CRTC: The Last Six Months
Of Federal Activity

About

This Report

This is a computer-generated report that shows all of the federal activity with respect to the keyword "CRTC" over the last six months. This is a demonstration of the power of our government relations automation software.

Hansard

House: 12 Speeches
Senate: 2 Speeches

House Senate

Bills

Active: 0

Regulations

Filed: 0
Proposed: 0

The House

Mrs. Celina Caesar-Chavannes (Whitby, Lib.)

September 24th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...pliant. The bill grants the accessibility commissioner, the Canadian Transportation Agency, and the CRTC the powers of inspection and investigation. How important are these powers to ensure there is c...”

Ms. Sheri Benson (Saskatoon West, NDP)

September 24th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...ewed independently.

Both the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission, the CRTC, and the Canadian Transportation Agency remain in the frame around enforcement. To my earlier p...”

Mr. Nick Whalen (St. John's East, Lib.)

September 24th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... and to expand the powers and responsibilities of the Canadian Transportation Agency as well as the CRTC in relation to accessibility. The Canadian Transportation Agency would continue to be responsible for the accessibility of passengers in the federal transportation network, with an enhanced mandate, responsibilities and powers. The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission would continue to be responsible for accessibility in relation to broadcasting and telecommunication services with new responsibilities for overseeing accessibility plans, feedback processes and progress reports.

Through amendments to the Canada Transportation Act, the Canadian Transportation Agency would have new proactive compliance tools to ensure that those in the federal transportation network are meeting their accessibility obligations. These compliance tools would be very similar to those of the accessibility commissioner, including the ability to issue notices for violations, with fines again up to $250,000. Given the whole-of-government approach to ensuring the removal of barriers in federal jurisdiction, the bill requires that the various authorities put in place mechanisms for collaboration and coordination across organizations regarding their policies and practices in relation to accessibility.

In terms of remedies, although the focus of Bill C-81 is on proactive and systemic change, the bill also provides for complaints mechanisms for individuals who have been harmed by an organization's non-compliance with its accessibility obligations.

Bill C-81 provides individuals with a right to file complaints with the accessibility commissioner if they have been harmed or have suffered property damage or economic loss as a result of, or have otherwise been adversely affected by, the contravention by an entity of regulations made under the proposed accessibility act. If, after investigating a complaint, the accessibility commissioner finds that the complaint is substantiated, the commissioner could order a broad range of remedies, including that the entity that committed the contravention take appropriate corrective measures; make available to the complainant the rights, opportunities or privileges that they were denied; pay compensation to the complainant for wages they were deprived of, and for expenses incurred by them as a result of the contravention; pay compensation to the complainant for the additional costs of obtaining alternative goods, services, facilities or accommodation as a result of the contravention; pay compensation for any pain and suffering the complainant experienced; and pay the complainant an amount if the accessibility commissioner determines that the contravention is the result of a wilful or reckless practice.

The maximum amount that could be awarded for each of pain and suffering and wilful and reckless practice would initially be set at $20,000, but Bill C-81 includes a provision that would increase these amounts over time to account for inflation. If individuals and organizations think that the accessibility commissioner made an error in dismissing a complaint or in ordering a remedy, they would be able to make an appeal. For most complaints, these appeals would go to the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal. For complaints about parliamentary entities, appeals would go to the Federal Public Sector Labour Relations and Employment Board.

The accessibility commissioner would not be responsible for dealing with all complaints, however. In recognition of, and to leverage, the existing expertise of the Canadian Transportation Agency and the CRTC, these organizations would be responsible for dealing with complaints in the federal passenger transportation network and in respect of the Broadcasting Act and Telecommunications Act, respectively.

Through the amendments to the Canada Transportation Act proposed in Bill C-81, the Canadian Transportation Agency would continue to deal with complaints in relation to undue barriers to the mobility of persons with disabilities in the federal transportation network, with enhanced remedies, such as compensation for pain and suffering, which would be better aligned with the remedies available under the Canadian Human Rights Act.

The Canadian Transportation Agency would also deal with a new type of complaint that addresses contraventions of regulations made under the Canada Transportation Act that result in harm, similar to complaints made to the accessibility commissioner under the proposed accessible canada act, with similar remedies for individuals.

For complaints about broadcasting and telecommunications services, Canadians would continue to file complaints with the CRTC, which would use its existing authorities under the Broadcasting Act and the Telecommunications...”

Hon. Peter Van Loan (York—Simcoe, CPC)

September 24th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“... so successful for centuries.

Now, returning to the bill, clause 51 addresses the role of the CRTC in the area of information and communication technologies. This provides me the opportunity to ...”

Ms. Cheryl Hardcastle (Windsor—Tecumseh, NDP)

September 19th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...of the bill, for example, empowers the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission, CRTC, to totally exempt any obligated organization it wishes within its mandate from any or all of the accessibility plan requirements. Worse still, the bill provides no means by which persons with disabilities can register their concerns before a decision is made to grant an exemption. This is deeply troubling.

Also problematic is that another section of Bill C-81 gives the federal cabinet the power to make regulations that can exempt any obligated organizations from a wide range of obligations under the act. The bill would allow cabinet to do this, and it need not provide any reasons when it does. Seriously, if cabinet is allowed to do this, why are we here today?

I also find it perplexing that while the bill requires obligated organizations to establish accessibility plans, it does not require these plans to be good plans. It does not require an obligated organization to implement its accessibility plan. This is curiouser and curiouser.

Potentially quite troubling is a situation created in section 172 whereby a regulation created by the Canadian Transportation Agency for example, without debate, could end up trumping obligations under the Canadian Human Rights Act. It should be a basic principle of Bill C-81 that no provisions therein supersede any human rights. This is a perfect example of some of the technical issues that need to be addressed, and I want our stakeholders who understand the impact of this troublesome section to know that we will seek to have it removed.

The bill likewise separates enforcement and implementation in a confusing way over a tangle of different public enforcement agencies rather than providing people with disabilities with the simple one-stop enforcement they need. The CRTC will provide enforcement for its obligated organizations and so too will the Canadian Transportation Agency. (1635)

The bill does this, despite the reality that both the CRTC and the CTA have an unsatisfactory track record when it comes to enforcing accessibility over m...”

Mr. Alupa Clarke (Beauport—Limoilou, CPC)

June 6th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister spoke about the review of the CRTC Act. The last time the Official Languages Act was comprehensively reviewed was when the Conserv...”

Mr. Pierre Nantel (Longueuil—Saint-Hubert, NDP)

June 4th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, last week, the CRTC submitted its report, which proposes solutions for the future of our culture. It describes the ...”

Mr. Sean Casey (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Canadian Heritage, Lib.)

June 4th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, first, we would like to thank the chair of the CRTC, Ian Scott, and his team for their report, as well as all of the businesses and stakeholders wh...”

Ms. Rachel Blaney (North Island—Powell River, NDP)

June 4th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, last week, the CRTC submitted its report to the heritage minister, indicating that urgent reforms are needed to sus...”

Mr. Sean Casey (Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Canadian Heritage, Lib.)

June 4th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, first we would like to thank CRTC chair Ian Scott and his team for the report, and thank the many companies and creative industry...”

Mr. Pierre Nantel (Longueuil—Saint-Hubert, NDP)

May 30th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...t her half-baked cultural policy was simply an interim policy awaiting further consultations by the CRTC on the future of our culture.

The CRTC will release its report tomorrow, and rumour has it that the minister is going to engage in con...”

Hon. Mélanie Joly (Minister of Canadian Heritage, Lib.)

May 4th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“...ir issue, but I would like to remind my colleague that this matter is under the jurisdiction of the CRTC, which functions at arm's length from the government.

On the telecommunications infrastru...”


The Senate

Hon. David Tkachuk

June 14th
Hansard Link

Transport and Communications Notice of Motion to Authorize Committee to Study the Modernization of Canadian Communications Legislation

“...of a national broadband strategy; (k)net neutrality; and (l)statutory authority and the role of the CRTC; and That the committee report to the Senate no later than June 28, 2019, and that it retain al...”

Hon. Mélanie Joly, P.C., M.P., Minister of Canadian Heritage

June 5th
Hansard Link

Ministry of Canadian Heritage Regulation of Internet Services

“...us to share our culture with the country and throughout the world. Third, we want to strengthen the CRTC’s mandate, which is also included in the Broadcasting Act. What does that mean? It means that, ...”


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