industry, with many employed at either the Battle River mine or the power plant. Hanna's econom...”

Mr. Matt DeCourcey (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs, Lib.)

May 10th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...her leaders on the African continent recently as well. We are also the co-chair of the Equal Rights Coalition, and we will host a global conference that will help advocate for better protection and pr...”

Hon. Erin O'Toole (Durham, CPC)

May 9th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...rder controls in this country. This is due to inaction, due to the desire to keep their centre left coalition alive. They will not even do the basic enforcement of border rules and regulations. It is ...”

Ms. Kim Rudd (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources, Lib.)

May 9th
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“...022. This is as much as taking 23 million to 26 million cars off the road or shutting down 20 to 23 coal-fired power plants for a year. It also shows that carbon pricing reduces pollution without hurt...”

Hon. Pierre Poilievre (Carleton, CPC)

May 8th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“..., if not most, provinces, electricity is produced by some form of fossil fuel, whether natural gas, coal fire, or some other source that would be affected by this carbon tax. Even people taking transi...”

Mr. Jonathan Wilkinson (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Lib.)

May 8th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“... investments in public transit, green infrastructure, and clean innovation. It includes phasing out coal, improving energy efficiency, and cutting methane emissions from the oil and gas sector.

As published in December 2017 in Canada's third biennial report to the United Nations, Canada's GHG emissions are projected to be 232 megatonnes lower than expected in the report released in early 2016. This decline in projected emissions is the biggest improvement in Canada's emissions outlook since reporting began, and is directly a product of the pan-Canadian framework.

Moreover, this improvement is widespread across all economic sectors, reflecting the smart, practical outcomes that can be achieved by a thoughtful, comprehensive approach to protecting the environment and growing the economy.[Translation]

Let us consider what our plan has achieved so far. Greenhouse gas emissions are falling. Over 600,000 jobs, most of them full time, have been created since this government was elected. Canada's unemployment rate is at its lowest level in nearly 40 years. Since 2016, Canada has led the G7 in economic growth. Lastly, the federal debt-to-GDP ratio, which is our national debt relative to our economy, is on a downward track and is set to reach its lowest level in nearly 40 years. In short, greenhouse gas emissions in Canada are falling , while the economy is booming.[English]

We know that this approach, investing in growth that strengthens and grows the middle class and helps those working hard to join it, is exactly the right thing for Canadians.

A core element of our approach to lowering emissions and ensuring a healthier environment is the polluter pays principle. When pollution has a price, polluting less saves money. Individuals and companies make cleaner choices.

Experts around the world, including the vast majority of Canadian economists, agree that carbon pricing is one of the most cost-effective ways to reduce emissions. It provides companies and individuals with the freedom to make their own decisions on how to best cut their emissions.

A price on carbon works because it creates a powerful incentive to cut pollution, encouraging people and businesses to make different choices that save them money, like better insulating their homes or upgrading to more energy-efficient equipment.

There are also long-term financial benefits of transitioning to a cleaner economy, and many benefits that may flow from new technologies and innovations that are driven by carbon pricing. As some of Canada's largest employers have pointed out, putting a price on carbon pollution is just good business. It is already helping to build a clean growth economy and make Canadian businesses more innovative and more competitive.

Canada's five major banks, along with many companies in the consumer goods, energy, and resource development sectors, support putting a price on carbon, as do members of the Carbon Pricing Leadership Coalition, which includes 32 national and subnational governments, 150 businesses, and 67 strategic partners working to support and accelerate carbon pricing around the world.

Canada is creating the business environment that will strengthen the growth of a clean economy. Canada already has many success stories of businesses that are innovating. For example, CarbonCure is a business that takes carbon dioxide that would otherwise pollute and adds it to concrete. The result is less climate pollution and stronger, greener concrete. It is a win-win. Solar Vision Inc. is a company based in Quebec that provides solar lighting technologies. Enerkem takes Edmonton non-recyclable waste and turns it into commonly used fuels and chemicals. Agrisoma Biosciences Inc. is a biotech firm based in Gatineau. It is expanding low-carbon options in the biofuel industry by turning seeds into jet fuel. These and other businesses like them see the opportunity for clean growth. They see that technology can be part of the climate solution and will also be profitable and a source of good jobs.

This is an area in which I have a reasonable amount of personal experience. Prior to running for office, I spent 20 years as a chief executive officer and an executive in the clean technology space in British Columbia.

In B.C., climate action that includes a price on pollution has never come at the expense of economic progress. In fact, just the opposite is true. Over the past decade, B.C.'s carbon tax has reduced emissions by between 5% and 15%. Meanwhile, provincial GDP grew by more than 17% in the same period. Further, B.C.'s price on carbon pollution has stimulated a robust, growing clean technology sector that now brings in an estimated $1.7 billion in annual revenue. The pricing of carbon pollution that was implemented through the leadership of former premier Gordon Campbell has resulted in B.C. having the largest and most robust clean tech hub in the country, and one of the most robust worldwide. (1050) [Translation]

Similar results are being seen in California, where a cap-and-trade system has been reducing greenhouse gas emissions while fuelling one of the strongest economic growth rates in the United States. Sweden has one of the highest carbon prices in the world, and it is showing strong economic growth and falling emissions.[English]

In 2017, B.C., Alberta, Ontario, and Quebec, the four provinces with carbon pollution pricing systems in place, were the top four performers in GDP growth across Canada. Obviously, that is the result of a number of factors, but pricing carbon is clearly one of them. Anyone who says carbon pricing hurts economies is not basing his or her argument on the evidence. Pricing pollution has a track record of success in Canada and all over the world. It helped us to tackle problems like acid rain while supporting clean growth and innovation. A price on carbon is already in effect in nearly half the world.

By giving businesses and households an incentive to innovate more and pollute less, we are fulfilling our commitment to invest in growth while respecting and helping to protect our environment. Even some members of the Conservative caucus agree. On B.C.'s price on pollution, the Conservative environment critic stated that British Columbia, “did the right thing”. On Manitoba's climate plan, which includes a price on pollution, the member for Dauphin—Swan River—Neepawa said, “I think it's a very, very smart plan.” The member for Wellington—Halton Hills said, “We have a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to both lower income taxes and clean up our environment through the pricing of carbon.”

Last week, Environment and Climate Change Canada released a report that provided further evidence of the economic and environmental opportunities associated with putting a price on carbon. The study found that carbon pricing would reduce carbon pollution by up to 90 million tonnes across Canada in 2022. That is like shutting down more than 20 coal-fired power plants. Carbon pricing will make a substantial contribution to Canada's 2030 target...”

Mr. Jonathan Wilkinson

May 8th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...fore a very important metric and is part of actually getting there, in addition to the phase-out of coal, methane regulations, low-carbon fuel standards, and building efficiency, etc.

If the Con...”

Mr. Jonathan Wilkinson (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Lib.)

May 8th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...e House applaud. The pan-Canadian framework includes a whole range of initiatives: the phase-out of coal, methane reductions from the oil and gas base, green infrastructure, the low-carbon fuel standa...”

Mr. Nick Whalen (St. John's East, Lib.)

May 8th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...rogress.

There is yet another group calling for carbon pricing, the Carbon Pricing Leadership Coalition, which has joined with the World Bank to bring together leaders from across government, th...”

Mr. Nick Whalen

May 8th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...or an oil furnace, and whether they encourage their government to adopt clean energy initiatives or coal-fired power plants, adopting the price will drive societal change toward a reduction in carbon....”

Hon. Catherine McKenna (Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Lib.)

May 8th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“... equivalent of taking between 23 million and 26 million cars off the road for a year, or closing 20 coal-fired plants. Already, over 80% of Canadians live in a province that has a price on carbon pollution: Quebec, Ontario, Alberta, and British Columbia. Last year, these provinces led the country in economic growth.

The time for politics is over. Taking action on climate change should not be a partisan issue, but, sadly, that is what the Conservatives are making it. Through our made-in-Canada climate plan, we are pricing carbon pollution, phasing out coal-fired electricity, and investing in public transit, green infrastructure, and clean technologie...”

Ms. Kim Rudd (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources, Lib.)

May 8th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...overnment takes climate change seriously by signing the Paris accord; accelerating the phase-out of coal; creating a low-carbon fuel standard; regulating methane emissions; making unprecedented invest...”

Ms. Kim Rudd

May 8th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“... change.

The member asked what other things we can do or are doing. One is the elimination of coal. As we know, it is one of the elements of our energy system that produces significant emissions...”

Ms. Kim Rudd

May 8th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...nd his party are trying to take credit for something that happened in Ontario with the phase-out of coal-fired plants. Nuclear power represents over 60% of the electricity generation in Ontario.

The elimination of the coal-fired plants has seen a reduction of visits of children with asthma at Ontario hospitals. It ha...”

Mr. Randy Hoback (Prince Albert, CPC)

May 4th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...s want to shut down the resource sector. We are hearing stories now that they want to shut down the coal sector. In Saskatchewan, we have carbon capture off our coal power plants. With this technology, those power plants have five times less emissions than natural gas. However, the Liberals say, “Let us get rid of coal.” What does that mean? Is that really crazy? I think so.

If there is technology to make coal clean and to reduce its carbon footprint, why would we not embrace the new technology and still...”

Mr. Randy Hoback

May 4th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...hat is a wise approach. However, the Liberals are not doing that here. They are not doing that with coal, for example. They are just getting rid of it. They are saying that there is no technology, so ...”

Mrs. Kelly Block (Carlton Trail—Eagle Creek, CPC)

May 3rd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...by all but one member of the Senate Transport and Communications Committee, was also supported by a coalition of eight captive shipper industry associations.

The amendment would have increased d...”

Hon. Catherine McKenna (Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Lib.)

May 3rd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ions only went down twice under the previous government: one, because the Ontario government closed coal-fired plants, and the Conservatives cannot take credit—

Some hon. members: Oh, oh!”

Hon. Catherine McKenna

May 3rd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, let me continue. One, emissions went down because the Ontario government phased out coal. The Conservatives cannot take credit for that. Actually, they can take credit for a recession ...”

Hon. Catherine McKenna (Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Lib.)

May 1st
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...ing between 23 million and 26 million cars off the road for a year, or the equivalent of closing 20 coal-fired plants. Without a doubt, pricing carbon pollution is making a major contribution to helping Canada meet its climate targets under the Paris Agreement.

Pricing pollution is not only effective; it also strengthens our economy. Take British Columbia. It put a price on carbon pollution more than a decade ago, and since 2007, it has reduced emissions by between 5% and 15%, while provincial real GDP grew by more than 17% from 2007 to 2015.

Today over 80% of Canadians live in a province that already has a price on pollution—in Quebec, Ontario, Alberta, and British Columbia—and last year these provinces led the country in economic growth.

Carbon pricing is the approach that economists overwhelmingly recommend. In fact, it is the policy that over 30 governments and 150 leading businesses have come together to support through the international Carbon Pricing Leadership Coalition. This group includes Canada's major banks, alongside Canadian companies in the consumer goods, energy, and resource development sectors. Steve Williams, the CEO of Suncor, Canada's largest oil producer, put it this way: “We think climate change is happening. We think a broad-based carbon price is the right answer.”

Around the world, governments are realizing the efficiency and effectiveness of pricing carbon pollution. Today some 40 countries, including Canada, are pricing carbon pollution, and more governments are planning to implement similar systems soon.

According to the World Bank, a price on pollution covers nearly half of the world's economy today. China recently launched the world's largest carbon pricing system, and last year Ontario, Quebec, and California signed an agreement to create the world's second-largest carbon market. A carbon price works best when people and businesses find ways not to pay it by investing in clean solutions to save money. This is not about raising money; it is about sending the right signals to spur clean innovation.

We have been clear that any revenue will remain in the province and territory it comes from. Provided they meet the federal standard, our approach gives provinces and territories the flexibility to design their own systems and to decide how best to use the revenues from pricing pollution to support families and businesses and to strengthen a clean growth economy. Alberta, British Columbia, Ontario, and Quebec are reinvesting the revenues in their own provinces through measures such as targeted rebates or tax cuts to households and businesses, investments in public transit, clean technology solutions, and home retrofit programs that help families and businesses save money.

These investments are already making a big difference for Canadians. They are creating good jobs, supporting cleaner growth, and driving investments in cities and communities. Importantly, governments can and should design their own carbon pricing systems to avoid putting extra financial pressure on low-income and middle-class households. For example, provinces can choose to provide money-back rebates, to cut taxes, or to fund discounts on technologies that help people save money on energy bills. Governments in Canada are already making those kinds of choices.

British Columbia's carbon price system has a tax credit for low-income groups. It helps many offset the cost of that province's carbon price through direct payments to low-earning families. By cutting personal or corporate taxes, B.C. also returns revenues from its carbon tax to households and small businesses.

I am very proud that our government is taking the steps to price pollution across the country. The evidence from at home and around the world is extraordinarily strong. It shows that pricing pollution creates good middle-class jobs and gives families and businesses an incentive to make choices that will help them save energy and money. Canadians expect a healthy environment and a growing economy, and that is exactly what we are doing right. (1055) [Translation]

In Alberta, about 60% of households receive full or partial rebates to compensate for the cost of the carbon tax. Families whose income in less than $95,000 a year receive a full rebate. Putting a price on pollution can protect families from the net costs. It helps reduce pollution and sets Canada up for success in the global transition to cleaner growth. The environment and the economy go together. Canadians expect a healthy environment and a growing economy, and that is exactly what we are doing right.[English]

For too long in Canada and elsewhere, cynics have worked hard to stall action on climate change. Some have failed to see the enormous opportunity before us, while others simply refuse to acknowledge that climate change is real. However, the time for inaction is over, and that is why Canada is leading during the clean growth century.

Part of our plan is pricing carbon pollution, but it involves so much more. Mark Carney, the governor of the Bank of England and a great Canadian, put it best when he said, “The point is that the more we invest with foresight, the less we will regret in hindsight.” According to the World Bank, the Paris Agreement will help us open up nearly $23 trillion in new opportunities for climate-smart investments in Canada and emerging markets around the world between now and 2030.

With that in mind, let me lay out other parts of our climate plan, which together will not only reduce carbon pollution but will also renew our infrastructure, strengthen our transportation networks, and, through smart and strategic investments, spur clean innovation and opportunity in Canada's towns and cities.

We are investing $21.9 billion in green infrastructure to build energy-efficient homes and offices and help families save on their energy bills. We are investing $20.1 billion to support urban public transit to help reduce commute times in our cities, to increase the use of clean transportation, and allow Canadians to spend more time with their families and less time in traffic. [Translation]

We are going to phase out coal-fired electricity by 2030. This will help prevent 260 premature deaths, 40,000 fewer asthma episodes, and 190,000 fewer days of breathing difficulty and reduced activity, providing health benefits of $1.2 billion during the regulated period. With the help of an expert task force, we will make sure the transition is a fair one for Canadian workers and communities that depend on coal.

We are implementing a clean fuel standard to encourage Canadians to use cleaner fuels, a...”

Mr. Alexandre Boulerice (Rosemont—La Petite-Patrie, NDP)

May 1st
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...greenhouse gas emissions. There are other areas where pricing is possible. British Columbia has had coal pricing for a decade now. Let us look into what that means for the people of British Columbia, ...”

Ms. Anne Minh-Thu Quach (Salaberry—Suroît, NDP)

May 1st
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...ating jobs. However, Canada does not encourage them. Céline Bak, from the Canadian Clean Technology Coalition, said that 20% of workers in the renewable energy sector were under the age of 30. Job gro...”

Mrs. Cheryl Gallant (Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke, CPC)

May 1st
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...hows no signs of decreasing its emissions anytime soon. China is currently building hundreds of new coal-fired plants, which will ensure its CO2 emissions continue to rise for decades to come. Taken t...”

Mr. Nick Whalen (St. John's East, Lib.)

May 1st
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“... 2022. That is the same as taking 26 million cars off the road a year or shutting down more than 20 coal plants.

Carbon pricing will make a substantial contribution to Canada's 2030 target, but it is not the only thing we are doing to cut emissions. Canada's climate plan includes many other measures that work together with carbon pricing to reduce emissions. Pricing carbon pollution is one of the key actions being taken to put Canada on a course to meet its 2030 targets in combination with a complementary clean growth measure under Canada's clean growth climate action plan.

In addition to pricing carbon, the federal government is making other significant investments to help Canadian businesses and workers participate in the $1 trillion in opportunities offered by the world's transition to a clean growth economy. In June 2017, we launched a low-carbon economic leadership fund to leverage investments in provinces and territories in projects that will support clean growth and reduce greenhouse gas emissions from buildings, industries, forestry, and agriculture. We launched a low-carbon economy challenge in March that will provide more than $500 million for projects that will generate clean growth and reduce carbon pollution. Provinces, territories, businesses, municipalities, not-for-profit organizations, and indigenous communities can apply. I cannot wait to see the types of brilliant ideas that Canadians will bring forward, including those from the Happy City St. John's project which received over 1,000 recommendations in the first 10 days of its #SmartCityYYT initiative.

The Government of Canada is also investing billions in green infrastructure and public transit and, through the Canada Infrastructure Bank, in green bonds from Export Development Canada which are using innovative financing mechanisms to support climate investments and help new technologies become mainstream. Business owners already know that pricing carbon makes sense. According to a report from the carbon disclosure project, the number of companies with internal plans to price their own carbon pollution shot up between 2014 and 2017 from 150 to almost 1,400. The list includes more than 100 of the world's largest companies with total annual revenues of $7 trillion. It just makes sense.

Canada's five major banks, along with many companies in the consumer goods, energy, and resource development sectors, also support putting a price on pollution as members of the Carbon Pricing Leadership Coalition, which includes 32 national and subnational governments, 150 businesses, and 67 strategic partners globally working to support and accelerate carbon pricing around the world. (1220)

A recent study ranked Canada first in the G20 and fourth in the world as a clean technology innovator, up from seventh place in 2014. Last year, 11 of Canada's clean-tech companies ranked in the top 100 worldwide.

Companies such as Winnipeg's Farmers Edge are developing cutting-edge technologies that help farmers waste less energy and increase their profits. St. John's start-up, Mysa, makes a sleek, smart thermostat that links up smart phones to help Canadians save money and make their homes more comfortable. Power HV, a new company incubated at the Genesis Centre, supported by ACOA and Memorial University in my hometown, has created a more efficient, smart bushing that could save 20 tonnes of carbon equivalency per year, if used in electrical transmission. Other innovators are working nationwide to seize this opportunity to protect our environment, create new businesses, create new middle-class jobs, and help our industries compete globally.

According to the World Bank, jurisdictions representing about half the global economy are putting a price on carbon. That does not include China's national system, announced late last year, and which I mentioned earlier in the debate. Our approach is going to ensure that Canadians are well placed to benefit from the opportunities created by the global transition that is currently under way.

Carbon pricing is the most effective way to reduce emissions. It creates incentives for businesses and households to innovate and pollute less. Carbon pricing brings down emissions while driving investment in energy efficiency and in cleaner, less polluting energy sources up.

Our approach is that a clean environment and a strong economy go hand in hand. That is what we are doing every day to help protect our kids, our grandkids, and to help Canadians prosper. The party opposite does not share that vision. That party spent a decade ragging the puck on climate action, and notwithstanding what the member for Sherwood Park—Fort Saskatchewan said, taking credit for a recession or for Ontario's coal reduction is not really emblematic of what that party did on climate change. Canadians deserve ...”

Mr. Nick Whalen

May 1st
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...cession, initiatives were also taken by individual provinces, such as Ontario with the reduction of coal.

With respect to the issue at hand regarding setting the targets in order to meet our goa...”

Mr. Adam Vaughan (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Families, Children and Social Development (Housing and Urban Affairs), Lib.)

May 1st
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“... their term in office. However, there were two things that did that. One was Ontario getting out of coal and reducing the coal particulate in the air, which was hugely beneficial and has had massive savings for the health ...”

Ms. Pam Goldsmith-Jones (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of International Trade, Lib.)

May 1st
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“... million cars off the road for a year. To put it in context, our government's decision to phase out coal-fired electricity, a very important step to protect the health of Canadians as well as to address climate change, is estimated to cut carbon pollution by 16 million tonnes in 2030. Our analysis finds that pricing carbon pollution will deliver five times the reductions of phasing out coal.

Our carbon pricing study also found that growth would remain strong with a nationwide price on carbon pollution. Canada's GDP is expected to grow by about 2% a year between now and 2022 without carbon pricing.

Pricing pollution is a win for the environment and for the economy. It is the approach that economists overwhelmingly recommend. It is the policy that over 30 governments and 150 businesses have come together to support through the international Carbon Pricing Leadership Coalition, a group that includes Canada's five major banks alongside Canadian companies in the consumer goods, energy, and resource development sectors, and yet members of the party opposite said that they plan to reach our Paris Agreement targets without putting a price on carbon. This makes absolutely no sense, and it most certainly does not reflect a sound risk management approach or a vision for Canada's innovation economy.

Acting on climate change is a shared responsibility. Our government has developed Canada's clean growth and climate action plan in partnership with provinces, territories, and indigenous peoples. Provinces have been leaders in pricing pollution when the federal government under former prime minister Harper was afraid to act. I am particularly proud, of course, of British Columbia's leadership in this regard, and I recall a decade of absolutely no support whatsoever, in fact, regression, on the part of the federal government at that time.

Our pan-Canadian approach to pricing carbon intends to ensure a level playing field on carbon pricing across the country. The approach will expand the application of carbon already in place in Canada's four largest provinces to the rest of Canada. Right now, four out of five Canadians live in jurisdictions that are already pricing carbon. Those four provinces, Ontario, Quebec, Alberta, and British Columbia, are also the provinces that led the country in economic growth last year.

Under Canada's clean growth and climate action plan, revenues from pricing pollution will always be returned to the province or territory they come from. If a province or territory adopts its own carbon pricing system that meets the federal standard, that jurisdiction will decide how to use the revenues. In B.C. today, for instance, carbon pricing revenues fund tax cuts for small businesses and households. In Alberta, the revenues support rebates to families, action to phase out coal, and investment in energy efficiency. In Ontario, revenues from carbon pricing support clean en...”

Ms. Pam Goldsmith-Jones

May 1st
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...ns along with putting a price on carbon pollution. We are accelerating the phase-out of traditional coal power. We are making historic investments in cleaner infrastructures, including what works best...”

Mr. T.J. Harvey (Tobique—Mactaquac, Lib.)

April 30th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...Seniors issues are currently at a high point. The Canadian Medical Association, the Canadian Health Coalition and other advocates are pushing for a national seniors strategy, one which would include h...”

Ms. Cheryl Hardcastle (Windsor—Tecumseh, NDP)

April 30th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“... and voluntary. In 1996 she was founder of the national umbrella group the Disability Rights Action Coalition for Housing, which gives me a lot of information that is informative in my advocacy work. ...”

Mr. Tom Kmiec (Calgary Shepard, CPC)

April 30th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...s all across Canada depend either on energy or natural resources jobs.

When oil, natural gas, coal, or any type of mineral is extracted, it has to be moved to a market. It does no good to sit on...”

Hon. Jim Carr (Minister of Natural Resources, Lib.)

April 30th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...e change. We listened and we heard Canadians. Our plan would cut pollution equivalent to closing 20 coal plants, while the economy and the GDP continue to grow in cleaner ways. That is the plan Canadi...”

Mr. Churence Rogers (Bonavista—Burin—Trinity, Lib.)

April 30th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...tion of any serious climate plan, cutting pollution in a way that is equivalent to shutting down 20 coal plants. Can the parliamentary secretary share with this House the positive impacts our plan to ...”

Ms. Brigitte Sansoucy (Saint-Hyacinthe—Bagot, NDP)

April 27th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...bec, are some of the organizations that come to mind. Since I am from Quebec, I would point out the Coalition québécoise pour le contrôle du tabac, which does exemplary work on smoking prevention and ...”

Mr. Steven MacKinnon (Gatineau, Lib.)

April 27th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...such meetings as the Payments Canada Summit in Toronto, organized by the National Trade Contractors Coalition of Canada, and the annual meeting between the government and the Canadian Construction Ass...”

Mrs. Shannon Stubbs (Lakeland, CPC)

April 27th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Madam Speaker, yesterday the B.C. NDP-Green coalition started a court reference to restrict the flow of oil through the province. The Prime Mini...”

Ms. Brigitte Sansoucy

April 27th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“.... We have to listen to front-line stakeholders. In my speech, I mentioned organizations such as the Coalition québécoise pour le contrôle du tabac, Physicians for a Smoke-Free Canada, the Canadian Med...”

Mr. Robert Aubin (Trois-Rivières, NDP)

April 25th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...plain why the Liberals backtracked on changing our electoral system, since the idea of working in a coalition appears to be completely foreign to the Liberal Party.

In its electoral proposals, d...”

Mr. Matt DeCourcey (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs, Lib.)

April 19th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...anadians. We have appointed a special adviser on LGBTQ2 issues. We are co-chairing the Equal Rights Coalition, which is advocating for the rights of the LBGTQ2 community abroad. We have prioritized LG...”

Hon. Marc Garneau (Minister of Transport, Lib.)

April 16th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... commodities they carry that are so important for Canadians: forestry products, potash, containers, coal, minerals, and all those other products as well.”

Mr. Dane Lloyd (Sturgeon River—Parkland, CPC)

March 22nd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...urs every day gathering biomass fuel that wreaks devastation on forests and burns even dirtier than coal. Biomass pollution harms the health of women and children. Canada has a solution, natural gas, ...”

Ms. Sheila Malcolmson (Nanaimo—Ladysmith, NDP)

March 19th
Hansard Link

Routine Proceedings

“...we have ever seen before. Establishing five new anchorages in this sensitive area to export Wyoming coal to China is a poor decision. They again urge the transport minister to reject the application i...”

Hon. Catherine McKenna (Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Lib.)

March 2nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...rnment, we have stepped up. We have put a price on pollution across the country. We have phased out coal. We have made historic investments in clean technology, innovation that is going to make a real...”

Hon. Catherine McKenna (Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Lib.)

March 2nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...g Canadians together on climate action. We are putting a price on pollution, and we are phasing out coal. We are making historic investments in public transit, on energy efficient social housing, on i...”

Mr. Guy Caron (Rimouski-Neigette—Témiscouata—Les Basques, NDP)

February 27th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, on Friday, during the Prime Minister's disastrous trip, the #taxfairness coalition left him a gift, Alain Deneault's book, Canada - A New Tax Haven. It should help him to un...”

Mrs. Marilène Gill (Manicouagan, BQ)

February 27th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...year, the government stands idly by watching them fall into that gap. In eastern Quebec, however, a coalition of elected representatives, unemployed workers' associations, unions, and businesses has taken shape. I am part of that coalition, a coalition that will not be ignored, a coalition united in demanding two things: emergency measures and an immediate and permanent solution...”

Mr. Brian Masse (Windsor West, NDP)

February 26th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...a more equal Canada. He was a leader in every sense and was a founding member of the National Black Coalition.

Howard was an incredible orator, equal to anyone who was ever to sit in this chambe...”

Mr. Martin Shields (Bow River, CPC)

February 26th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...er, the government has failed Canadian grain farmers with Bill C-49. According to Ag Transportation Coalition, CN and CP supplied only a combined 38% of hopper cars ordered in grain week 29. Week 29 w...”

Mr. Guy Caron (Rimouski-Neigette—Témiscouata—Les Basques, NDP)

February 26th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, while the Prime Minister was embroiled in this fiasco last week, the coalition against tax havens was trying to meet with the Minister of Revenue.

No such luck for...”

Mr. Jamie Schmale (Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, CPC)

February 12th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...mployment during the project development and operation.

Last week the B.C. government, an NDP coalition held thinly together by Green Party members, put the rest of Canada on notice that there would be no oil heading west to tidewater. The Prime Minister reacted to this news by telling us that this was a disagreement between provinces. It has nothing to do with the federal government, he said, and off he went to the United States, abandoning Alberta and B.C. to work it out among themselves. With tens of thousands of jobs on the line and billions of dollars in revenue, Alberta's premier put it best when she told the Prime Minister that this is not a debate between B.C. and Alberta, that this is a debate between B.C. and Canada.

The Minister of Natural Resources said that B.C. can launch further consultations but he assured Canadians that they need to be done in a timely fashion, words that no doubt are inspiring confidence throughout the oil and gas industry, and please note my sarcasm. One might think that the oil and gas industry should adopt a wait and see approach. Perhaps the opposition should simply let things work themselves out, as suggested by the Prime Minister.

One only needs to look at the track record of the government to quickly realize what is going on here. The Liberal government is not interested in supporting the oil and gas sector in Canada. The Liberals will talk a good game; I will give them that. Members on that side of the House will claim they approved the project and they support opening markets for Canadian oil. Then why did the government cave to environmental activists backed by foreign interests by banning tanker traffic on the northwest coast destroying the northern gateway project? Meanwhile, on the east coast, which is dependent on tanker shipments of oil from foreign despots, those same tankers can pull into Atlantic ports but not into Prince Rupert, B.C. It makes no sense.

Then there was energy east. Perhaps everyone will remember that project, the one that would have created 15,000 jobs and injected $55 billion into the Canadian economy. The energy east pipeline would have decreased our dependence on oil from the Middle East and countries with questionable human rights records. The Liberals claimed it was a decision by Trans Canada, that it had nothing to do with the government. It is no wonder these projects fail when we change the rules and pile on endless regulations and more red tape, all done mid-process.

The failure of energy east has nothing to do with any decision taken by Trans Canada. Instead, it was a result of the Prime Minister's mismanagement and failure to champion the Canadian energy sector.

The government is determined to keep Canada's oil, Canada's future, in the ground in northern Alberta. We can at least ship it to the United States, where Canadian producers are forced to discount their product by 30%. (1220)

If not pipelines, what is next? Today we rely on road and rail transport to move most of our oil at great risk to communities and Canadians on the road. This was made tragically apparent in Lac-Mégantic in 2013. A terrible event such as that would give us all reason to pause. The existing Trans Mountain pipeline system moves the equivalent of about 1,400 tanker truckloads, or 441 tanker railcars, daily. Expanding the Trans Mountain pipeline would result in safer, more efficient, and more economic shipment of oil between Alberta and British Columbia. Pipelines are safe. They are regulated. They are inspected.

The technology that goes into building and monitoring pipelines today is revolutionary. The Canadian men and women who build and monitor these pipelines, and who live and raise their families in the communities where the pipelines run, know what they are doing. They trust their skills and the skills of their co-workers. The government needs to stop the rhetoric and start supporting the hard-working Canadian families in the oil and gas sector.

I fear that the Prime Minister and the Minister of Natural Resources have made a fatal miscalculation in the standoff between Alberta and British Columbia. The B.C. government says that the proposed ban is designed to forestall any increase in exports via the Trans Mountain pipeline until it is assured the coast is perfectly safe from a spill. The truth is that the B.C. NDP government and its Green Party coalition detest Alberta oil, even though it fuels the productivity of their province. Their obstruc...”

Mr. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, CPC)

February 12th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...On the surface, we have two fighting New Democratic Party provincial governments. In B.C. we have a coalition NDP desperate to maintain its power through its deal with the Green Party. Of course, that coalition is on thin ice after the NDP approved the Site C dam project that it had railed against fo...”

Ms. Anita Vandenbeld (Ottawa West—Nepean, Lib.)

February 9th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...former Conservative Party as well. Former prime minister Stephen Harper, with the National Citizens Coalition, took the Government of Canada to court to strike down the rules that did not allow lobbyi...”

Ms. Sheila Malcolmson (Nanaimo—Ladysmith, NDP)

February 9th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...>Mr. Speaker, Gabriola Island opposes new freighter anchorages proposed off our shores. For Wyoming coal exports to China, there is zero local benefit . Our chamber of commerce, local governments, and...”

Mr. Nathaniel Erskine-Smith (Beaches—East York, Lib.)

February 5th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...same. As our lives have moved online, we have seen communities of people from different geographies coalesce around different issues and common experiences, yet our electoral system largely ignores th...”

Mr. Jonathan Wilkinson (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Lib.)

January 31st
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“...ollution will apply across the country. The government is accelerating the phase-out of traditional coal-fired electricity units. We are establishing a clean fuel standard to reduce our emissions by i...”

Mr. Don Davies (Vancouver Kingsway, NDP)

January 30th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...f attending the Freeze the Industry luncheon on Parliament Hill. Freeze the Industry is a youth-led coalition that is dedicated to stopping big tobacco from developing and marketing products that entice young people. I was inspired to see the coalition's unwavering support for plain and standardized packaging for tobacco products in Canada.

I also must give tremendous credit to organizations that have been on the front lines of this battle with big tobacco for decades. Their tireless efforts have saved countless lives over the years. Although there are too many to name individually, I would like to specifically recognize the advocacy of the Canadian Cancer Society, the Heart and Stroke Foundation, the Canadian Coalition for Action on Tobacco, Physicians for a Smoke-Free Canada, the Canadian Lung Association, and Coalition québécoise pour le contrôle du tabac. Of course, I would be remiss not to recognize the he...”

Mr. Jim Eglinski (Yellowhead, CPC)

January 30th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...he was created and envisioned as a model mining town as people moved in to work at the Grande Cache Coal mine. However, on Christmas Eve of 2015, the mine was closed, putting the last of its 650 miners out of work. Since then, the community has struggled with the loss of businesses, residents, and medical professionals.

Grande Cache is turning a new page. I am pleased to announce the purchase of Grande Cache Coal by Sonicfield Global. The court approved the sale on January 8, and the closing transaction is scheduled for May of this year. There will be an open house tomorrow at the local Métis hall, and company officials will be there.

To the residents and businesses of Grande Cache, this is great news. For the Yellowhead riding, coal mining is still a viable economic driver for the region.”

Ms. Hélène Laverdière (Laurier—Sainte-Marie, NDP)

January 30th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...]

Meanwhile, the crisis in Yemen has also worsened under the devastating attacks of the Saudi coalition.

I would like to know. Has the minister suspended any export permits to Saudi Arabia...”


The Senate

Hon. Anne C. Cools

June 20th
Hansard Link

Tributes Expression of Thanks

“...l. Thomas D’Arcy McGee was buried out of that school. Thomas D’Arcy McGee was able to fashion great coalitions of unity, alliance and cooperation between the French Roman Catholics and the Irish Roman...”

Hon. Dennis Glen Patterson

June 19th
Hansard Link

Budget Implementation Bill, 2018, No. 1 Fifteenth Report of Energy, the Environment and Natural Resources Committee on Subject Matter--Debate Concluded

“...anks lower than bigger emitters such as China and the U.S., which rely on greenhouse-gas-generating coal to generate electricity, due to the fact that Canada produces 60 per cent of its energy by clean hydro power while another 3 per cent of total energy consumption is generated by non-hydro renewable energy sources such as biomass, wind, tidal and solar. Conversely, the U.S. and China produce 30 per cent and 73 per cent respectively of their electrical energy from coal sources. So not only will this tax be punitive for residents, but it places Nunavut’s competiti...”

Senator Galvez

June 19th
Hansard Link

Budget Implementation Bill, 2018, No. 1 Twenty-ninth Report of National Finance Committee on Subject Matter--Debate Continued

“...carbon trading a “key part” of the government’s emissions plan, targeting oil and gas producers and coal-fired power plants. In 2008, B.C. implemented a carbon tax, with proceeds going back to taxpaye...”

Hon. Nancy J. Hartling

June 1st
Hansard Link

The Late Gary Francis McCauley

“...r; his loving partner and friend, Maire O’Callaghan; and his “purrfect” cats Daisy, Sadie and Casey Coal. They will be lost without his loving care. When he was an MP in Moncton in the early 1980s, I ...”

Senator Manning

May 31st
Hansard Link

National Strategy for the Prevention of Domestic Violence Bill Second Reading—Debate Adjourned

“...olence throughout their lifetime. This information is found on the website for the Western Regional Coalition to End Violence, an organization based in Cornerbrook, Newfoundland. Their website also st...”

Hon. Anne C. Cools

May 29th
Hansard Link

Canada’s Founding Fathers British North American Provinces’ Delegates at the 1864 Quebec Conference and John A. Macdonald—Inquiry—Debate Adjourned

“...y of Canada West Province, had joined John Macdonald and George-Étienne Cartier in their 1864 Great Coalition, which united Reformers and Conservatives in their shared goal of Confederation. At the Qu...”

Senator Coyle

May 24th
Hansard Link

The Senate Motion to Encourage the Government to Take Account of the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals as it Drafts Legislation and Develops Policy relating to Sustainable Development—Motion in Amendment—Debate Continued

“...concerned that the Indigenous peoples of Canada’s North are becoming the proverbial canaries in the coal mine. When love is the way there’s plenty good room, plenty good room for all of God’s children...”

Hon. Douglas Black

May 22nd
Hansard Link

Trans Mountain Pipeline Project Bill Third Reading—Debate

“...this legislation, Canada will owe him widespread support. This, honourable senators, is part of the coalition that has come together to support the project. Finally, honourable senators, I want to spe...”

Hon. Diane F. Griffin

May 22nd
Hansard Link

Ministry of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour Funding for Literacy Programs

“...e in discussion with provinces in Atlantic Canada in labour agreements for funding for the literacy coalitions.”

Hon. Terry M. Mercer (Deputy Leader of the Senate Liberals)

May 8th
Hansard Link

World Ovarian Cancer Day

“Honourable senators, today is World Ovarian Cancer Day, an initiative of the World Ovarian Cancer Coalition. Every year, on May 8, we recognize the women living with ovarian cancer — the survivors, their families and support systems — and the groups from around the world who continue to fight for funding for a cure and who help all those affected by this deadly disease. This is very close to my heart, honourable senators, as my wife, Ellen, is a survivor. This July, she will celebrate 22 years since her surgery in her fight against ovarian cancer, and our family is all very thankful for that. (1410) We attended the Breakfast in Teal yesterday morning in Halifax, organized by Ovarian Cancer Canada, in honour of World Ovarian Cancer Day. We were again told that ovarian cancer research receives less funding than other cancers that are less fatal. From 2005 to 2015, federal funding for breast cancer was $249 million, while that for ovarian cancer was only $38 million over the same period. According to the World Ovarian Cancer Coalition, ovarian cancer is diagnosed annually in nearly a quarter of a million women globally and ...”

Hon. Dennis Glen Patterson

May 1st
Hansard Link

Non-Nuclear Sanctions Against Iran Bill Third Reading—Debate

“...true that sanctions are more effective as multinational instruments that have a lot of partners and coalitions behind them. . . . That said, I don’t want to minimize the effect that leadership can als...”

Hon. Jane Cordy

April 19th
Hansard Link

Atlantic Memorial Park Project

“... former Princess Colliery mining site in Sydney Mines where my father-in-law Bill Cordy worked as a coal miner. The land provides an ideal vantage of the Sydney Harbour, with views out to the Atlantic Ocean. For this reason, the land was also used during wartime as a home to battery instalments, providing harbour defence during World War I and World War II. During the Battle of the Atlantic, Sydney Harbour was constantly under threat from the German U-boats. Submarine nets were deployed, and a network of seven fortifications around Sydney Harbour guarded the convoys and the region’s strategic steel and coal assets, which represented one third of Canada’s production at the time. Over 7,500 ships assemb...”

Hon. Richard Neufeld

April 17th
Hansard Link

Trans Mountain Pipeline Project Bill Second Reading--Debate Continued

“...ustry in B.C. to help reduce global emissions, but, again, despite the fact that LNG could displace coal in Asia and reduce electricity emissions by about 40 per cent in some markets, I’m labelled as ...”

Senator Neufeld

April 17th
Hansard Link

Trans Mountain Pipeline Project Bill Second Reading--Debate Continued

“That’s wrong. They formed a coalition afterward.”

Senator Martin

April 17th
Hansard Link

Trans Mountain Pipeline Project Bill Second Reading--Debate Continued

“It was a coalition.”

Hon. Michael L. MacDonald

March 29th
Hansard Link

Transportation Modernization Bill Bill to Amend—Third Reading—Debate

“...breakers, it served all of industrial Cape Breton, carrying steel from the Sydney mills, delivering coal from Glace Bay for export and refuelling, and handling incoming iron ore from Wabana, Newfoundland. It was all carried on the S&L to and from Louisbourg, the only deep-water, ice-free port on the island. In 1913, the Dominion Bureau of Statistics contained a table of the top 25 North American railroads, ranking them not by size but by tonnage carried. All of the great railroads in both Canada and the United States were listed. The Grand Trunk, the Pennsylvania, CP, the Reading, et cetera. These were mostly huge railroads, usually many hundreds or even thousands of miles in length, but number 18 of 25 was the S&L Railway. It had an asterisk by it. The footnote revealed that the 41-mile in length S&L, which ran northeast from Sydney to Glace Bay and south to Louisbourg, pulled more tonnage per mile than any other railroad in North America. That is a truly remarkable statistic. By the time I was growing up, times had changed. The train only ran on Tuesdays and Fridays as Cape Breton was beginning its industrial decline, but it still had one great defining characteristic. It was the last fully operational commercial steam railroad in North America. I realize now that I experienced something very few people my age or younger have ever experienced in North America. My uncle, Clarence Shaw, lived in Glace Bay, and he was a longtime engineer on the S&L. When he was on the Louisbourg run, this little boy knew that, during lunchtime at elementary school, if I got down to the train before it started out of town, I could ride to the end of town in the steam locomotive and get to blow that steam whistle at the two crossings. I did that a lot. I remember those steam locomotives so vividly — the heat, the sound of the steam, the firemen shovelling the coal and stoking the boilers, the smell of coal and the coal dust — but I remember two things best. One was the thrill of pulling that big steam whistle. It...”

Hon. Frances Lankin

March 27th
Hansard Link

Ministry of Natural Resources NAFTA Negotiations

“...g. It would be about deregulation, and environmental in particular. (1640) They use the examples of coal, energy transmission, a range of oil and gas issues, as things that could be allowed through th...”

Hon. Wanda Elaine Thomas Bernard

March 1st
Hansard Link

The Late Howard Douglas McCurdy, Jr., C.M., O.Ont.

“...he first Black professor to be tenured at any Canadian university. He co-founded the National Black Coalition of Canada and was the second Black member of Parliament in Canada. He was the recipient of...”

Hon. Murray Sinclair

February 28th
Hansard Link

Canada Business Corporations Act Canada Cooperatives Act Canada Not-for-profit Corporations Act Competition Act Bill to Amend—Third Reading—Motion in Amendment Negatived—Debate Continued

“...decision-making process of the many corporations that serve them. A brief submitted by the Canadian Coalition for Good Governance indicated that: While the quality of individual directors is paramount...”

Hon. Kim Pate

February 26th
Hansard Link

Question of Privilege Speaker’s Ruling Reserved

“...would have dug wells and built a water treatment plant even if it was a simple sand, gravel and charcoal facility. Within 2 years they would be exporting lumber and furniture to Southern Ontario. At t...”

Hon. Vernon White

February 15th
Hansard Link

Cannabis Bill Bill to Amend—Second Reading—Debate Continued

“...y it legally, I only need to say look no further than Ontario and a study from 2017 by the National Coalition Against Contraband Tobacco which identified that one third of all tobacco sold in Canada i...”

Hon. Victor Oh

February 15th
Hansard Link

Cannabis Bill Bill to Amend—Second Reading—Debate Continued

“...focused on preventing and delaying the onset of recreational use of cannabis by youth. The Canadian Coalition for the Rights of Children has specifically emphasized the need for funding for the servic...”

Hon. Diane Bellemare (Legislative Deputy to the Government Representative in the Senate)

February 14th
Hansard Link

Canada Business Corporations Act Canada Cooperatives Act Canada Not-for-profit Corporations Act Competition Act Bill to Amend—Third Reading—Motion in Amendment—Debate Continued

“...ose stakeholders, but they included employer associations, university women’s associations, and the Coalition for Real Equity, an organization some senators are very familiar with. To get back to what I was saying, the approach known as “comply or explain” is what prompted a review of the regulations in a number of provinces in 2014. Many stakeholders from various backgrounds took part in the review, including, as I said earlier, employer associations as well as women’s associations. The government’s approach to promoting women’s participation on corporate boards involves adopting a regulation similar to the provincial one. However, the government is taking this one step further than the provinces, since the federal legislation also makes room for diversity, thereby complying with the explicit request made by the Coalition for Real Equity in 2014 to provincial governments. We actually know a few people who have participated in that coalition, including Senator Omidvar. Senator Massicotte’s amendment seeks to enshrine the rules in ...”

Hon. Frances Lankin

February 13th
Hansard Link

Canada Business Corporations Act Canada Cooperatives Act Canada Not-for-profit Corporations Act Competition Act Bill to Amend—Third Reading—Motion in Amendment—Debate Continued

“...s.” Let me speak to another reputable organization that holds a similar view. That’s CCGG, Canadian Coalition for Good Governance. This is made up by members of primarily all the large institutional i...”

Hon. Kim Pate

February 7th
Hansard Link

Black History Month

“...he cemetery where Loyalists’ slaves were laid to rest in Saint-Armand, Quebec. For years, the Black Coalition of Quebec has been asking the government to recognize this site, which is now farmland, an...”

Hon. Douglas Black

February 6th
Hansard Link

Trans Mountain Pipeline Consideration of Matter of Urgent Public Interest Pursuant to Rule 8

“... world. That is the nub of the problem that we’re facing. I see Trans Mountain as the canary in the coal mine. If we don’t send a message as a country that we are open to responsible investment, then ...”

Hon. Richard Neufeld

February 6th
Hansard Link

Trans Mountain Pipeline Consideration of Matter of Urgent Public Interest Pursuant to Rule 8

“...Alberta oil, which the province uses in abundance, but which the NDP government and its Green party coalition allies consider to be vile. The article continues, and this is the kicker: This is such a ...”

Hon. Grant Mitchell

February 6th
Hansard Link

Trans Mountain Pipeline Consideration of Matter of Urgent Public Interest Pursuant to Rule 8

“...ssive Climate Leadership Plan, including a more ambitious carbon tax, phasing out of pollution from coal-generated electricity, tripling renewable energy by 2030 and capping oil sands emissions. There...”


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