Airline: The Last Six Months
Of Federal Activity

About

This Report

This is a computer-generated report that shows all of the federal activity with respect to the keyword "Airline" over the last six months. This is a demonstration of the power of our government relations automation software.

Hansard

House: 12 Speeches
Senate: 14 Speeches

House Senate

Bills

Active: 0

Regulations

Filed: 0
Proposed: 0

The House

Hon. Patty Hajdu

October 16th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...applies to people working for federal banks, railroads, marine transportation services and ferries, airlines and airports, and radio and television broadcasting.[English]

Bill C-65 would also, i...”

Mr. Randy Boissonnault

October 16th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“Mr. Speaker, I am glad that my colleague is in robust health. As he can see, my hairline is taking the same trajectory that his has taken. I do not know if that makes us wiser or ju...”

Mr. Stephen Fuhr (Kelowna—Lake Country, Lib.)

October 15th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...f of flight operators state that finding qualified pilots is a significant challenge, with regional airlines reporting flight cancellations due to a lack of flight crew in the busy summer months. This problem will significantly worsen in the coming years, more broadly affecting the travelling Canadian public, unless action is taken.

In terms of recruitment challenges, the report notes that over half the flight operators surveyed say that finding qualified and experienced employees is a significant challenge. One-third cite finding pilots with applicable aircraft-type ratings their biggest skills challenge.

With new carriers commencing operations and established larger airlines experiencing both growth and the retirement of senior pilots, there has been an increase in the rate of drawing pilots from regional airlines and small operators. This is affecting regional airlines particularly hard. Smaller airlines are a training ground for young pilots, who will normally try to move up to larger carriers as soon as possible. Historically, it took two to three years before pilots moved up, but this can happen now in 18 months, and in some cases six months, under current conditions. This trend is forcing some regional carriers to lower their experience levels for new hires in an effort to maintain their operations.

This hurts regional airlines financially as well. Airlines are often required to give new hires a type endorsement for the type of aircraft they will fly. These training costs have traditionally been amortized over the expected retention period of a pilot. With retention periods dropping from three years to six months, the economics change dramatically. Some regional airlines have reported cancellations of flights due to a lack of pilots and/or higher training costs.

The increasing need for more pilots is also causing faster than normal attrition rates at flying schools. New instructors who would normally work two to three years before moving on to the airlines or charter jobs are now moving up within four to six months. This is resulting in flying schools having a serious problem maintaining a sufficient number of experienced instructors to take on chief or senior flight instructor roles. This in turn further reduces the supply of new pilots.

Some of the biggest challenges in pilot production in Canada are the high cost of training for new commercial pilots, the low starting salaries, and an industry that has evolved a non-linear career path.

The traditional pathway to becoming a pilot in Canada has involved earning licenses and ratings that cost approximately $75,000 yet can climb to over $150,000, with tuition and other student costs, when combined with post-secondary education. Most student pilots acquire substantial debt to cover these expenses. It is common to see high rates of attrition in flight programs due to a lack of financing.

Canadian pilots are also recruited by airlines outside Canada, where many of these positions pay more than local airlines offer. Overseas and larger companies draw pilots away from the flying schools and smaller operators. As previously noted, this adds strain not only for sensitive northern operators but also for niche operations, such as crop-spraying and forest firefighting.

Since I tabled this motion back in April, I have heard from a number of air operators, flight schools and aviation organizations, which all indicated that they are very concerned about the pilot shortage and the future of aviation in Canada. (1105)

Ms. Heather Bell, chair of the B.C. Aviation Council, had this to say on the matter:

As the Board Chair of the British Columbia Aviation Council, I am writing this letter in support of an industrywide request for focused financial assistance for Canadians pursuing careers as aviators. It is indisputable that the industry is facing a shortage of qualified pilots at all levels; local, national and international. This shortage is seeing scheduled carriers cancelling flights as qualified pilots are being recruited “up and out” of small and regional operators into the more lucrative positions offered at a national or even international level. While this type of career progression has long been the way of the industry, we are facing a crisis as there is not the requisite level of new pilots entering the system to sustain the pilot “pipeline”. The issue is being exacerbated as we are seeing a dearth of qualified flight instructors making the training of new pilots more and more difficult. Further, the impending regulation change around Flight and Duty Time will see an increased need for pilots over and above the shortages currently forecasted.

In British Columbia, we have many remote communities that rely on air service for routine medical and food supply. Our concern, as local operators struggle with pilot resources, is that this critical access is at risk. One local operator has had to hire and train the equivalent of 100% of their pilot workforce in less than one year; a costly endeavour that also leads to a cadre of less experienced pilots. Other operators have been advertising long-term for pilots for every aircraft type in their fleet, and while they are receiving applications, they are unable to move forward as they cannot keep a training pilot on staff. Another operator that services both Northern BC and Alberta is so stymied by attempts to hire locally that they are actively recruiting internationally but are running headlong into immigration issues that make hiring from outside Canada an economic impossibility.

As an Aviation Council that is focused on ensuring the sustainability of our industry, BCAC fears this pilot shortage will have severe and critical impacts not only on our economy and operators, but on our remote and Indigenous communities. As one of the barriers to increased pilot supply is definitely the financial burden of obtaining the requisite flight time experience, we feel increased financial aid would be a strong indicator that the government is aware of the issue and supporting positive change.

Sincerely,

Heather Bell

In my riding of Kelowna—Lake Country, Carson Air, a well-respected cargo, air ambulance, flight training and aircraft maintenance company, had this to add:

The challenges faced by Flight Training Units are many and complex. The high cost of the initial training to receive a commercial pilot's license (CPL) leaves students deeply in debt. To ask CPL students to remain in training longer to receive an Instructor Rating is very challenging now. With the current state of hiring in the industry, new pilots do not need to spend the time instructing to build hours to move to commercial operators. Many operators, even including major airlines, are accepting some candidates directly out of flight school with a Commercial Pilot License and little to no actual time in the cockpit.

This obviously creates a trickle down effect where there are then less pilots to train the next generation, and the shortage then intensifies.

At Carson Air, we have a constant backlog of students due to a shortage of instructors. Less and less students are attracted to the industry due to the historically low wages, and high costs of entry and training.

Changes to infrastructure which could help the Flight Training Units would best be served in the form of additional funding available to students. Currently, the cost of a 2 year Commercial Aviation Diploma program is approximately $85,000.00. Of that, most students are eligible for only about $28,000 in student loans. The barriers are huge and many qualified candidates are simply not applying. If they do get through, working as an instructor when you can move to a Commercial flying position in some cases right away is not attractive to them, at all.

Currently we estimate that a 30% increase in training rates is needed in order to retain qualified instructors. This will simply magnify the cycle of higher costs and fewer students.

Programs which allow for streamlined or aviation specific Labour Market Impact Analysis for aviation related jobs—both pilots and Aircraft Maintenance Engineers—are also urgently needed. Collaboration between government ministries [is required] to ensure immigration can be fast tracked for pilots and AMEs with suitable qualifications. Our studies have found that suitable candidates exist world wide, and these people wish to come to Canada. However, applying the tests of LMIAs and other requirements is excessively onerous. Additionally, the current classification system puts pilots in the same category as skilled trades, requiring a potential employer to pay wages equivalent to highly paid skilled tradespeople in that province for what amounts to an entry level position. Paying high wages for starting level positions creates animosity among employees and financial difficulties for employers. (1110)

The challenges faced that I have noted above are what we are seeing in the industry currently, today. If and when the proposed Fatigue Management Regulations for pilots come into effect, we estimate that there will be up to 30% more pilots required for the work that we are doing today. This does not take into effect attrition through retirement and airline hiring in the future. This will force operators to reduce service, and potentially create sa...”

Mr. Jim Eglinski (Yellowhead, CPC)

October 15th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...er choices down the road. When I flew to Ottawa from my riding yesterday, I only had two options of airlines. It is hard to expect an industry to diversify and compete when it does not have enough talent to draw on. I have read of many cases in the news where flights were cancelled because the crew members needed to rest and there was not another crew to replace them. From a pilot and safety standpoint, I completely understand the need for rest, but as a consumer, this can be incredibly frustrating. If there were more pilots, perhaps a lot of these cancellations could be avoided because there would be someone to replace those who need to rest. Increasing the number of pilots and retaining them could help increase airline choices for Canadians and benefit the consumer experience when flying.

Not only do we need pilots for the large airline companies, but there are also a lot of other industries in Canada which rely on pilots. They...”

Mr. Angelo Iacono (Alfred-Pellan, Lib.)

October 15th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...ed pilots.

The demand is not limited just in Canada; it is a growing trend globally. In 2017, airlines around the world carried more than four billion passengers, which is more than double the number they carried in 2004. That number is projected to keep growing for the foreseeable future. (1145) [Translation]

The resulting global demand for pilots and crew members is not something we can ignore.

We want to ensure that Canada's aviation sector has a rich and diverse talent pool.

Our colleague from Kelowna—Lake Country is right to ask the committee to study flight training schools in Canada to ensure that they can function effectively, that there are no unnecessary regulatory barriers, and that they can train enough pilots to meet our own needs.

We already know that certain factors have a direct influence on the number of trained pilots and crew members available in the aviation sector. For one thing, the very high cost of training is a deterrent to many who would be interested. For another, the dearth of instructors directly impacts training capacity. In addition, the large number of international students makes it harder for Canadians to access flight training.

In essence, Canadian flight training programs have so much to offer that we have become the collateral victims of our own success.

The labour supply problem in the aviation sector is complex and calls for a multi-layered approach that requires co-operation with a number of stakeholders.

This means that Canada will face a shortage of qualified pilots unless the aviation sector, training schools, the provinces and the federal government work together to develop a strategy to fill the gaps.[English]

Industry voices have already identified the scale of the issue in the field. The Transport Canada-commissioned 2016 Conference Board of Canada report entitled, “Building and Retaining Workforce Capacity for Canada's Transportation Sector to 2030”, highlights that the shortage of domestic air pilots, aircraft maintenance engineers and flying instructors, already deficient of 200 employees in 2015, is estimated to reach close to 550 by 2030.

The Air Transport Association of Canada, an industry association representing air operators, estimates that the industry will face a shortage of 6,000 pilots by 2036. The numbers are certainly daunting, but they represent what is expected to happen if no action is taken.

Fortunately, there is already action on a number of fronts. The commercial airline industry in Canada hosted a labour market strategy day, where almost half of the participant...”

Mrs. Kelly Block (Carlton Trail—Eagle Creek, CPC)

October 15th
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...challenges might simply be the nature of the industry or be necessary due to the region in which an airline operates, nonetheless they can be a factor that a prospective pilot will consider. If they can be mitigated by the airline or the industry, they should be looked at.

One area in which airlines and flight schools and perhaps the federal government could partner would be to review the costs and length of time it takes for a new pilot to become qualified. I want to stress that in no way am I suggesting that the safety or the quality of the training should be compromised. When I read that it can cost up to $75,000 for a pilot to reach a level of training in order to be employed as a commercial pilot, I can only imagine that this is a daunting sum for a prospective student considering this as a career path.

1 wonder whether airlines and flight schools could, together with students, develop a partnership in order to: first, alleviate some of the financial risk and burden for the student; second, provide a guaranteed pool of qualified pilots for airlines; and finally, provide a steady flow of students to the flight schools. It should be recognized that this issue is not specific to Canada or even North America. The issue of pilot shortages is one that the airline industry is facing worldwide.

However, coming back to the motion before us, in conclus...”

Hon. Deepak Obhrai (Calgary Forest Lawn, CPC)

October 1st
Hansard Link

Private Members' Business

“...012, CAE, another great Canadian success story, from Montreal, built an aircraft simulator for Cebu airlines. I had the opportunity to be at the opening ceremony with former president Aquino. We put a...”

Ms. Julie Dabrusin

June 7th
Hansard Link

Government Orders

“...f the problems of the existing system right now, and that is the fact that the system is managed by airlines, oddly enough. This brings it back to government so government can handle it responsibly an...”

Hon. Pierre Poilievre (Carleton, CPC)

May 30th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, welcome to the bailout economy.

When Porter Airlines wanted to extend the runway at the Toronto downtown airport the Liberal government said no,...”

Hon. Marc Garneau (Minister of Transport, Lib.)

May 29th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“Mr. Speaker, every Canadian knows that buying an airline ticket entitles the purchaser to a certain level of treatment. That is why we are very proud...”

Hon. Hunter Tootoo (Nunavut, Ind.)

May 28th
Hansard Link

Statements by Members

“...ntinue.

The proposed changes to flight duty time regulations may not be a big issue for large airlines operating in the south. However, these changes, if implemented, would threaten the very survival of the small airlines that service the people of my riding.

The government has repeatedly indicated that Nu...”

Hon. Hunter Tootoo (Nunavut, Ind.)

May 28th
Hansard Link

Oral Questions

“... Canada is proposing to flight crew work hours and rest periods threaten the very survival of small airlines that serve communities in my riding. For all of these communities, air is the only link. Given the unique reliance of these communities on air service, a one-size-fits-all approach will not work.

Will the minister engage in further consultations, as requested by the Coalition of Canadian Airlines, and work with them to achieve a mutually acceptable solution that works for everyone?”


The Senate

Hon. Pierre J. Dalphond

October 18th
Hansard Link

Customs Act Bill to Amend—Second Reading—Debate Continued

“...ns leaving Canada. For those travelling by plane, the information will be collected directly by the airline then forwarded to the agency. For those crossing the border on land, the information will be...”

Hon. Mary Coyle

September 26th
Hansard Link

Customs Act Second Reading—Debate Adjourned

“...ry. Phase 4 is meant to establish an exit system, similar to that in the United States, under which airlines would be required to submit their passenger manifest information to the Canada Border Services Agency on outbound international flights. The Office of the Auditor General of Canada confirmed in the fall of 2016 that the final two phases, Phase 3 and Phase 4, would be implemented in 2018. The proposed changes authorized in Bill C-21 to the Customs Act would provide the Canada Border Services Agency, or CBSA, with the legislative authority to collect basic exit information on all travellers leaving Canada. The information gathered is simple biographical data that can be found on page 2 of one’s passport, such as name, date of birth, sex, nationality. This information will allow the CBSA to track who has left the country and when. Up until now, the CBSA has only been able to collect information on travellers entering Canada. This has resulted in an information gap which may cause law enforcement to miss the exit from our country of, for example, Amber alert victims, individuals escaping justice, individuals seeking to join recognized terrorist groups abroad, or known high-risk travellers and their goods, such as human or drug smugglers or exporters of other illicit goods. Bill C-21 will close this information gap by authorizing the CBSA to collect exit information on all travellers. For those leaving by land, the CBSA will receive information from U.S. Customs and Border Protection, which collects the same information on entry into the United States. For those leaving by air, the CBSA will receive this information from the airlines. In other words, travellers won’t have to provide any additional information or be otherwis...”

Senator Coyle

September 26th
Hansard Link

Customs Act Second Reading—Debate Adjourned

“...rmation from the U.S. border control or, as I said before, from a flight manifest. That includes an airline’s manifest if somebody is flying internationally — not just not U.S. but anywhere internatio...”

Hon. Art Eggleton

September 25th
Hansard Link

Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act Bill to Amend—Second Reading—Debate Adjourned

“...ed in the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives study as having a pension funding deficit include airlines and banks; these pension plans are governed federally by the Pension Benefits Standards Act...”

Hon. Percy Mockler

June 18th
Hansard Link

Budget Implementation Bill, 2018, No. 1 Twenty-ninth Report of National Finance Committee on Subject Matter—Debate Adjourned

“...s were expressed by the Railway Association of Canada, the Canadian Trucking Alliance, the National Airlines Council of Canada and the St. Lawrence Shipoperators, to name a few. Honourable senators, o...”

Hon. Claude Carignan

June 13th
Hansard Link

Criminal Code Bill to Amend—Third Reading—Debate Continued

“... lack of caution? I am particularly concerned about the monitoring of drug and alcohol levels among airline pilots, train engineers and bus or tractor trailer drivers especially in the absence of random drug testing. You will recall the comments I made in my speech at second reading stage. On November 2, 2017, the Transportation Safety Board filed its report on the crash of a Carson Air aircraft that occurred on April 13, 2015, in British Columbia. The TSB investigation indicated that the aircraft’s pilot had a blood alcohol level far above allowable limits and found that he was alcohol impaired. In fact, his blood alcohol level was 0.24, or three times the allowable limit for automobile drivers. Airplane pilots are not allowed to consume alcohol in the eight hours preceding their flight. The TSB report indicated the following: People with alcohol use disorder are at a 60 to 120 times greater risk of suicide than members of the population without a psychiatric illness. Suicide accounts for 20% to 33% of the increased death rate among those with alcohol dependence compared with the general population. The TSB investigation of the airplane accident concluded that the crash was probably caused intentionally by the pilot. Fortunately, this was not a passenger flight, unlike the Germanwings Airbus A320 that had crashed into a mountainside about 20 days earlier, killing all 150 people on board. In the case of the Germanwings crash, it was proven that the co-pilot had acted deliberately. On May 2, Federally Regulated Employers — Transportation and Communications told us the following: [English] Our key message is this: With the introduction of Bill C-46 and its companion bill, Bill C-45, the Government of Canada has failed to address the impact of recreational marijuana on the workplace. This is a serious oversight with potentially catastrophic consequences for workers, employers and the public at large. There is already a safety gap in Canada as it relates to the presence of alcohol and drugs in the workplace. The legalization of cannabis is only going to make this problem worse. (1510) Evidence from the U.S. states that have already legalized cannabis, such as Colorado, reveal startling trends. The data shows that consumption is going to increase when legalization occurs. This matters to employers. We know the same increase in use is going to find its way into the safety-sensitive workplaces. . . . Some groups will argue that alcohol and drug testing infringes an individual’s privacy. Yet Bill C-46, will allow random roadside alcohol testing. This is thought by government to meet the Charter test. If privacy rights are outweighed for an individual driving a single automobile on a highway, the same logic must apply to a pilot flying a plane with 200 passengers, a train conductor hauling 50 cars of chemicals, a bus driver carrying 60 passengers, a trucker operating on a major highway or any worker whose workplace actions could impact the life of a co-worker or the public. We believe a legislated solution is required. We ask that you amend Bill C-46 to accommodate these important concerns. [Translation] Some, like Senator Pratte, claim that this is a matter of labour law, as the issue has been raised by employers. Making a criminal offence to fly a plane or drive a train while impaired under Bill C-46, however, has nothing to do with labour law. This is different from the situation on which the Supreme Court ruled in Irving, in which an employer wanted to test employees for alcohol or drug use in order to take disciplinary action. In this case, we are talking about screening for and enforcing a criminal offence, created by Bill C-46, for which the state must develop the screening tools and methods needed to comply with the act. The Canadian Ferry Association, the Railway Association of Canada, the Toronto Transit Commission, and the Association du camionnage du Québec all spoke out in favour of random testing in their industry. With regard to lessons learned abroad, I have three quick quotes to share with you. Kathleen Fox, chair of the Transportation Safety Board of Canada, appeared before the Standing Senate Committee on Legal and Constitutional Affairs on May 3, 2018, where she said: Following this accident, we analyzed programs that exist in the United States, the United Kingdom and in Australia. The United States and Australia have programs for random testing. However, it is difficult to determine their efficiency. They do not have statistics that would show the number of times they caught someone before they took control of an airplane or before working in a critical safety-sensitive position. We are not in a position to say whether it is effective, but they have very few accidents. They did conduct comparisons before and after these programs came into force. They observed a decrease in accidents with drug or alcohol as factors. Here is what we heard from Nathalie Léveillé, coordinator for legal affairs and compliance for the Association du camionnage du Québec: . . . since 1995, Canadian carriers and heavy vehicle drivers who travel in the United States are subject to very strict regulations that include alcohol and drug tests. This includes, among other things, random tests, post-accident tests, and follow-up tests when drivers return to work. The fact is that since this test regime was put in place, it can be said that the industry’s concerns about drugs and alcohol have practically been eliminated. Here are some statistics about the effects of random testing of public transit drivers. In the United States, according to the American Journal of Epidemiology, 2009, vol. 170, no. 6, the mandatory screening program introduced in 1995 led to a 23 per cent reduction in fatal accidents involving drunk motor carrier drivers. Also in the United States, according to paragraph 105 of the affidavit by Dr. Mace Beckson, professor of psychiatry at UCLA, once random tests were instituted in federally regulated workplaces, the percentage of positive test results dropped from 1.76 per cent in 1995 to 1.2 per cent in 1998 and 0.79 per cent in 2005. The percentage of positive post-accident tests also dropped from 4.3 per cent in 1997 to 2.3 per cent in 2011. Here’s another example, this one from the London Underground. According to an affidavit by Andy Byford, CEO of the Toronto Transit Commission, London Underground management implemented random testing for its employees in 1993. Positive test results decreased dramatically from 3.42 per cent in 1993 to 1.9 per cent in 1994 and 1.18 per cent in 1995 and have remained low ever since. Also according to Andy Byford, in New South Wales, the introduction of random testing in the railway industry in 2004 saw the rate of positive drug tests decrease from 3 per cent in 2004 to 1.4 per cent in 2006 and about 0.75 per cent in 2012. Positive alcohol tests also saw a major decline. Some people will point out that since we argued that random testing is unconstitutional for motorists, it must also be unconstitutional for public transit operators. I disagree. During the course of the Standing Senate Committee on Legal and Constitutional Affairs’ hearings on Bill C-45, I asked Kyla Lee, a lawyer with Acumen Law Corporation, that specific question. Ms. Lee is a criminal defence lawyer practicing in Vancouver primarily in the area of impaired driving law. She is convinced that if Canada were to adopt mandatory random testing, the courts would quickly become clogged up with challenges. She said, and I quote: Some of the major concerns I have with Bill C-46 relate to the mandatory breath testing component of the legislation. It is my view that these provisions of the proposed legislation violate section 8 of the Charter. They permit police officers to conduct completely arbitrary testing of individuals for bodily samples. I took the opportunity to ask Ms. Lee what she thought of random testing for public transit operators and people in key positions such as airline pilots, bus drivers and train engineers. What follow are my question and her answer: [English] If we were to apply the random breath testing system to public carriers, such as airline pilots, locomotive engineers, and anything related to public transportation, such as buses and trains, do you think it would have been much more likely to pass the Charter test than by imposing it on the entire population? Her answer: Yes. I think it would because it eliminates a lot of those concerns about targeting visible minorities or targeting certain individuals. And it also deals with people in a professional capacity where you should know these obligations are on you if you’re taking on the profession of public transit, and it identifies only individuals who control conveyances that contain people or have the potential to cause serious damage to a large number of people. . . . I think it also dovetails really nicely with existing controls and rules and regulations already in place for bus drivers, pilots and trained drivers. It’s not imposing any additional obligation on them. They are already subject to employment restrictions that require them to be tested for drugs and alcohol if their employer requests them to do so. It doesn’t impose any further burden on those people in that capacity. (1520) [Translation] I already gave the example of airline pilots who may get stopped by peace officers after landing to undergo screening at the airpo...”

Senator Carignan

June 13th
Hansard Link

Criminal Code Motion in Amendment Negatived

“...I’m talking about: If we were to apply the random breath testing system to public carriers, such as airline pilots, locomotive engineers, and anything related to public transportation, such as buses a...”

Senator Carignan

June 13th
Hansard Link

Criminal Code Motion in Amendment Negatived

“...hile random testing is fine for people driving their own vehicles, apparently it is not fine for an airline pilot, heavy equipment operator or bus driver. Quite frankly, I think there is a difference,...”

Senator Carignan

June 13th
Hansard Link

Criminal Code Motion in Amendment Negatived

“Yes, of course. Anyone who flies a plane, whether a private aircraft or for an airline, would be committing a criminal offence. The recommendation made by the Transportation Safet...”

Hon. Claude Carignan

June 11th
Hansard Link

Criminal Code Bill to Amend—Third Reading—Motion in Amendment—Debate Continued

“...involving a Carson Air aircraft, the board recommended extending random drug and alcohol testing to airline pilots. The Criminal Code impaired driving offences could also apply to airline pilots, train engineers and ship operators. Do you believe that random testing should be ext...”

Hon. Michael L. MacDonald

June 1st
Hansard Link

Taiwan—Air Canada

“... now includes major Canadian firms such as RBC and Air Canada. Being Canada’s largest international airline at home and abroad, I find this particularly alarming. Air Canada is a company recognized around the world. It carries the name of our country and the Maple Leaf on its fuselage and, in effect, is a de facto carrier of Canadian values. Air Canada should strive to best reflect what our country and our people represent. Taiwan has experienced a remarkable political and economic transition since 1949. A relatively poor, rural and non-democratic entity for most of its existence, today it a prosperous, highly urbanized, modern and democratic society. What has been created in Taiwan in my lifetime is something worth celebrating. Taiwan is today an advanced society by any measurement of social progress. Whether it’s health care, education, quality of life or economic development, Taiwan is a world leader, worthy of emulation. Much of this progress is due to the freedoms they have put to good use — economic freedom, freedom of expression, freedom of the press and the freedom to choose those who govern you. All of these freedoms have taken root in Taiwan, but none of these freedoms can be found in Communist China. The Beijing bullies have shown no hesitation in their aggressive behaviour to delegitimize Taiwanese democracy or even to impart territorial claims in the South China Sea, in direct contravention of international law. With that said, I believe Canadian enterprises should also expect their government to have their back when foreign powers seek to manipulate and control our businesses in such a manner. We should be prepared to call out any third party that is actively attempting to interfere with the independent operations of Canadian businesses. Yet the Trudeau government says nothing. Other governments and world leaders have been outspoken on this issue, so why should we not expect our government to stand up and do the same? Do Air Canada and RBC suspect they would have no public support from their government if they were to have refused China’s terms? In a statement released by the Association of Taiwanese Organizations in Toronto, the Taiwanese-Canadian community has accused Air Canada of ignoring international law for the sake of commercial profit and has threatened to promote a boycott of the airline. Our government’s only response is to say it’s a private business matter. The silence of Can...”

Senator Tkachuk

May 24th
Hansard Link

Transport Taiwan—Air Canada

“...te House issued a press release saying it was Orwellian nonsense that they would dictate to private airlines what to put on their websites. Senator Harder, if Russia, say, were to insist that Air Cana...”

Hon. Victor Oh

May 24th
Hansard Link

Ban on Shark Fin Importation Bill Bill to Amend—Third Reading—Debate Continued

“...a ban on serving shark fin soup at official banquets in September 2013. Air China and several other airlines prohibited shark fin cargo. And a major restaurant chain banned shark fin soup due to growi...”

Hon. Thanh Hai Ngo

May 23rd
Hansard Link

Transport Taiwan—Air Canada

“... to the Government Representative in the Senate. Air Canada, our country’s flag carrier and largest airline, has designated Taiwan as part of China. On April 25, the Civil Aviation Administration of China ordered a number of international airlines, including several from the United States, to change how Taiwan is described on their websi...”


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