Coal: The Last Six Months
Of Federal Activity

About

This Report

This is a computer-generated report that shows all of the federal activity with respect to the keyword "Coal" over the last six months. This is a demonstration of the power of our government relations automation software.

Hansard

House: 149 Speeches
Senate: 26 Speeches

House Senate

Bills

Active: 0

Regulations

Filed: 0
Proposed: 0

The House

Marc Miller (Liberal)

May 11th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...rural and smaller communities cannot. In the case specifically of getting communities off diesel or coal, these are projects that may be of some interest to the bank itself, but also to the $2 billion...”

Linda Duncan (NDP)

May 11th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...ated in the United States of America? Is the government thinking of export power lines perhaps from coal-fired power in Alberta and Saskatchewan? How does this benefit taxpayers? The law empowers the ...”

Peter Fragiskatos (Liberal)

May 11th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...ional investments include, among others, interprovincial transmission lines that reduce reliance on coal-fired power generation; the development of new low-carbon, renewable power projects; the expans...”

François Choquette (NDP)

May 11th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...ange, since there are going to be more and more extreme weather events.

The 2017 Green Budget Coalition has made some very important recommendations regarding investment in natural infrastructures and ecosystems. The following is an excerpt from one of the recommendations:

The Green Budget Coalition recommends that in Budget 2017 the Government of Canada allocate 30% of planned phase-2 Gr...”

Cathy McLeod (Conservative)

May 8th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...is is impacting communities and families across Canada. My home of British Columbia has been on the coalface, where the addictive use of drugs is now playing Russian roulette. Users never know when th...”

James Bezan (Conservative)

May 8th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...ter of defence was clearly focused on Canada's decision to withdraw its CF-18 fighter jets from the coalition air strikes, asking the [Minister of National Defence] to reconsider this decision on nume...”

Harjit S. Sajjan (Liberal)

May 8th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“... the fight against Daesh, and Canadians are now making an even greater impact as part of the global coalition, and we are seeing results. Canadian Forces are part of a broader whole-of-government appr...”

John McKay (Liberal)

May 8th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...tre, and his hard work, personal bravery, and dogged determination undoubtedly saved a multitude of Coalition lives.

My hon. colleagues do not want to listen to what General Fraser has to say.

Cathay Wagantall (Conservative)

May 8th
Hansard Link

Routine Proceedings

“...tee have publicly stated that they are in favour of stricter gun controls or in fact members of the Coalition for Gun Control. Only two members of this committee have a firearms background.

Thes...”

John McKay (Liberal)

May 8th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...tre, and his hard work, personal bravery, and dogged determination undoubtedly saved a multitude of Coalition lives. Through his courage and dedication, [the minister] has single-handedly changed the ...”

Karen McCrimmon (Liberal)

May 8th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...f the best who get that kind of ringing endorsement. The minister has earned the high praise of our coalition partners.

I love the article by Chris Vernon. If members have not read the article, ...”

Michelle Rempel (Conservative)

May 8th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ster of Defence was clearly focused on Canada's decision to withdraw its CF18 fighter jets from the coalition air strikes, asking [the defence minister] to reconsider this decision on numerous occasio...”

Catherine McKenna (Liberal)

May 5th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...eoples. This includes putting a price on pollution, making polluters pay. This includes phasing out coal by 2030. This includes historic investments in public transit, in green infrastructure, and in ...”

Andrew Leslie (Liberal)

May 5th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...matter up with the United States, just as the Prime Minister did with the U.S. President.

The coalition never offered conditions that Canada could accept. We want a good agreement, not just any ...”

Kelly McCauley (Conservative)

May 5th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ith. He does not have to be told about that $150 billion because he remembers the Liberal Party, in coalition with the Bloc Québécois and the NDP, demanding that billions more be added to the defici...”

Linda Duncan (NDP)

May 5th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ment, this is something that it is proceeding on with the workers of the province, including in the coal-fired power industry and for the oil sands industry. It is something that the Germans are pursu...”

Bob Bratina (Liberal)

May 5th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ally the best friends of American steel and vice versa. For example, the ability for us to exchange coal and iron ore between the two countries gives us a huge environmental advantage over countries l...”

Robert Sopuck (Conservative)

May 5th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...mals. These people are a danger to rural and remote communities. The seal hunt is the canary in the coal mine. As somebody who has fought the animal rights movement and the people who want to shut down communities like the one I represent, the seal hunt, the canary in the coal mine, the tip of the iceberg, pick a metaphor, whether it is anti-logging, anti-trapping, anti-hunting, anti-mining, and, quite frankly, anti-oil and gas, it is the rural communities that bear the brunt of these campaigns. One of the reasons I became a member of Parliament was to protect and defend rural communities. I have had experiences fighting the good fight on all these issues.

Interestingly enough, again going back to the animal rights movement and the animal rights groups, these people do not care about cuddly animals. They want an end to all animal use, farming, ranching, trapping, and sealing of course, and sealing is the easiest target. However, if we look at all their websites, they also want an end to animal-based medical research. I do not know if members in the House realize it, but when I met with the Heart and Stroke Foundation some time ago, I asked point blank how much of the cardiac research was done on animals and it was 60%. Again, these anti-animal use campaigns can be extremely harmful.

I will also talk about the unfairness of countries that ban seal products. The European ban was completely uncalled for. It is easy for another country to point fingers at another jurisdiction and pay no political price for it, while being made to look like people who care about the environment. The U.S. Marine Mammal Protection Act prevents seal products from entering the U.S., no matter how abundant seals are. (1400)

The animal rights movement caused a decrease in the seal harvest, and as colleagues talked about a minute ago, the number of harp seals has increased dramatically, from 1.8 million in 1970 to about 7.4 million now; and grey seals, from 13,000 in 1970 to 505,000 now. There are varying estimates, but the seals consume between 10 and 15 times what the east coast fleet harvests. It is quite clearly established that the high grey seal populations are preventing a recovery of the gulf cod.

Not that long ago, our fisheries committee submitted two reports to Parliament, one on Atlantic salmon and one on northern cod. In both studies, the seals were implicated in the decline of the Atlantic salmon in particular, and in the prevention of the recovery of the cod as well. Both committee reports recommended an expanded seal harvest, done humanely but expanded, to reduce the numbers of these seal species to improve the populations of Atlantic salmon and cod.

Nobody wants to wipe out the seals. However, I think it is our duty as human stewards of this earth to restore a balance that is completely out of whack right now.

I had the honour many years ago of doing work in the eastern Arctic, around Southampton Island, on Arctic char, and I had the honour of living with an Inuit family. I participated in a seal hunt and a walrus hunt. I have had a lot of experience in the outdoors, but I have had some Arctic experience. I do know what it is like to plunge one's hand into a freshly killed walrus and experience the joy and exuberance of the hunt when one is successful. It was an experience that I will cherish. I have eaten raw seal, raw walrus, and I found the tastes interesting, to say the least. It can be good.

I am very pleased, as well, to see an increase in demand for seal products, the seal oil, the high levels of omega 3. We have companies that are exploiting this. I applaud my colleague and the colleagues from all parties who support our traditions of sealing, hunting, trapping, and fishing. Many of us belong to an organization called the outdoor caucus, and I see a number of members wearing an outdoor caucus pin.

I want to finish up with the tale of Bill C-246. As we know, a Liberal member of Parliament introduced a private member's bill that many of us viewed as a closet animal rights bill. I was very pleased to see that many Liberal members of Parliament, and almost all Conservative members of Parliament, worked very hard to defeat that particular bill. We motivated people from all across the country to build a coalition of sealers, trappers, hunters, anglers, and medical researchers, who realized the implicat...”

Ed Fast (Conservative)

May 4th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...nounced that he is reducing the U.S. corporate tax rate from 35% down to 15%, and re-energizing the coal industry to deliver cheaper electricity to manufacturers. In Canada, we are going in the opposite direction, increasing taxes on our businesses and foisting astronomically expensive electricity costs on our job creators in places like Ontario.

Kevin Libin, writing in the National Post last week, commented:

As our G7 competitors have trimmed away at corporate tax rates, Canada’s average rates only grew, moving us from one of the most attractive to one of the least attractive in just a few years. Trump’s tax plan will make us look much, much worse. (1150)

That is disgraceful, to take a country that was a leader in competitiveness when it comes to taxes and lose that competitive advantage.

This does not end well. The Canadian Chamber of Commerce implored the federal government to reduce business costs and improve Canada's economic competitiveness. In fact, CEO Perrin Beatty had this to say:

Investment crosses borders like light through glass. If we continue to allow a growing gap between what it costs to do business in Canada and the costs our competitors face, businesses will be forced to locate their activities elsewhere.

Let me repeat, they will “locate their activities elsewhere”.

One organization that reached out to my office is the recently formed Coalition of Concerned Manufacturers of Ontario. They include the Canadian Federation of Independent...”

Andrew Leslie (Liberal)

May 4th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...matter up with the United States, just as the Prime Minister did with the U.S. President.

The coalition never offered conditions that Canada could accept. We want a good agreement, not just any ...”

Ed Fast (Conservative)

May 4th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...en she should be in Calgary?

The Prime Minister should be listening to Jocelyn Bamford of the Coalition of Concerned Manufacturers, who said that we are standing on a beach with a tidal wave cal...”

Kim Rudd (Liberal)

May 4th
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“...carbon pollution is only one part of the climate plan, which includes accelerating the phase-out of coal, developing a clean fuel standard, and taking action on short-lived climate pollutants. Canada'...”

James Bezan (Conservative)

May 3rd
Hansard Link

Privilege

“...ter of defence was clearly focused on Canada's decision to withdraw its CF-18 fighter jets from the coalition air strikes, asking the [Defence Minister] to reconsider this decision on numerous occasio...”

Randall Garrison (NDP)

May 3rd
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...ful, for instance, currently of refugees.

I had the privilege of meeting earlier today with a coalition of groups that support gay and lesbian transgender refugees from around the world. We talk...”

James Bezan (Conservative)

May 3rd
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“...he opposition and I think Canadians would prefer to see our troops deployed to fight terrorism in a coalition that is not under UN command.

The crux of the problem is that we have an organizatio...”

Cathay Wagantall (Conservative)

May 2nd
Hansard Link

Routine Proceedings

“...ither publicly stated that they are in favour of stricter gun control or are in fact members of the Coalition for Gun Control.

Only two members of this committee have a firearms background. Law-...”

Harjit S. Sajjan (Liberal)

May 2nd
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...er of National Defence, I am making sure we have all the right tools. We work very closely with our coalition partners in making sure, as we have done as government, we are taking a leadership role at...”

Mark Eyking (Liberal)

April 11th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...lost his life later in Passchendaele.

These young men came from farming, fishing, lumber, and coal mining families. I ask members in this House to join with me in remembering them and the thousa...”

Fin Donnelly (NDP)

April 11th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...housing.

I am proud to support this vision. I call on the federal government to work with the Coalition for a Healthy Riverview to help create this national centre for mental health excellence ...”

James Bezan (Conservative)

April 11th
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“...to protect Canadian sovereignty, to participate in NATO operations, as well as participate in other coalition activities, as we do from time to time.

When the Conservative Party was in governmen...”

Romeo Saganash (NDP)

April 10th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...gh. That is the party's decision, to go with it.

In November 2015, the Land Claims Agreements Coalition, which includes first nations in the Yukon, wrote to the Minister of Indigenous Affairs re...”

Sheila Malcolmson (NDP)

April 10th
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“...cess, the government cannot say that it is fulfilling that promise when in September of last year a coalition of indigenous leaders from across the entire continent, including Stewart Phillip of the U...”

Catherine McKenna (Liberal)

April 7th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... am very pleased that the Mining Association of Canada is a member of the carbon pricing leadership coalition. It understands that putting a price on carbon pollution not only reduces emissions, but i...”

Rachel Blaney (NDP)

April 7th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, hidden in plain sight in this year's budget was a big lump of coal for our military. By consistently deflecting to the upcoming defence policy review, the Ministe...”

Joël Godin (Conservative)

April 7th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...rd to pronounce—black carbon, and methane. We also established new rules to reduce emissions from coal-fired power plants.

Furthermore, we put in place measures to support the development of c...”

Marc Garneau (Liberal)

April 6th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... Halton law association, the Hamilton-Halton Women's Lawyers Association, and the Hamilton Taxpayer Coalition, of which she is president.

We all know how important it is for port authorities to ...”

Bill Casey (Liberal)

April 5th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“Mr. Speaker, the abandoned coal mines of Springhill, Nova Scotia have been sealed-off for more than 60 years. However, for the ...”

Justin Trudeau (Liberal)

April 5th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, on our commitment to continue as a valuable member of the coalition against Daesh, we were very clear in the election campaign that we would look for ways tha...”

Justin Trudeau (Liberal)

April 5th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...

Our allies were rightly interested in how Canada was going to continue to participate in the coalition against Daesh, how we were going to continue to demonstrate that Canada is a valuable part...”

Kennedy Stewart (NDP)

April 4th
Hansard Link

The Budget

“...nment that held renewable energy in nearly overt contempt. Anything that did not burn oil, gas, and coal was not worth the time of day as far as the Conservatives were concerned. Then came the Liberal...”

Gord Johns (NDP)

April 4th
Hansard Link

The Budget

“...ons in the riding of Courtenay—Alberni working hard to end homelessness, such as the Comox Valley Coalition to End Homelessness, Dawn to Dawn, the Port Alberni Shelter Society, and the Oceanside Tas...”

Harjit S. Sajjan (Liberal)

April 4th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ake it very seriously. That is why I spent two separate trips going into the region, talking to our coalition partners, talking to the regional leadership there, to make sure we have a plan that is ac...”

Harjit S. Sajjan (Liberal)

April 4th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, I have had numerous discussions with my coalition partners and the Iraqi leadership, including the Peshmerga, to get a good understanding of what is happening on the ground, to look at what we needed to do in the future. That is exactly what we have done. We put a plan in place that actually provides value to the coalition, and those are the results that we are having right now. We will continue to be a responsible partner to any coalition we belong to.”

James Bezan (Conservative)

April 4th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, the minister is not listening to our coalition partners. Nobody can believe him anymore.

Let me read a direct quote from the foreig...”

Harjit S. Sajjan (Liberal)

April 4th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, I would like to remind the member opposite that, when it comes to being a good coalition partner, we have to talk with the coalition and look at the situation on ground to be able to actually understand what the needs are. ...”

Harjit S. Sajjan (Liberal)

April 4th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ions with the previous minister of defence from Iraq, as well as the current one. We spoke with the coalition partners and have also taken a regional approach, because that is what we need to do to be a responsible coalition partner. I have worked in coalitions before. We need to be able to provide the right resources at the right time, and that is ...”

Harjit S. Sajjan (Liberal)

April 4th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...hree months to make sure that we have the right information, that we have good discussions with our coalition partners; it allows us to make an appropriate plan so that we continue to have a good impa...”

Marc Garneau (Liberal)

April 4th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... County Law Association, the Hamilton-Halton Women's Lawyers Association, and the Hamilton Taxpayer Coalition, of which she is president.

We are very pleased—”

Jenny Kwan (NDP)

April 3rd
Hansard Link

The Budget

“...rning and child care, zero; improving indigenous communities, zero; accelerating the replacement of coal generated electricity, zero; veterans emergency funds, zero; veterans and family well-being fun...”

Anne Minh-Thu Quach (NDP)

April 3rd
Hansard Link

The Budget

“...er, has decreased its emissions dramatically primarily by intervening in its most polluting sector, coal-fired power. Canada still prefers to continue to ignore the sector that is its largest polluter...”

Jean Rioux (Liberal)

March 21st
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“...mbers of the House are well aware, they are accomplishing a wide variety of tasks in support of the coalition. Our CAF personnel are contributing a great deal to this success, and we remain committed ...”

Hélène Laverdière (NDP)

March 20th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...ronto, Cycle Toronto, Ontario By Bike, Glacier Raft Company, Golden, B.C., Greater Victoria Cycling Coalition, BC Healthy Living Alliance, Saskatoon Cycles, Jane's Walk, in Ontario, Vélo Québec, Pi...”

Wayne Stetski (NDP)

March 20th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...roups, of course. They include whitewater rafters in British Columbia, the Greater Victoria Cycling Coalition, BC Healthy Living Alliance, Saskatoon Cycles, Canada Bikes, Citizens for Safe Cycling, Wa...”

Harjit S. Sajjan (Liberal)

March 9th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“... than 4,000 Canadian Armed Forces personnel served in the Persian Gulf as part of the international coalition of countries that forced the invading forces of Iraq from neighbouring Kuwait. (1045)

Our brave service men and women also made their mark this century battling terrorism and helping bring democracy to Afghanistan. The mission involved over 40,000 of our personnel, the largest deployment since the Second World War. The Canadian Forces' critical role in various wars has put Canada on the world stage, earning the respect and admiration of our allies and opposing forces alike. So too has our unwavering determination to keep the peace. More than 26,000 Canadians answered the call of a newly formed United Nations to help maintain international peace and security in Korea in the early 1950s. Canadians have taken part in repeated peacekeeping missions ever since, from the Suez Canal to the Sinai and Cyprus to Bosnia and Somalia. Time and again, Canadian Armed Forces members have been willing to put their lives at risk, whether courageously defending our country's values or contributing to international peace and security.

This proud heritage carries on today as the world community continues to look to the Canadian Armed Forces in times of need. Our current operations around the globe reinforce that the Canadian Armed Forces does not let countries in a crisis down.

I can point to our personnel's work in the Middle East. This includes Operation Artemis, our counterterrorism and maritime security operations across the Red Sea, the Gulf of Aden, the Gulf of Oman, and the Indian Ocean.

For Operation Impact, Canada's contribution to the Middle East stabilization force, the multinational coalition to degrade and ultimately defeat Daesh, the Canadian Armed Forces has deployed some 830 highly skilled personnel to conduct air operations, provide training and assistance to Iraqi security forces, increase the capabilities of regional forces, and provide medical services to the coalition forces. As of March 6, the Aurora has surveyed some 5,300 points of interest while the Polaris aircraft has delivered some 40.5 million pounds of fuel to coalition aircraft. This is what our Canadian Armed Forces personnel contribute.

Then there is...”

Randall Garrison (NDP)

March 9th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“.... They can now serve and are now an important part of what we can contribute to those international coalitions and obligations.

The one part I am concerned about and that my party is concerned a...”

Rachel Blaney (NDP)

March 9th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...ke coordination and armed reconnaissance coordination that will provide critical information to the coalition forces. If required, they can provide search and rescue missions. As of March 4, 2017, Aur...”

Cheryl Gallant (Conservative)

March 9th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...econd-class treatment from a Prime Minister who devalues the dangers they face every day. All other coalition soldiers receive special compensation through reduced taxation on their earnings. Last Sep...”

Leona Alleslev (Liberal)

March 9th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...sible for command and control of Operation Impact, as well as for the coordination of operations at coalition headquarters. Joint Task Force-Iraq is collecting and processing intelligence, helping to ...”

Jean-Claude Poissant (Liberal)

March 9th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...he Great Big Crunch, an event organized by FoodShare in partnership with Food Secure Canada and the Coalition for Healthy School Food.

I am proud to be the principal partner for this day for the...”

Cathay Wagantall (Conservative)

March 9th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“... dangers inherent in the region. There may be times when they will have to defend themselves, their coalition partners, or the forces they are mentoring.” However, his department decided they did no...”

Pierre Poilievre (Conservative)

March 7th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...arbon black is a material produced by the incomplete combustion of heavy petroleum products such as coal tar. Carbon black is used to produce pigment for ink, the kind of ink the government is using t...”

Luc Berthold (Conservative)

March 7th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...nation? Why is it so important that we address this issue today? I would like to quote the Canadian Coalition for Genetic Fairness, which said:

Genetic discrimination occurs when people are treated unfairly because of actual or perceived differences in their genetic information that may cause or increase the risk to develop a disorder or disease.

We are not talking about someone with a disease, or someone who is suffering, or someone undergoing treatment. We are talking about someone who may have a gene that could eventually result in that person developing a disease.

The Coalition goes on to provide examples.

For example, a health insurer might refuse to give coverage to a woman who has a genetic difference that raises her odds of getting ovarian cancer. Employers also could use genetic information to decide whether to hire, promote or terminate workers.

This is all based on the results of a genetic test. The Canadian Coalition for Genetic Fairness also said:

The fear of discrimination can discourage individuals from making decisions and choices, which may be in their best interest. For example, a person may decide not to have a genetic test for fear of consequences to their career or the loss of insurance for their family, despite knowing that early detection and treatment could improve their health and longevity.

That is what the Canadian Coalition for Genetic Fairness has said and how it describes the situation.

The concrete examp...”

Don Davies (NDP)

March 7th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...of witnesses supported the legislation as originally proposed. This view was echoed by the Canadian Coalition for Genetic Fairness, a diverse alliance of organizations that advocate on behalf of the f...”

Pam Damoff (Liberal)

March 7th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...rocketed to almost 35,000, with tests available for more than 10,000 conditions.

The Canadian Coalition for Genetic Fairness is a group of 18 organizations dedicated to establishing protections from genetic discrimination for all Canadians. Members include the ALS Society of Canada, the Alzheimer Society of Canada, Muscular Dystrophy Canada, the MS Society of Canada, Osteoporosis Canada, and 13 more. They have stated that cases of genetic discrimination have been documented in Canada and are continuing to grow. As they remind us, all Canadians are impacted by genetic discrimination. Each of us has dozens of genetic mutations that could increase or decrease our risk of getting diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, cancer, Parkinson's, or Alzheimer's disease.

While I was aware that genetic testing was available, like most Canadians I had not given it a lot of thought. While I knew that my father's colon cancer made it more likely for me to develop the same cancer, there was not a genetic test available for that particular cancer. I knew about the BRCA gene and its connection to breast and ovarian cancer, but it was not until last year, when I had a meeting with Ovarian Cancer Canada, that I was shocked to learn of the discrimination that is taking place in our country based on genetics.

Ovarian cancer is an insidious disease that is notoriously hard to detect. There is no reliable early detection test. It is the third most common reproductive cancer in women and one of the most deadly. I was told the story of two sisters who had a history of ovarian cancer in their family. Their doctors recommended genetic testing, as their prognosis would greatly improve with the knowledge gained from these tests. One sister had the testing, was positive for the gene, and had surgery to remove her ovaries. The other sister was told her insurance would be cancelled if she tested positive, so despite the fact that the test could potentially save her life, she was afraid to risk losing her insurance and did not get genetic testing.

Just last night, I received a letter from a constituent who wished to stay anonymous out of fear of discrimination. She disclosed that she and her daughter had a genetic test that found that they both had a gene that could leave them blind. She questioned the fairness of allowing a simple genetic test to undermine her future access to employment and insurance, and she worried about her daughter and the effect it could have on her career and future. She reminded me that we live in Canada, a country where we celebrate our differences. We protect one another from race, colour, sex, and disability discrimination.

In an article posted yesterday, representatives from Ovarian Cancer Canada and the Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs wrote:

For a young woman taking her first steps in building a professional career, the “wrong” genetic test results can impose a new glass ceiling....

Tomorrow is International Women's Day, and members of this House will have an opportunity to enhance women's health by allowing them to use genetic testing for early detection, monitoring, and intervention without the fear of being discriminated against. (1755)

Last year I had the opportunity to speak with Rabbi Stephen Wise from the Shaarei-Beth El congregation in Oakville. He shared with me the prevalence of certain genetic diseases within the Jewish community. He said that Bill S-201 would save lives. In fact, the Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs, a member of the Canadian Coalition for Genetic Fairness, which appeared as a witness before the justice committee, stated, ...”

Catherine McKenna (Liberal)

February 24th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...e to work with the Government of Saskatchewan on our climate change plan; for example, to phase out coal and to invest in innovation. I also had the chance to go to Saskatchewan. I listened to farmers...”

Alexandre Boulerice (NDP)

February 23rd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...gas emissions because it lowered energy consumption in places where people heated with gas, oil, or coal; and it created jobs because people and small businesses needed workers to replace windows and ...”

Cheryl Gallant (Conservative)

February 23rd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...hind Ontario's energy disaster are now running the country”. The author then asks, “Phasing out coal, a feverish pursuit of green energy, new tax regimes—where have we all heard this before?”

Posted December 7, 2016, by Graeme Gordon, it sets out in clear language the carbon tax controversy in Ontario and what Canadians can expect with the same person in charge in Ottawa. Quoting the CBC:

It is uncontroversial to call Ontario's energy situation a disaster. As [the liberal Premier] has herself conceded: Ontarians are now having to choose between paying the electricity bill and buying food or paying rent.

The article then clearly points out who was responsible for the carbon tax on electricity fiasco in Ontario, the Prime Minister's top adviser, Gerald Butts.

...it was former premier Dalton McGuinty and his Liberal team from 2003 to 2012—including his former principal secretary and “policy guru” Gerald Butts—who set Ontario onto this financially bleak, dead-end road. And now, Butts is headed on the same path, leading not the Premier, but the Prime Minister, on the way down.

Butts was, according to the Toronto Star, “the man they call 'the brains behind the operation” and the “policy architect of the Liberal government since 2003.”

Butts departed from McGuinty's government in 2008, but not before he and the Ontario Liberal team set the stage for the ill-fated Green Energy Act, in part, by signing onto dubious wind power projects and its cripplingly inefficient Renewable Energy Standard Offer Program (RESOP).

Let us be clear, as the CBC pointed out:

Butts himself takes—credit for initially enacting and seeing through those energy policies.

As the Toronto Star reported in 2012, “On his biography page at the WWF website, Butts cites how he was 'intimately' involved with the McGuinty government's environmental initiatives.” Another Canadian Press article made it clear that Ontario's energy policy was Butts' design, “McGuinty's plan came from his senior adviser, Gerald Butts.”

Butts has graduated to the halls of Parliament Hill as [the Prime Minister's] own principal secretary, leaving behind a province still paying the price, literally, for his tenure. His promise to eliminate coal, for example—a worthy gambit, if done fiscally responsibly—cost Ontario consumers an extra $37 billion between 2006 and 2014, according to an auditor general, and is expected to cost another $133 billion from 2015 to 2032. (1140)

Let us read what else the CBC had to say about Gerald Butts:

Now he's doubling down, via the prime minister, on his green energy gambit by promising to enact carbon pricing regimes (read: tax) on all provinces by 2018 and phasing out coal by 2030, even as our neighbour and biggest competitor [the United States] moves in the opposite direction. How team...[Butts] sees a carbon-priced Canada competing against the U.S. on an off-kilter playing field confounds most people's common sense....

The federal Liberals, under the stewardship of Butts, has already run a projected $30 billion deficit in its first year in office.

This comes after promising a $10 billion deficit for each of the first three years. It is a $60 billion broken promise.

Phasing out all coal by 2030 will have a cost that will add to that deficit. (This sounds awfully familiar, no?) For...”

Francesco Sorbara (Liberal)

February 23rd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...t strongly in support of a price on pollution by joining the World Bank's carbon pricing leadership coalition. It is why many leading corporations, including Suncor, Canadian Tire, and General Electri...”

Cathay Wagantall (Conservative)

February 23rd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...aking things better. We already do some of the best farming and best industry in the country.

Coal in Estevan was visited by the minister, and she made very little mention of it. I am wondering ...”

Kelly McCauley (Conservative)

February 23rd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...he Conservative government that established regulations to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the coal-fired electricity sector. We were the first country to ban the construction of traditional coal units under these guidelines. Our previous Conservative government also pursued a responsible s...”

Jonathan Wilkinson (Liberal)

February 23rd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“... in the framework include the following: accelerating the phase-out of highly polluting traditional coal power; developing a clean fuels standard to stimulate greater user of biofuels; investing in pu...”

Robert Sopuck (Conservative)

February 23rd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...is simply math. The math also says, if we look at what China is doing right now, it is building two coal-fired projects every single week.

How does the carbon tax, or, more correctly, a carbon d...”

Linda Duncan (NDP)

February 23rd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...>The reason Alberta moved forward first, and then the Liberal government followed, in shutting down coal-fired power sooner was not simply because it was one of the largest sources of carbon in Albert...”

Dan Albas (Conservative)

February 23rd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...rors.

Let me explain. Not long ago, the Liberals made hoopla announcing that they were ending coal burning power by 2030, despite the fact that most provinces already do not utilize coal power or are already on the way to doing precisely that. It sounded like the Liberals were taking action, yet quietly, the Liberals turned around and gave extensions to the two provinces that use coal power to continue doing so after the year 2030. In other words, that announcement was also all ...”

Carol Hughes (NDP)

February 22nd
Hansard Link

Routine Proceedings

“...ore than 500 individuals, in support of the Algoma passenger train service. It was sponsored by the Coalition for Algoma Passenger Trains, which created two online petitions as well as postcard and paper petition campaigns.[Translation]

The Coalition for Algoma Passenger Trains wants to remind the government that for more than 100 years th...”

Joël Godin (Conservative)

February 21st
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...illor; Alan Wells, chair of the Rouge Park Alliance; Heather Moeser, former executive member of the Coalition of Scarborough Community Associations ; Keith Laushway, chair of the Waterfront Regenerati...”

Jim Eglinski (Conservative)

February 21st
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ght now. Yellowhead also has active mining, and it is an energy-producing region with oil, gas, and coal.

However, tourism is one of Yellowhead's economic drivers, because of Jasper National Par...”

Sven Spengemann (Liberal)

February 17th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...es, the Mississauga—Lakeshore skyline was defined by the Four Sisters, the smokestacks of the old coal-burning Lakeview generating station. Since this plant was taken down, over 10 years ago, the co...”

Catherine McKenna (Liberal)

February 17th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...t was nothing to do with the Conservatives. It was because the Liberal government in Ontario closed coal-fired plants and also because the economy was not doing well.

We understand we need to pu...”

Peter Julian (NDP)

February 17th
Hansard Link

Routine Proceedings

“...quire comprehensive, independent health and environmental impact assessments before considering new coal shipping projects; to implement a credible, inclusive, broad, and open consultation process; an...”

Gary Anandasangaree (Liberal)

February 17th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...uge Park. There were a number of other organizations that preceded me, including the save the Rouge coalition. It was set up 30 years ago and started its great work in achieving this dream.

The ...”

Pierre Nantel (NDP)

February 16th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“... (1120)

I would also cite as an example that in 2013 Longueuil decided to join the Canadian Coalition of Municipalities Against Racism and Discrimination under UNESCO. The municipality subsequ...”

David Sweet (Conservative)

February 16th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“... and by a voluntary group of parliamentarians here in Parliament, called the Canadian Parliamentary Coalition to Combat Antisemitism, in a report in 2010.

When the term Islamophobia stands up to...”

Jean Rioux (Liberal)

February 15th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... our strategy, which was developed with the Iraqi government's consent and in consultation with our coalition partners.

Canada will supply equipment such as small arms, personal protective equip...”

Scott Reid (Conservative)

February 15th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...ee on International Human Rights from 2008 to 2015. Second, I co-chaired the Canadian Parliamentary Coalition to Combat Anti-Semitism in 2010 and 2011.

Let me start by noting the very close textural relationship between Motion No. 103, which we are debating today, and the Conservative Party's motion, which we will be debating tomorrow. Both condemn all forms of systemic racism and religious discrimination. Both use identical language to instruct the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage to undertake a study on hate crime and to seek out ways of reducing or eliminating discrimination. Both instruct the committee to report back to the House in 240 days.

The two motions differ in only three particulars.

First, the Conservative motion condemns racism, religious intolerance, and discrimination against all of Canada's largest religious groups: Muslims, Jews, Christians, Sikhs, and Hindus, while Motion No. 103 mentions only Islam by name.

Second, the focus of Motion No. 103 is on the undefined term Islamophobia rather than on protecting Muslims as individuals. This implies that what Canada needs is state protection for faiths rather than for the safety of the faithful.

Finally, the Conservative motion specifically names, as the paradigmatic example of impermissible hatred, what it describes as “the recent and senseless violent acts at a Quebec City mosque”. This wording reiterates that it is the faithful who must be protected rather than the faiths they profess, since eternal truth is under the protection of an almighty and all-loving protector far more powerful than the Government of Canada.

Based on these distinctions, I will be voting against Motion No. 103 in favour of the alternative motion which we will be debated tomorrow.

The contrast between these two motions is reminiscent of a similar contrast between the motions considered during the course of a decade-long debate at the United Nations Human Rights Council.

In 1999, Pakistan introduced a motion calling for all UN member states to take measures in their domestic law to ban the defamation of religions. Pakistan's motion went through a number of incarnations. Initially it referred only to Islamophobia, but as time went on, reference was made to other religions as well. For example, the 2009 version condemned the defamation of religion as a human rights violation and authorized an annual report “on all manifestations of defamation of religions and in particular, on the serious implications of Islamophobia”.

Pakistan's set of motions met with consistent opposition from many democracies, including both Canada and the United States, and from many civil liberties groups as well. Human rights groups pointed out that this measure could have the effect of authorizing or even mandating domestic blasphemy laws, with citizens of any complying state potentially being found guilty in their domestic courts of blaspheming against religions in which they had never been participants or believers.

As well, in 2007, the United Nations Special Rapporteur on Contemporary Forms of Racism, himself a Muslim, reported back that the special and isolated reference to Islam in the motion was widely seen as creating what he referred to as “the hierarchization of forms of discrimination”.

Eileen Donahoe's critique of the motion is also worth repeating. She was President Obama's ambassador to the United Nations. She said:

We cannot agree that prohibiting speech is the way to promote tolerance, and because we continue to see the “defamation of religions” concept used to justify censorship, criminalization, and in some cases violent assaults and deaths of political, racial, and religious minorities around the world.

In 2011, this deadlock was broken when the United States and Pakistan co-authored a new resolution which was adopted as Resolution 16/18, under the title, ”Combating intolerance, negative stereotyping and stigmatization of, and discrimination, incitement to violence and violence against, persons based on religion or belief.” It is a long but comprehensive title.

Resolution 16/18 bears the same relationship to the Pakistani delegations's previous motions that the motion we will be debating tomorrow bears to Motion No. 103, which we are debating today.

This episode reminds us that freedom of religion and freedom of speech are not opposed concepts. It is no accident that they are protected side-by-side in the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. (1855)

Section 2 of the charter reads as follows:

2. Everyone has the following fundamental freedoms:

(a) freedom of conscience and religion;

(b) freedom of thought, belief, opinion and expression, including freedom of the press and other media of communication;

(c) freedom of peaceful assembly; and

(d) freedom of association.

We cannot have one of these freedoms unless the others are protected in equal measure. We cannot have freedom of religion without having the ability to try to convince others to share in one's thoughts and beliefs and therefore to abandon the religion, or absence of religion, to which they presently adhere. We cannot have freedom of religion if we cannot assemble peacefully to pray, whether that be in a church, a mosque, a synagogue, or a public place. We cannot have freedom of religion if we cannot associate with other like-minded individuals.

To better make the point about the spirit that lies behind tomorrow's motion, and to distinguish it more clearly from Motion No. 103, let me now turn to the classic jurisprudence on the issue of the relationship between speech and safety, which comes from the Supreme Court of the United States in its 1919 ruling in Schenck v. United States. Speaking for the unanimous court, Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes wrote the following:

The most stringent protection of free speech would not protect a man in falsely shouting fire in a theatre and causing a panic.... The question in every case is whether the words used are used in such circumstances and are of such a nature as to create a clear and present danger that they will bring about the substantive evils that Congress has a right to prevent.

In other words, it is when, and only when, speech is a form of action, and when that action itself would be a criminal offence, that speech may be prohibited by law.

By the way, lest anyone regard the reference to “shouting fire in a theatre” as being merely a rhetorical flourish, I should point out that Justice Holmes was referring to a real-life event: the fatal stampede that occurred after someone shouted “fire” at a party in a crowded community hall in Calumet, Michigan on Christmas Eve, 1913. This disaster, which killed 73 people, was disturbingly similar to the mosque shooting in Quebec City, and it is correctly regarded to this day as the worst act of mass murder in Michigan's history.

I should point out as well that there are practical dangers in developing new categories of legislated impermissible speech, as opposed to legitimate bans on the kind of speech that constitutes criminal incitement.

In the 1970s and 1980s, Ernst Zundel was able to turn his serial prosecutions on charges of inciting hate to generate far more publicity than would otherwise have been possible for so marginal, and frankly, contemptible and laughable a character. Had he simply been ignored, it would have been better for the cause of openness in Canada. Indeed, he was able to use this publicity, this notoriety, to turn himself into a sort of media celebrity. Similarly, the existence of laws in Weimar Germany against the defamation of religions, including Judaism, did nothing to slow down the rise of the Nazis.

Seven years ago, this fact led me, along with other Conservative members of Parliament on the Canadian Parliamentary Coalition to Combat Antisemitism, to disagree with our Liberal colleagues, who wanted to expand the ...”

Jean Rioux (Liberal)

February 15th
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“...are proud to say that beginning in November 2016, the Canadian Armed Forces assumed the lead of the Coalition Role 2 medical facility in Northern Iraq. The team is made up of doctors, nurses, medical ...”

Jean Rioux (Liberal)

February 15th
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“...obal fight to defeat Daesh. Our military personnel continue to provide extraordinary support to the coalition.”

Cathy McLeod (Conservative)

February 14th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“Mr. Speaker, we are on the coal face, and certainly as far back as shortly after the state of emergency in British Columbia was...”

Alistair MacGregor (NDP)

February 14th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...We had the Canadian Human Rights Commission, the Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs, the Canadian Coalition for Genetic Fairness, the Canadian Association of Genetic Counsellors, the Canadian Medica...”

Jean Rioux (Liberal)

February 14th
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“...ccording to plan and on schedule.

The Canadian Armed Forces have also assumed the lead of the Coalition Role 2 medical facility in Northern Iraq. Approximately 50 military personnel are currently working at the facility with a mandate to provide medical and surgical care to support coalition forces. A total of 364 patients have been treated there so far. Members of the Canadian Armed Forces who have received care were treated for illnesses or injuries sustained outside the battlefield. We are very proud of the contribution of our medical teams.

We understand that Canadians want to know what our troops are doing and that is why our government has always been open and transparent about this mission. When we have information, we will be pleased to inform the opposition on the peacekeeping mission in Africa. A lot more information is needed. When decisions have been made and the requested information is available, the House will be notified.

Contrary to what my colleague opposite said, our government is working hard to keep Canadians informed in many different ways. There have been several technical briefings about the mission in recent months, one of which was broadcast on social media. A technical briefing was held on January 26 to provide updates on what Canadian troops are doing and what Iraqi security forces have accomplished in the operation to liberate Mosul. At another technical briefing, this one in November, officials discussed what our military men and women were doing in the campaign for Mosul. The minister and the chief of the defence staff also appeared before a parliamentary committee to talk about the mission.

The Canadian Armed Forces also made it possible for journalists to visit operations, as they did in November 2016, and we will continue to do so regularly. Journalists were able to observe first-hand how Canada is supporting the coalition.

We will continue to demonstrate transparency, but we will do so while constantly ta...”

Jean Rioux (Liberal)

February 14th
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“...ight to defeat Daesh.

Our military personnel continue to provide extraordinary support to the coalition and the Iraqi government to help dismantle and ultimately wipe out Daesh. We are extremely...”

Kelly McCauley (Conservative)

February 13th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...s metals and minerals. Alberta's metals and minerals sectors include natural gas, conventional oil, coal, minerals, and the oil sands. More specifically, Alberta's metal refinery and mineral sector is a foundational industry that allows for infrastructure development as well as energy and natural resource production in Alberta. It generated 28% of the province's total GDP in 2011, and employs more than 181,000 Albertans, creating employment opportunities that provide some of the highest earnings in the Alberta economy. Exports of metals and minerals currently face tariffs as high as 10%.

There is agriculture and agrifood. Alberta has more than 50,000 farms with crop and livestock production. They produce an abundance of world-class agriculture commodities. The agriculture and agrifood sector employs nearly 76,000 Albertans and contributes 2.5% to the GDP. Between 2010 and 2012, the exports of agriculture products to the EU suffered tariffs of over $35 million. That is $35 million that can be reinvested in the economy, jobs, and productivity improvement.

There are forest products. The forest products sector employs nearly 19,000 Albertans and represents a significant component of the economy. Forest product exports to the EU average $62 million and face up to a 10% tariff right now. These barriers would be eliminated under CETA.

There is advanced manufacturing. Alberta's advanced manufacturing industry employs more than 28,000 people. Between 2010 and 2012, Alberta's exports of advanced manufacturing products to the EU averaged a quarter of a billion dollars, which face tariffs as high as 22%. Industrial machinery, one of Alberta's key advanced manufacturing exports to the EU, faces tariffs of up to 8%.

Alberta is a major producer of chemicals and plastics. It employs 11,000 Albertans, an important part of exports to the EU, with exports averaging just under $100 million a year. These exports currently face tariffs of up to 6.5%. Again, these would be eliminated.

In addition to beef and agriculture products, CETA would also provide for increases in eligible trade for products with high sugar content. This stipulation would enable a company like PepsiCo, which has a large bottling facility in Edmonton's west end as well as other parts of Alberta, to continue to ship its products abroad and find new customers in new markets duty free. The stipulation for sugary products would also help local Edmonton start-ups, such as JACEK Chocolate Couture, which opened in Sherwood Park last year, and has now expanded into Canmore as well as downtown Edmonton. It will help it to hire new employees and reach a massive new market base.

CETA will open up markets for our burgeoning alcoholic beverage companies, which products are very well known to members of the Alberta Conservative caucus. There are over 50 breweries in Alberta, including favourites like Big Rock, Alley Kat, and Yellowhead. There are distilleries like Eau Claire Distillery, which makes gin and vodka from only local Alberta grains, and Park Distillery, based in Banff, that makes a vodka with glacial waters from the Rockies.

Closer to my home in Edmonton, there is Red Cup Distilling in Vegreville. I am wearing the button today supporting Vegreville. There is also the Big Rig Craft Distillery in Nisku, by the Edmonton airport, where people can get brum, which is basically rum made with sugar beets instead of sugar cane. I want to note it's called brum and not rum, so as not to run afoul with the rum lobby. If the all-powerful rum lobby is watching on CPAC today, please note I called it a brum and not a rum.

Edmonton is home to many head offices of world-class companies that are said to grow, compete, and win with access to this huge new market. PCL Construction has finished Rogers Place in downtown Edmonton, the finest hockey and event arena in the entire world. Stantec engineering, Booster Juice, and Weatherford are all based in Edmonton.

Edmonton is also renowned for its start-up culture, and many new enterprises will benefit from increased access to markets and added IP protection. TappCar is a ride-share company that has gained ground by working with municipal governments rather than circumventing local laws. Drizly is an app that arranges liquor deliveries. Should it expand to the Parliament Hill area, I am sure that sales will spike massively. My wife's personal favourite is Poppy Barley shoes, which has grown from a small, shared office space downtown to Edmonton's famous Whyte Avenue, with pop-ups in Toronto. (1345)

Edmonton also boasts having three of the top fifteen start-up companies in Canada, as named by Metabridge. The first is LoginRadius, which does customer analytics and serves over 1,000 businesses worldwide. There is Mover, a company that handles cloud file migration. The third company is Showbie, which helps teachers, schools, and students get connected across technology platforms.

Edmonton's bread-and-butter business, the oil and gas sector, stands to benefit tremendously from CETA by increasing market access to our oil and gas products. The Prime Minister wants to phase out oil and gas, but CETA represents a grand opportunity for Canada's job-creating and economic-driving industry to capitalize on new customers.

Supplier diversification is one of the European Union's top energy priorities. Currently Russia has 31% of the EU's oil and gas import market share, making it first. Canada has just 1% of the market share, placing us 26th. It is well known that Russian President Putin uses his country's oil and gas reserves as a weapon. Given that Russia supplies almost one-third of the EU's oil and gas, this position is strong. The EU needs to diversify, wants to diversify, and Alberta has plenty to offer. Not only will this create wealth and jobs in Alberta and the rest of Canada, it will help to free Europe from the bullying and blackmail of the Russian president and deprive him of his desperately needed revenues that he uses to threaten our democratic allies. The Right Honourable Stephen Harper famously told Putin to get out of Ukraine. CETA will help us get him out of Europe's oil and gas business.

As CETA reduces and eliminates tariffs across the board for oil and gas products, Canada and Alberta are well poised to fill the gap and become a crucial energy ally. This is an opportunity that we should not pass up, and frankly cannot pass up. The government may perhaps one day support energy east, and then we can ship Alberta oil to Quebec and New Brunswick for refining and stop sending jobs and billions of dollars to despotic regimes like Saudi Arabia.

Beyond energy, free trade helps foster greater co-operation between our democratic allies. We strongly support international trade initiatives that strengthen the bonds with friendly countries, increase economic productivity, and drive prosperity and job creation.

The world is full of uncertainty, and prior champions of trade and co-operation are retreating. This comes at an unfortunate time for Canada. Our country has the fastest-growing population in the OECD, and the west has the fastest-growing and youngest population in Canada. We have products. We have workers. We have the businesses. We will continue to have more people and more products over the next few years, and we need places to sell these goods.

CETA is an opportunity for us to secure access to the largest single market in the world at a time when other countries are retreating. Not only will this agreement help to give our job creators access to growing and demanding markets, it will give Canadians a head-start advantage over our competitors who are retreating from the global marketplace.

Even after all of these benefits I have discussed and talked about, CETA's detractors argue that the costs outweigh the benefits. They will say that CETA gives too much power to corporations and will allow them to sue governments for compensation if they change policies. The argument is callously thrown around as a holistic and negative point. It is just an assertion.

According to a summary in The Globe and Mail, CETA opens up a new process called the investment court system, or ICS. The ICS essentially acts as a permanent tribunal to handle complaints brought by businesses. Canada and the EU have hailed the ICS as a breakthrough offering a high level of protection for investors while fully preserving the right of governments to regulate and pursue legitimate public policy objectives, such as the protection of health, safety, and our environment.

It is perfectly legitimate for businesses that act in good faith and set up shop in new countries because of a trade agreement to be able to protect themselves from arbitrary changes by the host government. If governments agree to and sign a trade agreement, they agree to be bound by the provisions of that trade agreement with some exceptions. It is unreasonable to make governments the sole power holder in this arrangement.

If we expect companies to come to Canada, to do business in Canada, to create work for Canadians, and create wealth for our country, we must be able to guarantee them some modicum of stability and predictability, or at least grant them some recourse if a future government makes arbitrary changes that violate the provisions of that trade agreement. This is a two-way street, and businesses do not deserve less protection just because they are creating jobs, making investments, and earning profits.

At the same time, it is also important that governments are able to react to changing circumstances and create legislation that is good for Canadians in the event that exceptional circumstances arise. This is why CETA has built in provisions to protect both business and government.

I want to note here that Canadian investment in the EU was almost a quarter of a trillion dollars as of 2014. That is Canadian investment that will also be protected from the whims of a changing political landscape in Europe. (1350)

The Consider Canada City Alliance is a partnership with 12 of our largest cities. These cities represent 63% of Canada's GDP and 57% of our population. They work to increase investment in Canada and grow trade opportunities.

Our own highly respected Edmonton Economic Development Corporation is part of this coalition. Michael Darch, president of the CCCA states:

We see Canada moving toward creating t...”

Alistair MacGregor (NDP)

February 10th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“Mr. Speaker, in November last year, the BC Child and Youth Advocacy Coalition released its B.C. child poverty report, which shows the growing income inequality among B....”

Phil McColeman (Conservative)

February 9th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...t important is the hard work of so many Brantford residents to make this happen. To the Brant Tree Coalition founder, Jim Berhalter, and Chuck Beach and his team, I give a huge shout out and thanks.<...”

Sheila Malcolmson (NDP)

February 9th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...use the parties are elected together and co-operate together. There are shifts, of course, in those coalitions over time.

No one would describe Norway as an unstable democracy. It elects more wo...”

David de Burgh Graham (Liberal)

February 9th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...centrist government. It has a government that alternates between a left-wing party and a right-wing coalition, with no centrist party ever doing well. Finland and Israel use very similar pure proporti...”

Carol Hughes (NDP)

February 8th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...k I hosted an event in support of the national initiative for eating disorders. This not-for-profit coalition works to increase awareness and education for the chronic situation facing sufferers of ea...”

Tracey Ramsey (NDP)

February 8th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...e ramifications this may have on Canada's maritime industry. The Canadian Maritime and Supply Chain Coalition, which includes the Seafarers' International Union of Canada and the International Longsho...”

Thomas Mulcair (NDP)

February 8th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...nding everyone that the tragedy of the loss of jobs in Grande Cache has to do with the closing of a coal mine, first and foremost. However, it is another example that in the energy sector, because tha...”

Niki Ashton (NDP)

February 8th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...Conservatives have failed to embrace a definition of energy which goes beyond oil, natural gas, and coal. These hardships are also a direct result of successive governments that have failed to diversify not just our energy economy but our resource-based economy more broadly.

I am from a mining town and we know what a boom and bust economy means for us. Our region also knows the importance of value-added jobs. Right now we are on the verge of losing hundreds of value-added jobs, particularly in the mining industry in our part of the country. People in Flin Flon and Thompson are very concerned, afraid, worried, and angry. Some months ago people in The Pas also faced insecurity. While there has been an interim solution, people continue to be concerned about the future of their resource sector, namely forestry.

In all of these cases what has been clear is that the federal government has been nowhere to be found to stand up for Canadian workers in our communities, much like in communities in Alberta and elsewhere. In fact, in our north, the federal government is nowhere to be found, not just in the communities I mentioned but also when it comes to Churchill, the Port of Churchill, or infrastructure jobs that were also committed to our communities.

Tonight we are talking about a situation that is increasingly impacting workers across the country. The reality is that the jobs situation in Canada is worsening. Over the last number of years, and it was certainly the case this past year, we have been creating more part-time, unstable work. Over the last year, full-time jobs only grew by 0.5%. This is related to job losses in the oil sector. More and more Canadians are struggling in precarious work. Many of them are young people.

That is why less than a year ago we launched a tour on the rise of precarious work in the millennial generation. We took our tour to Alberta. We went to Edmonton and Calgary. We heard heartbreaking stories about the challenges that young people were facing in these communities in difficult times.

I remember in Calgary we heard from an MLA, a minister in the government. She talked about how Calgary was often seen as a place of hope for many young Canadians and now even if one was from Alberta, that individual could barely make it by.

In Edmonton we heard from a young woman, a freelance journalist, who talked about the economic insecurity that she faced and how recently one of her bosses was told that if she wanted to find greater economic security, she should just get married.

The reality is that there is a way forward. That is by standing up for value-added jobs, standing up to companies that want to rip and ship our resources, standing up for a just transition.

We have heard tonight that research shows that an investment of $1 million in coal creates seven jobs. That same investment of $1 million creates 14 jobs in the solar industry an...”

John Barlow (Conservative)

February 8th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...of the most diversified economies in all of Canada. To talk about Alberta, we should talk about our coal industry, our forestry sector, our agriculture sector. There is a reason that everybody knows a...”

Borys Wrzesnewskyj (Liberal)

February 7th
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...en destroyed and in whose libraries and schools history began with the 1917 Bolshevik revolution; a coal mining and heavily industrialized region that was also among the Soviet Union's most ecological...”

Robert Kitchen (Conservative)

February 3rd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...he economy.

The announcement of a Liberal carbon tax, as well as the planned phase-out of the coal-fired electricity, has also devastated my constituents at a time when jobs are already scarce. At this point in time, my constituents are looking for their government to create jobs and get them back to work.

Despite the Liberals' lack of action on that front, I am pleased that CETA will provide an opportunity for employment through the opening of markets for several industries, namely agriculture.

Once CETA comes into force, 98% of all tariffs between Canada and the EU will immediately be eliminated. The tariff exemption on goods will result in over $1.4 billion being added to Canada's merchandise exports to the EU by 2022. It is hoped that the removal of tariffs and barriers to trade will create the jobs my constituents so badly need and that it would improve productivity and promote growth.

My riding contains hundreds of farms. The agricultural industry is the backbone of my constituency. I am greatly supportive of any trade deal that would bolster that industry. Farmers feed Canada and the world and so anything that can be done to increase the access of these farmers to international markets should be done. Through CETA, these producers will have an additional 500 million consumers to which they can market their agricultural and agrifood products.

For agricultural and agrifood products, specifically, almost 94% of the EU tariff lines on Canadians goods will be duty-free once CETA enters into force. As the tariff phase-outs are completed, this will rise to 95% of products, approximately seven years after the agreement comes into force.

This is great news for Saskatchewan producers. From 2013 to 2015, 80% of principal merchandise exports from Saskatchewan to the EU were from the agriculture and agrifood industry, amounting to $935.4 million. With the current EU tariff, tariffs on products such as durum wheat are as high as 148 euros per tonne. Once CETA comes into force, tariffs such as this would be eliminated completely.

Again, this will create a trickle-down effect, but a positive one. Agricultural producers will not only have access to a large and mature market, but they will also save money when it comes to the elimination of tariffs on their exports. This will mean they will be able to hire more employees, creating jobs, while also gaining access to the world's largest market. This is exactly what Saskatchewan and, in particular, my constituents need at this time. (1045)

I am also pleased that CETA will provide Canadian producers with preferential access to markets. As this is the first comprehensive trade deal between the EU and any other country, Saskatchewan farmers and ranchers will be in a position to market their products to the largest economy in the world, products such as beef, pork, and bison. I know my constituents are supportive of any initiative that opens up markets for trade. I hope the government can recognize just how important it is to have this happen as soon as possible.

A joint Canada-EU study that supported the launch of negotiations concluded that a trade agreement with the EU could bring a 20% boost in bilateral trade, and a $12 billion annual increase to Canada's economy. This is the economic equivalent of adding $1,000 to the income of the average Canadian family, or almost 80,000 new jobs to the Canadian economy. At a time when jobs are scarce in my constituency, this added revenue will make a huge difference in the lives of those who are struggling to find work. By opening new markets, jobs are both directly and indirectly created, something that is badly needed in my riding.

The implementation of CETA will also affect a number of other industries, though more indirectly. For example, when a farmer needs to get his grain to market, he has to hire someone to transport that product. This is a job that might otherwise not exist, and so it is essentially job creation. Farmers also need to utilize services of maintenance workers for their heavy machinery and equipment. Again, this is job creation. At a time when my riding is in dire need of jobs, CETA allows easier market access to producers, which allows producers to hire more people, especially in the services industry, and benefits the economy of Saskatchewan overall.

While the focus of my speech has so far been mainly on agriculture, the services industry I just mentioned will also benefit from CETA coming into force. The services sector is a key contributor to Saskatchewan's economy, accounting for 57% of the province's total GDP, and employing more than 394,000 Saskatchewan residents in 2015. With preferential access and greater transparency in the EU services market, there will be more secure and predictable market access in the areas of interest to Saskatchewan, such as construction services, as well as research and development services.

Currently, Saskatchewan is recognized as a world leader in agricultural biotechnology and life sciences, with cutting edge research centres spawning high-tech industries. An example of this is the Canadian Light Source synchrotron and Innovation Place research parks.

Through CETA, Saskatchewan and Canada will have preferential access, as well as greater transparency, in the EU services market, something that can only stand to benefit our research and development sector.

Saskatchewan is a vast province. In addition to agricultural exports of $15.1 billion in 2015, the province is gaining worldwide attention for its wealth of mineral and energy resources. Saskatchewan is Canada's second largest oil producing province, and the third largest natural gas producing province, making the oil and gas industry one of the largest contributors to the provincial economy, with sales of $15.9 billion in 2014. Despite the downturn in oil and gas prices, the industry remains integral to the economic well-being of the province.

For those who may not be aware, Saskatchewan is also a world leader in carbon capture and storage, with expertise in enhanced oil recovery. SaskPower, the province's power utility, has undertaken one of the world's largest carbon capture and storage projects at the Boundary Dam power station, located in my hometown of Estevan. This project is one of the first to develop and demonstrate carbon dioxide capture at a coal-fired power generation plant on a commercial scale, in part, because of the previous Conservati...”

Robert Kitchen (Conservative)

February 3rd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...tion.

I tell everyone in my riding that our province is an export province. It exports wheat, coal, gas, and potash. Many people have moved to other countries, but some have come back to the rid...”

Marilyn Gladu (Conservative)

February 2nd
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...arming. Sixty per cent of the footprint is the U.S., India, China, and Europe. China is building 24 coal plants. The U.S. has just said that it is reintroducing coal. India just built the biggest coal plant on the planet. If we are really serious about helping the planet, we should leverage Cana...”

Sonia Sidhu (Liberal)

February 2nd
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...ognize them:

The Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs; the World Sikh Organization of Canada; Coalition for Progressive Canadian Muslim Organizations; Canada India Foundation; Canadian Rabbinic ...”

Kim Rudd (Liberal)

February 2nd
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“...onomy, and create good middle-class jobs.

These actions include accelerating the phase-out of coal, developing a clean fuel standard, taking action on short-lived climate pollutants, and yes, pu...”

Jenny Kwan (NDP)

February 1st
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...to go out and try to save lives. That is what they are faced with. Imagine the stress.

The BC Coalition of Nursing Associations hosted an emergency forum on the nursing response to the opioid cr...”

Cathy McLeod (Conservative)

February 1st
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...zes that we have a real issue, especially my colleagues from British Columbia who are really at the coal face of this issue.

We just had a motion that would actually facilitate the vast majority...”

Cathy McLeod (Conservative)

January 31st
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“Mr. Speaker, I note that my colleague is from British Columbia, which is at the coalface of this crisis.

Back in April, British Columbia called a public state of emergency. Q...”

Colin Carrie (Conservative)

January 31st
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...sociation of Occupational Therapists, and the more than 50 organization members of the quality care coalition.

It is by working hard with organizations and bringing awareness to the need for pal...”

Marilyn Gladu (Conservative)

January 31st
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...iety, the Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists, more than 50 organization members of the Coalition for Quality Care, and many faith organizations, including the Canadian Conference of Catho...”

Sheila Malcolmson (NDP)

January 30th
Hansard Link

Routine Proceedings

“... commercial anchorages, each to house 300-metre-long vessels that are going to be exporting Wyoming coal to China, where it will be burned in power plants. Petitioners point out that this is bad for c...”

Rhéal Fortin (Bloc Québécois)

December 14th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...continue to speak out against government measures that are bad for Quebec. This government deserves coal in its stocking this Christmas.

All the same, my colleagues and I wish all Quebeckers and...”

Kerry Diotte (Conservative)

December 14th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...es, not pipe dreams; who want action, not broken promises. They deserve more than a Liberal lump of coal.

That said, I wish my constituents and all members of this House a very merry Christmas a...”

Stéphane Dion (Liberal)

December 14th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“....

Obviously, we have denounced those actions repeatedly, and we are not part of the the Saudi coalition. We want Saudi Arabia to honour its international obligations.”

Tracey Ramsey (NDP)

December 13th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...g process. The assessment makes really no mention of the impact of increased imports and exports of coal. We would like to get some more information on this, also at the committee level.

Unfortu...”

Jim Eglinski (Conservative)

December 13th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...n annually to Ukraine. Some of the top exports from western Canada included frozen hake, bituminous coal, reservoir tanks and similar containers, parts of boring or sinking machines for drilling, air compressors and other similar equipment, seeders and planters, and that which I think is most important, frozen pork. Why do I think frozen pork is so important? It is a staple food that Ukrainians like. I grew up with pork, probably more so than beef. On any given day, if you offer me a steak or a barbecued pork chop, I will leave the steak and take the pork. I see my heritage must still be with me.

Upon entry into force of the agreement, Ukraine will immediately eliminate tariffs on 75% of the tariff lines for industrial products, with a further 24.8% to become duty-free over seven years, making it 100% duty free in seven years.

According to Canadian government officials, the total back-and-forth trade between Canada and Ukraine averaged $350 million between 2011 and 2013, and slowed drastically during 2014, as Ukraine was dealing with a political upheaval and armed conflict in southern and eastern parts of the country.

The provisions of the agreement on free trade between Ukraine and Canada provide the deepening of trade and economic co-operation, including trade in industrial and agricultural goods, intellectual property protection, and regulation of public procurement.

The free trade agreement does not impact Canada's ability to maintain its existing supply management policy, as Canadian over-quota tariffs for supply management goods, being dairy, poultry and eggs, are excluded from the tariff concessions. (1320)

Total bilateral merchandise trade between Canada and the Ukraine averaged $289 million between 2011 and 2015. In 2015, it expanded by almost 20% as a result of the implementation of this trade.

Canada's GDP will increase by $29.2 million under CUFTA and the Ukraine's GDP will expand by $18.6 million.

As a result of this agreement, Canada's exports to the Ukraine will increase by $41.2 million. Canada's export gains will be broad-based, with exports of pork, machinery and equipment, transport equipment, other manufactured products, motor vehicles, parts, as well as chemical products leading the way.

The Ukrainian market offers many opportunities for Canadians, Canadian businesses, and investors in areas such as aerospace, agricultural equipment, information and communication technology, agriculture and agrifood, fish and seafood, and mining equipment.

The agriculture and agrifood sector employed over 530,000 people in 2014 in Canada and accounted for close to 3% of Canada's GDP. Canada is the world's fifth largest exporter of agriculture and agrifood products. Our agriculture exports to the Ukraine averaged almost $30 million between 2011 and 2013 each year.

The majority of Ukrainians who came to Canada in the late 1800s and early 1900s settled in western Canada and became farmers. They farmed the area and opened up the land. They homesteaded. It was not only Ukrainians. Germans, Italians, Dutch, and many others helped to open up Canada and make it such a prosperous agricultural nation.

Today, there are approximately 1.3 million Ukrainian descendants, the second largest population of Ukrainians in the world other than Ukraine itself. Many members said in the House that we would need to be friends but we are almost closer than friends in a lot of cases. We are family. When we talk about 1.3 million Canadians with ties to the Ukraine, we are talking families.

In 2015 alone, bilateral trade between Canada and Ukraine increased 14%. That shows that we have been growing every year since this agreement was first looked at.

Canadian exports include pharmaceuticals, fish and seafood, and coking coal. It is important to know that we both export and import coal.

It is also important to note that the Canada-Ukraine free trade agreement will generate ...”

Tom Kmiec (Conservative)

December 13th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... to go over some of those top exports from western Canada, where I am from: frozen hake, bituminous coal, reservoir tanks and similar containers, parts of boring or sinking machinery, air compressors ...”

Brian Masse (NDP)

December 13th
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“...ents, the current government and previous governments have used auto as basically the canary in the coal mine for many other industries.

I would point to the most recent agreement, the TPP, wher...”

Sheila Malcolmson (NDP)

December 12th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...gshore and Warehouse Union of Canada. He is also co-chair of the Canadian Maritime and Supply Chain Coalition.

I have heard the same concerns echoed by Graeme Johnston, the president of the BC F...”

John Barlow (Conservative)

December 12th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...me Minister's goal, While neglecting good-paying jobs like mining of coal; The surplus we left them was gone in a flash, ...”

Jonathan Wilkinson (Liberal)

December 12th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...n Friday. We have moved forward with a number of key environmental initiatives relating to methane, coal, hydrofluorocarbons, and the pricing of carbon pollution.

That is real change. That is wh...”

Rachel Blaney (NDP)

December 12th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...brings us back to my first point on pharmacare. According to Natalie Mehra, from the Ontario Health Coalition, the ability for investors to sue the government puts much more significant risk on the fe...”

Robert Kitchen (Conservative)

December 9th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, the Liberal announcement to expedite the phasing-out of coal-powered electricity has created panic in my riding. For over 10,000 residents, mainly in Corona...”

Garnett Genuis (Conservative)

December 8th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...tween Canada and Taiwan, the main exports from Canada to Taiwan include mineral oil, asphalt, wood, coal, nickel, meat, railway vehicles, and metal ore. Canada is Taiwan's 24th largest trading partner...”

Elizabeth May (Green Party)

December 7th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, representatives of the Coalition des citoyens de Lac-Mégantic are here in Ottawa today.

In 2013, the member for Papi...”

Peter Julian (NDP)

December 7th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...the member for Essex as a very strong member of Parliament who is actually a bit of a canary in the coal mine saying to the Liberal government it should not be ramming through this bill, they should b...”

Alexandra Mendès (Liberal)

December 6th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“... December 6, it is time to reflect on what progress has been made since. I want to mention here the Coalition for Gun Control, an organization that focuses on preventing gun-related crime.

With ...”

Pierre Nantel (NDP)

December 5th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...

As citizens, we must demand from all our elected officials an unwavering commitment within a coalition to make our region a champion. At a time when 37% of its young people are living under the poverty line, Longueuil badly needs the long-term jobs that will come with such a system of innovation.

It is with the people’s enthusiasm and support that I pledge to do everything in my power as an MP to build this coalition of elected officials so we can all work together tirelessly to bring these major forward-l...”

Robert Kitchen (Conservative)

December 5th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...try. We need them to show confidence in innovation and recognize the value of carbon capture to the coal and power industry. We need it to come now.

For these reasons, I cannot support this budg...”

Peter Van Loan (Conservative)

December 1st
Hansard Link

Business of Supply

“...identically followed that of the Communist Party in the Soviet Union. It started with a broad-based coalition that was a revolution against a government that was generally not supported by the people....”

Brad Trost (Conservative)

December 1st
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...The people of Saskatchewan want the Liberal government to end its war on Canadian oil, gas, and coal and instead focus on delivering clean air and clean water.”

Serge Cormier (Liberal)

December 1st
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“... award by the Conseil économique du Nouveau-Brunswick.

The business was founded in 1943 by a coalition of co-operatives that wanted to build a cold storage facility in Lamèque in order to proc...”

Sheri Benson (NDP)

November 30th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...no stranger to poverty, and there is a very high cost to poverty. In Saskatchewan, Poverty Costs, a coalition of community-based organizations, calculated that the economic cost of poverty in Saskatch...”

Arnold Viersen (Conservative)

November 29th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“... with an empty stocking, and on top of that, the Liberals will not even leave Canada with a lump of coal, because they are phasing that out too.

Rural Canadians are not on St. Nick's naughty lis...”

Tracey Ramsey (NDP)

November 29th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, last Friday, the U.S. Lumber Coalition filed a petition triggering what could be the start of yet another softwood lumber war, an...”

Brigitte Sansoucy (NDP)

November 29th
Hansard Link

Adjournment Proceedings

“...nthe has been in print since 1853. It is the oldest French newspaper in America and a member of the Coalition pour la pérennité de la presse d'information au Québec, which advocates on behalf of print newspapers. Most major newspapers in Quebec and Canada have agreed to ask for concrete programs to help them transition to the digital platform.

This Quebec print media coalition is asking the federal government to act. They want meaningful financial assistance, transitional support, financial support to help them gradually transition to digital without having to choose between bankruptcy and cutting thousands of jobs just to survive. They are acutely aware of the challenges that the digital shift poses every day, but they are also grappling with lower ad revenues.

During one of her consultations, the minister had this to say about print media:

I realize that major changes are affecting various media and the entire entertainment industry. As I have said many times, everything is on the table. I am ready to talk about the levers available to the federal government to support and promote those industries.

I wonder what they are waiting for. When will they do something to help?

The coalition asked, among other things, for a program or a tax credit to cover some of the print media'...”

Linda Duncan (NDP)

November 28th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...a, no jurisdiction has regulated the single largest source of mercury in North America, and that is coal-fired mercury. Lamps were included in the CCME list, but after coal-fired power and cement. It is very pleasing that the member opposite has chosen to finally seek...”

Robert Kitchen (Conservative)

November 28th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... words. Being from Saskatchewan, I know she understands what the Liberal government has done to the coal industry. It has created the potential for huge job losses in a town called Coronach, where the...”

Sheila Malcolmson (NDP)

November 25th
Hansard Link

Routine Proceedings

“...d tourism, and an overall concern that the anchorages are meant to facilitate the export of thermal coal from Wyoming to China and will have no benefit for people in the community. It is all downside ...”

Karen Vecchio (Conservative)

November 25th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ed in budget 2015, is necessary. Key stakeholders are onside with Bill C-25, including the Canadian Coalition for Good Governance and the Canadian Board Diversity Council.

I thank the Minister o...”

Linda Duncan (NDP)

November 24th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... able to survive. They need that connectivity.

I am charged by the fact that the Green Budget Coalition is asking for a green infrastructure definition that includes the protection of green area...”

Gary Anandasangaree (Liberal)

November 24th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...at predate me but are all nonetheless essential players, including the Save the Rouge Valley System coalition.

Most of the local politicians in Scarborough over the years have played a very impo...”

Tracey Ramsey (NDP)

November 24th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, tomorrow the U.S. Lumber Coalition is expected to file a formal complaint against Canadian producers. This will cause a major...”

François Choquette (NDP)

November 24th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ew national parks and marine protected areas.

If the recommendations of the 2017 Green Budget Coalition were accepted, we would have six national parks established by 2020, if memory serves. That would enable us to reach our targets, or at least come close.

Right now, the Liberals need to read the recommendations of the 2017 Green Budget Coalition. They contain many good ideas for achieving our conservation goals. Unfortunately, we are ...”

François Choquette (NDP)

November 24th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...conservation.

On the other hand, I am wondering where my colleague stands on the Green Budget Coalition’s recommendations, which include establishing at least six new national parks and three ...”

François Choquette (NDP)

November 24th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...s and 10% of marine areas by 2020. We are a long way from that.

In addition, the Green Budget Coalition stated that the federal government should establish six new parks, and nothing has been do...”

François Choquette (NDP)

November 24th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...o much more than just improve the Rouge Park in order to achieve the objectives of the Green Budget Coalition, which is calling for the creation of six new parks? What does my colleague think of this?...”


The Senate

Hon. Salma Ataullahjan

May 16th
Hansard Link

Dr. Zulfiqar Bhutta Congratulations on 2017 Oslo Business for Peace Award

“... oversight committee of World Health Organization Eastern Mediterranean Region, and Chairman of the Coalition of Centres in Global Child Health.

He holds adjunct professorships at Johns H...”

Senator Seidman

May 10th
Hansard Link

Tobacco Act Non-smokers' Health Act Bill to Amend—Third Reading—Debate Adjourned

“...on the best way to ensure youth are protected.

Last week we received an important letter from Coalition québécoise pour le contrôle du tabac. If I may briefly quote from their letter:

[...”

Hon. Amarjeet Sohi, P.C., M.P., Minister of Infrastructure and Communities

May 9th
Hansard Link

Ministry of Infrastructure and Communities Canada Infrastructure Bank

“...ral areas, where we could possibly build inter-provincial transmission ties to reduce dependency on coal-fired generation. That's where the opportunities exist. I am very confident that we will be abl...”

Hon. Serge Joyal

April 6th
Hansard Link

Battle of Vimy Ridge One Hundredth Anniversary

“...onghold used by the Germans to control the entire industrial region of the north of France, rich in coal mines that were essential to supporting the German war effort.

Twice before, in the years...”

Hon. Claude Carignan

April 6th
Hansard Link

Canada Evidence Act Criminal Code Bill to Amend—Third Reading—Debate Adjourned

“...to remind everyone why Bill S-231 is so important. Here is how Éric Trottier of the Canadian Media Coalition, an association of major Canadian media outlets, put it:

The current legislative framework is outdated. The proof of that is clear: warrants to put our journalists under surveillance can be obtained as they are investigating matters that do not constitute criminal acts, let alone serious ones. Nor do investigators have to justify violating the confidential nature of journalists' sources. Without guarantees against police intrusion, the protections provided by the Supreme Court mean nothing. So redressing the balance between police forces and the media is as necessary as it is urgent. The measures proposed in the bill re-establish this balance by tightening the procedure needed to obtain a surveillance warrant. . . .

Honourable senators, for the sake of the public interest, we must strike a balance between police investigative powers and protecting sources acting in the public interest and in everyone's interest.

Let me explain why Bill S-231 is so important.

I agree with the report adopted yesterday, which included all of the amendments proposed and adopted during the committee's study. The amendments seek to restore that important balance between investigative powers and protection of sources.

As you know, freedom of the press is one of our fundamental values in Canada. It is enshrined in the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Our role in the Senate is to ensure that our laws are consistent with the Constitution, and to uphold the democratic values and rights and freedoms of all. It is also our role to set safeguards. Off-loading that responsibility to the courts might cause these violations of the freedom of the press to endure for several more years.

Honourable senators, recent events give us cause for concern for this freedom of the press that is fundamental to our democracy. Freedom of the press and journalistic sources go hand in hand. Journalistic sources are essential to investigative journalism. Michael Cooke of the Toronto Star told us, and I quote:

Often if the story is important enough to the public interest, we get a public inquiry, or we get a criminal probe, or we get a change of our law. Sometimes we get all three, which is a glorious trifecta demonstrating the value of our free press.

Bill S-231 seeks to protect the confidentiality of journalistic sources, also known as whistle-blowers. It enshrines in Canadian law, for the first time in history, a class privilege, that of guaranteed anonymity of a journalistic source. This type of legislation already exists in several countries around the world. The Fédération professionnelle des journalistes du Québec was quite clear; according to the largest organization of journalists in the country, Canada is lagging behind when it comes to protecting sources.

Journalistic sources are necessary for holding government to account to the public. Without them, historic scandals such as "Shawinigate" or the sponsorship scandal would have never seen the light of day. Journalistic sources disclose irregularities, fraud, or misuse of public funds at great risk. If their identity is revealed, they are vulnerable to threats, exclusion, disciplinary action, intimidation, job loss, and in some cases physical retaliation and even death threats. Hence the importance of not only a bond of trust between the journalist and source, but also of a legal framework to put safeguards in place.

Investigative journalism is based on a relationship that is founded on the trust of the sources. Society as a whole suffers when the relationship between journalists and their sources is threatened, because we depend on sources if we are to shed light on issues of great public importance.

I introduced Bill S-231 in response to disturbing revelations that the Montreal police service and the Sûreté du Québec allegedly placed numerous journalists under surveillance. The police apparently obtained warrants giving access to journalists' cellphone and geolocation data. Following these disturbing revelations, a number of journalists told us in committee that their sources were panicking and no longer wanted to cooperate, or were changing their methods of contact to better protect themselves.

In recent days, we have also learned that devices for tracking our own cellphones had been set up around Parliament Hill, making it possible to intercept our communications and text messages.

It seems that Public Safety Canada is investigating this illegal interception and who is responsible for installing these catcher devices. How far do we have to tolerate these intrusions into our telephone communications and text messages? We certainly need to draw the line when our democratic institutions are concerned. The media is one of those institutions and needs special protection.

(1700)

If we want to guarantee freedom of the press, honourable senators, it is our duty to take action. This bill has received considerable support from members of the essential institution that is the media and freedom of the press. La Presse, CBC/ Radio-Canada, The Globe and Mail, The Toronto Star, and journalism associations support this bill without reservation.

I would now like to address some of its important elements.

Concerning the Canada Evidence Act, first, Bill S-231 defines journalist and journalistic source. The new version of the subclause, proposed by Senator Pratte, tightens the definition of what a journalist is by requiring that two criteria be met: main occupation and for consideration. This addresses a concern expressed by police about how the provisions would be enforced, from a practical perspective.

As Senator Pratte said, the amendment is intended to limit the definition of journalist to persons whose main occupation is journalism, if it is a paid occupation. This will provide the police with a more precise definition. That will enable them to enforce the new legislation more easily than under the former definition, which was broader and harder to interpret.

Only professional journalists would be covered by this legislation. We made this compromise in order to address police concerns. This is a significant compromise and a reasonable balance, seeking to reconcile the interests of the police, who want to investigate, and journalists, who want to be able to do their work without jeopardizing their sources' safety.

In short, with these amendments, we have tried to strike a fair and reasonable balance between the investigative power of the police and the search for the truth by protecting journalistic sources. We have done it with the fact in mind that Canada is one of the rare democracies in the world that does not have this kind of legislative protection. Without clear legislation, both police and judges are left to the vagaries of the case law. A case by case approach is not desirable in relation to the investigative powers of the police. Relying on the case law, in the increasingly complex world of communications and at a time when the profession of journalist is in a state of change, is not acceptable, and would mean tolerating violations for several years to come. It would amount to off-loading onto the courts our primary responsibility to protect our public institutions.

In proposed subsection 39.1(3), the bill also provides that a journalist may object to the disclosure of information or a document before a court, person or body with the authority to compel. The objection may be made on the grounds that the information or document identifies or is likely to identify a journalistic source.

Proposed subsection 39.1(7) provides that the court or body may authorize the disclosure of information or a document only if the court considers that the information or document cannot be obtained by any other reasonable means, and the public interest in the administration of justice outweighs the public interest in preserving the confidentiality of the journalistic source. There are therefore exceptional, grave and serious situations where the public interest will dictate that the protection must be lifted and the source's identity disclosed. In other cases, the public interest will dictate that anonymity must be maintained.

The court or body must have regard, first, to the essential role of the information or document; second, to freedom of the press; and third, to the impact of disclosure on the journalistic source and the journalist. Bill S-231 thus codifies the criteria that have already been established in decisions of the Supreme Court.

Proposed subsection 39.1(8) places the burden of proof on the person who requests disclosure.

With respect to the Criminal Code, section 3 governs the judicial process relating to the warrant, search warrant, and order. As you now know, the new version of subsection 488.01(3.1) gives the judge discretion, on the judge's own motion, to appoint a special advocate — what is commonly called an amicus curiae. The special advocate would present observations when the application was made for the warrant, but only when a judge considered it to be necessary. That amendment was requested by a large proportion of the committee members, in response to an amendment proposed by witnesses.

To quote the Canadian Media Coalition, a special advocate could, and I quote:

. . . after reviewing the disclosure, make the necessary representations to the judge. This exercise would allow the judge to get a fuller picture of the situation and to benefit from the special enlightenment provided by a lawyer who is experienced in this particular field of the law.

In short, this amendment would give the judge a better picture of the situation and access to expertise in journalism, which would help him or her understand what journalists are within their rights to do or not do.

[English]

In the words of one of the important witnesses, Ms. Jennifer McGuire, General Manager and Editor in Chief of CBC News, an amicus curiae "could, after reviewing the disclosure, make the necessary representations to the judge. By accepting our suggestions, you can strike a better balance in achieving the core promise of this draft bill, protecting journalistic sources, while giving police the tools they need to do their jobs."

[Translation]

Senators, the amicus curiae will constitute an additional way of maintaining the investigative powers of the police.

In addition to that, the bill also narrows the definition of "journalist" in order to prevent the police from dealing with uncertainty when seeking and enforcing warrants.

Under proposed subsection 488.01(2), a search warrant, an authorization or an order relating to a journalistic source may be issued only by a judge of a superior court of criminal jurisdiction or by a judge within the meaning of section 552. That includes judges of the criminal division of the Court of Quebec.

This change increases the requirements for ruling on an issue as basic as the authorization of a search warrant. A search warrant, an authorization or an order may be issued only if, in addition to the required conditions, the judge is satisfied that:

(a) there is no other way by which the desired information can reasonably be obtained;

(b) the public interest in the investigation and prosecution of a criminal offence outweighs the journalist's right to privacy in the process.

These criteria weigh heavily and will ensure that, just because one is a journalist doesn't mean he or she is above the law.

Under new subsection 488.02(1), once the investigation is complete, all information obtained pursuant to a warrant, authorization or order is to be sealed by the court, and no one is to have access to it without authorization from the judge.

An officer who asks to examine or make copies of any documents that have been sealed must give the journalist and relevant media outlet notice of his or her intention under subsection 488.02(2). The journalist and relevant media outlet has 10 days to oppose the request for disclosure from an officer on the grounds that the document identifies or is likely to identity a journalistic source.

The judge may order the disclosure of a document only if he or she is satisfied that there is no other way by which the information can reasonably be obtained. Furthermore, the public interest must take precedence over the right of journalists to confidentiality. It is incumbent upon the Crown to convince the court that the information is vital to an investigation under way.

(1710)

Journalists and their sources benefitted somewhat from the ruling in the Globe and Mail case. Today, with Bill S-231, their rights will be strengthened by legislation.

The confidential relationship between journalists and their anonymous sources must have a certain form of legal protection.

[English]

Confidential sources are key to the "responsible performance of the media's role" and "ought to be protected," said Justice Abella in the National Post decision.

[Translation]

We are trying to strike a fair and reasonable balance between the investigative powers of police and the search for truth made possible by protecting journalistic sources. We should bear in mind that Canada is one of the few democracies that does not have legislation in this regard.

Without clear legislation, the police and judges are working in a grey area. Is the case-by-case approach advisable for the investigative powers of police? The answer is definitely no. Relying on case law in a world where communications are increasingly complex and the profession of journalism is quickly changing is not acceptable.

Police officers told us that we do not need this legislation. I beg to differ.

Mr. Trottier, associate editor and vice-president, Information, of La Presse and member of the Canadian Media Coalition, was very clear on the existence of such abuses by police forces. He said:

...”

Senator Joyal

April 4th
Hansard Link

Canada Evidence Act Criminal Code Bill to Amend—Thirteenth Report of Legal and Constitutional Affairs Committee Adopted

“...to list just a few names of the witnesses that we had the opportunity to hear. We had, of course, a coalition of Canadian media, including the Toronto Star, the National Post, The Globe and Mail, French CBC, English CBC, Le Devoir, Canadian Journalists for Free Expression, la Fédération professionnelle des journalistes du Québec. We heard also from representatives of the Canadian Council of Criminal Defence Lawyers, from lawyers from the firm Gowling. We also heard lawyers from Canadian Media Lawyers Association. We heard the Canadian Police Association and the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police, plus, of course, experts from the university community and, of course, authors and retired journalists.

The committee had an extensive opportunity to delve into the proposed legislation. Your committee comes forward with five groups of amendments. The first amendment deals essentially with the definition of journalist. The original definition of journalist didn't contain the elements of restitution or the elements of, I should say, pay that are essential to try to circumscribe the group of journalists that would be covered by the bill.

For the purposes of the bill, we proposed that the definition of journalist include "a person whose main occupation is to contribute directly, either regularly or occasionally, for consideration." The word "consideration" is very important. Consideration can be anything, of course: It could be money, it could be access to certain benefits and it could be compensation of any sort.

(1520)

The essential element of the definition is an individual who is a journalist, as I say, who contributes directly, either regularly or occasionally, for consideration to the collection and dissemination of information. That is the first amendment, and it stems from the representation we had from the police associations and, of course, from the coalition of news media. So it's essentially the expression of that preoccupation they had.

The second amendment is in relation to extending the journalist protection to those who were journalists when a situation happened and they chose not to reveal their sources. So in other words, it would extend the definition of journalist to those who have been journalists in the past but might find themselves in another professional capacity or who have ceased to be a journalist.

The third amendment, and my personal comment in relation to it is I think it is an important one, states that when a court has to authorize the disclosure of information, the bill provides that there be two elements that the court would consider, and your committee is adding a third one. That third element is essentially that due consideration was given to all means of disclosure that would preserve the identity of the journalistic source.

In other words, when a person seeks to authorize the disclosure, it has to pay due consideration to all other means of disclosure that would have preserved the journalistic source. The authorization to disclose the journalist's source comes only when we have spent all other ways to provide the source.

The fourth amendment is essentially to extend the warrant procedure to those of a general purpose. The list of the bills included search warrants and other warrants provided in the code but not the general warrant of section 487.01; section 487 was essentially the amendment that we made.

Finally, the last amendment was also requested by the coalition of media, which is essentially that when a judge is requested to issue a warrant, he or sh...”

Hon. Michael L. MacDonald

March 28th
Hansard Link

National Strategy for Safe and Environmentally Sound Disposal of Lamps Containing Mercury Bill Second Reading

“... their energy efficiency, there is a reduced demand for electrical generation in areas dependent on coal power plants. Coal power generation, still utilized in my home province of Nova Scotia, for example, releases merc...”

Hon. Salma Ataullahjan

March 9th
Hansard Link

Prohibiting Cluster Munitions Act Bill to Amend—Second Reading—Debate Adjourned

“...ed and destroyed.

In June 2016, PAX, a Dutch peace group who form a part of the international coalition against indiscriminate weapons, reported that four Canadian financial institutions had inv...”

Hon. Murray Sinclair

March 7th
Hansard Link

Criminal Code Bill to Amend—Second Reading—Debate Continued

“...anadians agreed that spanking should be illegal. The Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario leads a coalition of over 580 national organizations and advocates. That coalition released a Joint Statement on Physical Punishment of Children and Youth and also called fo...”

Hon. Peter Harder (Government Representative in the Senate)

February 28th
Hansard Link

International Development Programs and Initiatives

“...precisely how the Government of Canada will augment its contribution in this area to be part of the coalition of countries to fill this important need.”

Hon. Lynn Beyak

February 28th
Hansard Link

Canadian Human Rights Act Criminal Code Bill to Amend—Second Reading—Debate Continued

“... began, or which we worked on together. In 1990, with other businessmen, Tony founded the Taxpayers Coalition of Fort Frances, and saved local citizens and businesses millions of dollars in taxes over...”

Hon. Marilou McPhedran

February 14th
Hansard Link

Speech from the Throne Motion for Address in Reply—Debate Continued

“...rights under CEDAW. Over 100 Canadian civil society organizations made their voices heard through a coalition coordinated by the Feminist Alliance for International Action, or FAFIA. The CEDAW committ...”

Hon. Claude Carignan (Leader of the Opposition)

February 9th
Hansard Link

National Defence Taxable Measures for Armed Forces Members in Kuwait

“...of Canadian Forces members participating in Operation IMPACT, which is Canada's contribution to the coalition to dismantle and defeat Daesh.

Last fall, Canadian soldiers stationed at a U.S. base...”

Senator Carignan

February 9th
Hansard Link

National Defence Taxable Measures for Armed Forces Members in Kuwait

“...ce you plan on asking for information, could you also ask whether Canada is the only country in the coalition against Daesh that does not treat all its soldiers equally in terms of tax exemptions?”

Hon. Diane Griffin

February 9th
Hansard Link

Literacy on Prince Edward Island Inquiry—Debate Continued

“...s not sustainable.

As part of the Government of Canada Pre-Budget Consultations, the literacy coalitions of P.E.I., Nova Scotia and New Brunswick made a joint submission addressing the importanc...”

Hon. Claude Carignan (Leader of the Opposition)

December 14th
Hansard Link

Environment and Climate Change Energy Targets—Energy Alternatives

“...the ambitious targets set at the 2015 Paris Climate Conference more quickly by reducing the use of coal as an energy source.

Minister, do you believe that natural gas is a desirable transitional energy source? Should we encourage heavy energy consumers to use natural gas instead of coal? With that in mind, should we encourage Canadian provinces to develop their shale gas producti...”

Hon. Catherine McKenna, P.C., M.P., Minister of Environment and Climate Change

December 14th
Hansard Link

Environment and Climate Change Carbon Pricing—Competitiveness

“...across the country, as do the business leaders who have signed on to our Carbon Pricing Leadership Coalition. These are the biggest businesses in Canada, including the major energy companies, many b...”

Hon. Catherine McKenna, P.C., M.P., Minister of Environment and Climate Change

December 14th
Hansard Link

Environment and Climate Change Carbon Tax

“... Moe. I was very pleased about advances we were able to make with respect to an early phase-out of coal and finding an equivalency agreement.

Saskatchewan is committed to most elements of our...”

Hon. Paul E. McIntyre

December 14th
Hansard Link

Environment and Climate Change New Brunswick—Climate Change Plan

“...al government announced its climate change plan. Included in that plan was the pledge to phase out coal as the source of electricity. As you know, the only coal-burning power plant in New Brunswick is located in Belledune. However, there is a condition attached to the plan, the condition being that the province receives the necessary support from other partners, such as the federal government, NB Power, and local stakeholders. That said, could you inform us if your government is in the process of negotiating a package deal with New Brunswick that will determine the future of the Belledune coal-burning power plant? If so, what will the package include? Will it include green infrastructu...”

Hon. Catherine McKenna, P.C., M.P., Minister of Environment and Climate Change

December 14th
Hansard Link

Environment and Climate Change New Brunswick—Climate Change Plan

“Thank you, honourable senator. I was very pleased that we were able to work with the four coal-burning provinces to find agreements with all of them and a path forward. We've had many discu...”

Hon. Michael L. MacDonald

December 14th
Hansard Link

Environment and Climate Change United States—Carbon Tax

“Thank you, minister, for being here. I must say, as somebody who witnessed China build 230 coal-fired plants last year, it's great to see they've changed their tune on this matter.

Ou...”

Hon. Catherine McKenna, P.C., M.P., Minister of Environment and Climate Change

December 14th
Hansard Link

Environment and Climate Change United States—Carbon Tax

“... that, in terms of China, they've just announced that they're going to put a cap on emissions from coal. They are the single largest investor in Canadian solar; a Canadian company is doing extraordi...”

Senator Lankin

December 13th
Hansard Link

Tobacco Act Non-smokers' Health Act Bill to Amend—Second reading—Debate Adjourned

“...izations such as the Non- Smokers' Rights Association, Physicians for a Smoke-Free Canada, Ontario Coalition for Action on Tobacco and Quebec Coalition for Tobacco Control.

Along with the correspondence they have attached a confidential presentation from Imperial Tobacco, which was leaked by an industry whistle-blower. The documentation suggests that organizations such as Canadian Convenience Stores Association and the National Coalition Against Contraband Tobacco are active lobbying organizations which have relationships wit...”

Hon. Yonah Martin (Acting Leader of the Opposition)

December 2nd
Hansard Link

Prime Minister's Office Visit of the Vice President of the United States—Softwood Lumber

“... which the Liberal government has so far failed to provide.

On November 25, the U.S. Lumber Coalition filed a petition with the United States government to impose duties on Canadian softwood ...”

Hon. Daniel Lang

December 1st
Hansard Link

Study on Issues Related to the Government's Current Defence Policy Review Seventh Report of National Security and Defence Committee and Request for Government Response—Debate Adjourned

“...presently deployed on UN missions. In addition, more than 1,000 military personnel are deployed on Coalition and NATO missions in Iraq, Syria and Ukraine, and an additional 455 members of the milita...”

Hon. Pierre-Hugues Boisvenu

November 24th
Hansard Link

Quebec Sex Offender Registry

“Honourable senators, on Friday, November 18, André Spénard and Nathalie Roy, members of Coalition Avenir Québec, introduced, for the first time, in the Quebec National Assembly, a motion...”


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