CRTC: The Last Six Months
Of Federal Activity

About

This Report

This is a computer-generated report that shows all of the federal activity with respect to the keyword "CRTC" over the last six months. This is a demonstration of the power of our government relations automation software.

Hansard

House: 19 Speeches
Senate: 0 Speeches

House

Bills

Active: 0

Regulations

Filed: 1
Proposed: 0

Regulations

The House

Mr. Joël Godin (Portneuf—Jacques-Cartier, CPC)

December 13th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“... 2018 and thousands of Canadians still do not have access to broadband Internet.

In 2016, the CRTC stated that access to broadband Internet services is vital to Canada's economic, social, democr...”

Ms. Ruth Ellen Brosseau (Berthier—Maskinongé, NDP)

December 13th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“..., residents like Gilles Auclair and Sylvie Legault do not even have Internet service that meets the CRTC's minimum standards. The Liberals need to do more for our rural regions.

When is the gove...”

Hon. Denis Paradis (Brome—Missisquoi, Lib.)

December 12th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...e, and we discussed what needs to be done to move forward quickly, including the involvement of the CRTC.

I want to point out that IHR Télécom was among the first to receive federal and provinci...”

Mr. Brian Masse (Windsor West, NDP)

December 12th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...es, restrictions when switching Internet providers and misleading aggressive telecom practices. The CRTC says it wants to establish a consumer Internet code of conduct, but has failed to provide sufficient time for consumer groups and the public. The result is a boycotted and broken system. Consumer groups have been clear. They want an extension so they can participate.

Why is the Prime Minister allowing the CRTC to make up a toothless code of conduct for consumers in Canada?”

Right Hon. Justin Trudeau (Prime Minister, Lib.)

December 12th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, we are proud of the work we are doing with the CRTC to ensure that our digital programming and protection of our airwaves keep pace with the transformations of our economy. We recognize there is more and more need for data and for proper access to broadband. That is something we are continuing to invest in across the country and work with the CRTC on, although it is odd to see the NDP members complaining about this when they are the ones who...”

Mr. Brian Masse (Windsor West, NDP)

December 7th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Madam Speaker, the CRTC has launched proceedings to create an Internet code of conduct to protect consumers.

The problem is that without warning and little notice, it has put the public and experts on an impossible timeline to contribute meaningful input. Even worse, the CRTC is withholding crucial information to allow experts to do their job. The CRTC's irrational approach has become a debacle.

Are the Liberals really serious about consumer protection, or is this process smoke and mirrors? Will the minister extend the deadline to allow the public and experts reasonable time to make submissions to the CRTC and ensure that a code of conduct is done properly?”

Mr. David Lametti (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development, Lib.)

December 7th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Madam Speaker, the CRTC has a long track record of consulting Canadians and working well within the areas of its jurisd...”

Mr. Dan Ruimy

November 29th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...e invested $500 million in the connect to innovate program, which helped quite a bit. I believe the CRTC has also invested another $750 million. However, it cannot end there.

When we did our com...”

Ms. Cheryl Hardcastle (Windsor—Tecumseh, NDP)

November 29th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ies. In the fall economic update, there is no mention of new obligations, let alone funding for the CRTC to maintain its existing responsibilities. This is unfair, and it is insulting to Canadians who are waiting for implementation of Bill C-81.

Why will the Liberals not take their responsibilities seriously and ensure that institutions like the CRTC are accessible to everyone?”

Ms. Cheryl Hardcastle (Windsor—Tecumseh, NDP)

November 22nd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ands of the accessibility commissioner and not splintered across various organizations, such as the CRTC and CTA, groups that, as was pointed out numerous times, had a storied record of implementing the few accessibility obligations they already had, never mind new ones. However, as the testimony concluded, it was as if no one had uttered a single world. Not one of these recommendations was taken up by the government.

Despite what the minister clearly said, the Liberals had already decided what they were going to do. Despite this, they nevertheless expended the treasury and witness efforts to bring experts to Ottawa to provide testimony that the government had already chosen to ignore. The Liberals ignored the excellent testimony from a former provincial Liberal minister, the highly respected Marie Bountrogianni, a person with actual experience implementing expansive accessibility legislation.

Let us hear some of this. Ms. Bountrogianni said:

During the consultation phase, we studied Great Britain's Disability Discrimination Act and were taught three critical lessons. We would need a clear deadline for an accessible Ontario. There would need to be regulations established through which to enforce the law, and public education would be key for creating awareness about the bill.

When I was studying them, it was from their challenges. I don't want to use the word “mistakes” because they were pioneers. They were Great Britain, Australia and the United States. They told me, “Have a timeline, definitely have timelines.” (1540)

How can this testimony be ignored? It is a shame. I get frustrated just thinking about it. All of the expertise and people so succinctly explaining to us what needed to be done to bolster the legislation was ignored.

I cannot stress enough that another critical issue is the way in which Bill C-81 splinters the power to enforce the legislation among four federal organizations: the accessibility commissioner, the Canadian Transportation Agency, also known as the CTA; the CRTC, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission; and the tribunal that regulat...”

Mr. John Barlow (Foothills, CPC)

November 22nd
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...currently a bit confusing in terms of where these complaints go. Some complaints may go directly to CRTC, the Canadian Human Rights Commission, CTA or then, fourth, to the accessibility commissioner o...”

Hon. Carla Qualtrough

November 21st
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... obligated entities would have to create their first set of regulations within two years. Thus, the CRTC, the CTA and the accessibility commissioner would have to put forth their first set of regulati...”

Hon. Carla Qualtrough

November 21st
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ave expertise within government organizations. We have complicated regulatory frameworks within the CRTC and the CTA. We have a Canadian Human Rights Commission that is very well respected and that do...”

Mr. Dan Albas (Central Okanagan—Similkameen—Nicola, CPC)

October 19th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, two years ago, the CRTC announced that a 50-megabyte download speed Internet is a basic service all Canadians should ha...”

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes (Whitby, Lib.)

September 24th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...pliant. The bill grants the accessibility commissioner, the Canadian Transportation Agency, and the CRTC the powers of inspection and investigation. How important are these powers to ensure there is c...”

Ms. Sheri Benson (Saskatoon West, NDP)

September 24th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ewed independently.

Both the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission, the CRTC, and the Canadian Transportation Agency remain in the frame around enforcement. To my earlier p...”

Mr. Nick Whalen (St. John's East, Lib.)

September 24th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... and to expand the powers and responsibilities of the Canadian Transportation Agency as well as the CRTC in relation to accessibility. The Canadian Transportation Agency would continue to be responsible for the accessibility of passengers in the federal transportation network, with an enhanced mandate, responsibilities and powers. The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission would continue to be responsible for accessibility in relation to broadcasting and telecommunication services with new responsibilities for overseeing accessibility plans, feedback processes and progress reports.

Through amendments to the Canada Transportation Act, the Canadian Transportation Agency would have new proactive compliance tools to ensure that those in the federal transportation network are meeting their accessibility obligations. These compliance tools would be very similar to those of the accessibility commissioner, including the ability to issue notices for violations, with fines again up to $250,000. Given the whole-of-government approach to ensuring the removal of barriers in federal jurisdiction, the bill requires that the various authorities put in place mechanisms for collaboration and coordination across organizations regarding their policies and practices in relation to accessibility.

In terms of remedies, although the focus of Bill C-81 is on proactive and systemic change, the bill also provides for complaints mechanisms for individuals who have been harmed by an organization's non-compliance with its accessibility obligations.

Bill C-81 provides individuals with a right to file complaints with the accessibility commissioner if they have been harmed or have suffered property damage or economic loss as a result of, or have otherwise been adversely affected by, the contravention by an entity of regulations made under the proposed accessibility act. If, after investigating a complaint, the accessibility commissioner finds that the complaint is substantiated, the commissioner could order a broad range of remedies, including that the entity that committed the contravention take appropriate corrective measures; make available to the complainant the rights, opportunities or privileges that they were denied; pay compensation to the complainant for wages they were deprived of, and for expenses incurred by them as a result of the contravention; pay compensation to the complainant for the additional costs of obtaining alternative goods, services, facilities or accommodation as a result of the contravention; pay compensation for any pain and suffering the complainant experienced; and pay the complainant an amount if the accessibility commissioner determines that the contravention is the result of a wilful or reckless practice.

The maximum amount that could be awarded for each of pain and suffering and wilful and reckless practice would initially be set at $20,000, but Bill C-81 includes a provision that would increase these amounts over time to account for inflation. If individuals and organizations think that the accessibility commissioner made an error in dismissing a complaint or in ordering a remedy, they would be able to make an appeal. For most complaints, these appeals would go to the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal. For complaints about parliamentary entities, appeals would go to the Federal Public Sector Labour Relations and Employment Board.

The accessibility commissioner would not be responsible for dealing with all complaints, however. In recognition of, and to leverage, the existing expertise of the Canadian Transportation Agency and the CRTC, these organizations would be responsible for dealing with complaints in the federal passenger transportation network and in respect of the Broadcasting Act and Telecommunications Act, respectively.

Through the amendments to the Canada Transportation Act proposed in Bill C-81, the Canadian Transportation Agency would continue to deal with complaints in relation to undue barriers to the mobility of persons with disabilities in the federal transportation network, with enhanced remedies, such as compensation for pain and suffering, which would be better aligned with the remedies available under the Canadian Human Rights Act.

The Canadian Transportation Agency would also deal with a new type of complaint that addresses contraventions of regulations made under the Canada Transportation Act that result in harm, similar to complaints made to the accessibility commissioner under the proposed accessible canada act, with similar remedies for individuals.

For complaints about broadcasting and telecommunications services, Canadians would continue to file complaints with the CRTC, which would use its existing authorities under the Broadcasting Act and the Telecommunications...”

Hon. Peter Van Loan (York—Simcoe, CPC)

September 24th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... so successful for centuries.

Now, returning to the bill, clause 51 addresses the role of the CRTC in the area of information and communication technologies. This provides me the opportunity to ...”

Ms. Cheryl Hardcastle (Windsor—Tecumseh, NDP)

September 19th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...of the bill, for example, empowers the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission, CRTC, to totally exempt any obligated organization it wishes within its mandate from any or all of the accessibility plan requirements. Worse still, the bill provides no means by which persons with disabilities can register their concerns before a decision is made to grant an exemption. This is deeply troubling.

Also problematic is that another section of Bill C-81 gives the federal cabinet the power to make regulations that can exempt any obligated organizations from a wide range of obligations under the act. The bill would allow cabinet to do this, and it need not provide any reasons when it does. Seriously, if cabinet is allowed to do this, why are we here today?

I also find it perplexing that while the bill requires obligated organizations to establish accessibility plans, it does not require these plans to be good plans. It does not require an obligated organization to implement its accessibility plan. This is curiouser and curiouser.

Potentially quite troubling is a situation created in section 172 whereby a regulation created by the Canadian Transportation Agency for example, without debate, could end up trumping obligations under the Canadian Human Rights Act. It should be a basic principle of Bill C-81 that no provisions therein supersede any human rights. This is a perfect example of some of the technical issues that need to be addressed, and I want our stakeholders who understand the impact of this troublesome section to know that we will seek to have it removed.

The bill likewise separates enforcement and implementation in a confusing way over a tangle of different public enforcement agencies rather than providing people with disabilities with the simple one-stop enforcement they need. The CRTC will provide enforcement for its obligated organizations and so too will the Canadian Transportation Agency. (1635)

The bill does this, despite the reality that both the CRTC and the CTA have an unsatisfactory track record when it comes to enforcing accessibility over m...”


Filed Regulations

Order Declining to Set Aside or Refer Back to the CRTC Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2018-238: SI/2018-93

2018 October 17,
BROADCASTING ACT
Gazette Link

“...Order Declining to Set Aside or Refer Back to the CRTC Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2018-238: SI/2018-93

Canada Gazette, Part II, Volume 152, Number 21

Registration

October 17, 2018

BROADCASTING ACT

Order Declining to Set Aside or Refer Back to the CRTC Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2018-238

P.C. 2018-1244 October 3, 2018

Whereas the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (“Commission”), in its Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2018-238 of July 11, 2018 (“decision”), made a decision to issue a broadcasting licence to Frank Torres, on behalf of a corporat...”

“...ck to the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission for reconsideration and hearing the decision contained in Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2018-238 of July 11, 2018 to issue a broadcasting licence to Frank Torres, on behalf of a corporation to be incorporated, to operate a ...”

“...ct, requesting the Governor in Council to refer back for reconsideration and hearing the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) decision contained in Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2018-238 of July 11, 2018, to issue a broadcasting licence to Frank Torres, on behalf of a corporation to be incorporated (Torres), to opera...”

“...station to serve Georgina, Ontario.

Objective

To communicate that the Governor in Council is declining to set aside or refer back to the CRTC for reconsideration and hearing the decision to issue a broadcasting licence to Torres to operate a new commercial FM radio station to serve Georgina, Ontario.

Background

On April 13, 2017, the CRTC issued a call for applications for a broadcasting licence to operate a radio station to serve Georgina, Ontario.

On November 28, 2017, the CRTC held a public hearing to consider applications for new radio stations to serve that location.

On July 11, 2018, the CRTC issued Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2018-238, which contained a decision to grant a broadcasting licence to Torres to operate a new commercial FM radio station to serve Georgina, On...”

“...oadcasting Act.

Pursuant to section 28 of the Broadcasting Act, the Governor in Council may set aside or refer a decision back to the CRTC for reconsideration and hearing if the Governor in Council is satisfied that the decision derogates from the attainment of the objectives of the ...”

“... objectives.

Therefore, under section 28 of the Broadcasting Act, the Governor in Council has declined to set aside or refer back to the CRTC for reconsideration and hearing the decision contained in Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2018-238 of July 11, 2018, to issue a broadcasting licence to Torres to operate a new commercial FM radio station to serve Georgina, Ontario.

Implications

As a result, the CRTC decision stands.

Departmental contact

Thomas Owen Ripley Director General Broadcasting and Digital Communications Branch Departmen...”


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